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Full text of "Bulletin of the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina"



The Woman's College 

of the 

University of North Carolina 



dOillW 



Catalogue Issue for the Year 1939-40 
Announcements for 1940-41 




PUBLISHED FOUR TIMES DURING THE YEAR 

IN JANUARY, FEBRUARY, APRIL, AND NOVEMBER 

BY THE COLLEGE 

AT GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



The Woman's College 

of the 

University of North Carolina 



tJjiiiietlft 



Catalogue Issue for the Year 1939-40 
Announcements for 1940-41 



THE 
|RTY- EIGHTH 
SESSION 



ENTERED AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER AT THE POST OFFICE 
AT GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA, FEBRUARY 24, 1936, 
UNDER ACT OF CONGRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1912. 





1940 






JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 




S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W i F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
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12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
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31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 




1941 






JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 




S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


3 M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 


12 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
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1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
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24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 IP 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 









THE WOMAN'S COLLEGE OF 

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Session 1940-1941 


1940 




June 12 




August 9 




September 


9 


September 


10 


September 


11 


September 


12 


September 


13 


September 


14 


September 20 


October 5 




November 


21 


December ! 


21 



Summer Session begins. 

Summer Session ends. 

Meeting of the Faculty, Monday, 6:30 p. m. 

Freshman Week begins, Tuesday, 9:00 a. m. 

Examinations for Removal of Conditions, Wednesday. 

Registration of Freshmen and Commercial Students, 

Thursday. 

Registration of Former and Transfer students, 

Friday. 

Work of First Semester begins, Saturday. 

Last day for changes in courses, Friday. 

Founder's Day, Saturday. 

Thanksgiving holiday, Thursday. 

Christmas recess begins at 11:00 a. m., Saturday. 



1941 

January 6 
January 16 
January 17-24 
January 27-28 

January 29 
February 4 
March 29 
April 7 
April 19 
May 22 
May 23-30 
May 31-June 1,2 
June 4 



Classwork resumed at 8:10 a. m., Monday. 
Reading Day, Thursday. 
Examinations, Friday through Thursday. 
Registration for Second Semester, Monday and Tues- 
day. 

Work of Second Semester begins, Wednesday. 
Last day for changes in courses, Tuesday. 
Spring recess begins at 11:00 a. m., Saturday. 
Class work resumed at 8 : 10 a. m., Monday. 
Comprehensive Examinations. 
Reading Day, Friday. 
Examinations, Saturday through Friday. 
Commencement, Saturday, Sunday, Monday. 
Summer Session begins. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

College Calendar 3 

I. Organization 7 

Board of Trustees 7 

1941 7 

1943 7 

1945 8 

1947 9 

Executive Committee 9 

Administrative Council 10 

Faculty 11 

Officers of Administration 11 

Officers of Instruction 11 

Art 11 

Astronomy 12 

Biology 12 

Chemistry 13 

Classical Civilization 13 

Commercial 13 

Economics 13 

Education 14 

English 15 

German 16 

Health 16 

History and Political 

Science 17 

Home Economics 18 

Mathematics 18 

Music 19 

Philosophy 19 

Physical Education 20 

Physics 20 

Psychology 20 

Romance Languages 21 

Secretarial Science 22 

Sociology 22 

Administrative Officers 22 

Secretaries 25 

Standing Committees 26 

II. The College 29 

The History 29 

Memberships 30 

Degrees offered 30 

Buildings and Grounds 30 

Residence Halls 33 

The Library 34 

Student Health Service 35 

The Community 37 

Government 37 

Religion 37 

Social Life 88 

Sports 38 

Organizations 38 

Publications 41 

Public Relations 41 

Self-help 42 



PAGE 

III. Expenses 43 

Residence Hall Students 43 

Non-residence Hall Students 43 

Music Fees 44 

Laboratory Fees 45 

Special courses 45 

Other necessary expenses 45 

Textbooks 46 

Loan Funds, Fellowships, 

and Scholarships 47 

IV. Admission 52 

To the College 52 

Subjects Accepted for Entrance... 52 

Vocational Subjects 53 

Prescribed Requirements 53 

Bachelor of Arts 53 

Bachelor of Science 53 

To Advanced Standing 55 

V. Degrees 56 

Requirements for The Bachelor's 

Degree 56 

Degree of Bachelor of Arts .... 56 

Fields of Concentration 58 

Departmental Major 58 

Inter-departmental Majors .. 59 

Comprehensive Examinations 59 

Honors Courses 59 

Courses Leading to the Degree 

of Bachelor of Science 60 

Bachelor of Science in Music 60 
Bachelor of Science in Home 

Economics 60 

Bachelor of Science in Phy- 
sical Education 65 

Bachelor of Science in Secre- 
tarial Administration 66 

VI. Academic Regulations 68 

Registration 68 

Freshman Week 68 

Academic and Personnel 

Committee 68 

Class Chairmen and Academic 

Advisers 68 

General Regulations 68 

Change of Course 69 

Proficiency Examinations 69 

Entrance Deficiencies 69 

Auditing Courses 70 

Credits 70 

Summer Session and Extension 

Credits 70 

Statements of Credits 71 

Classification 71 

Examinations \ 71 

Reports 72 



Table of Contents 



page 

Quality Points 72 

Residence Requirements 72 

Attendance 72 

Exclusion from College 73 

VII. Courses of Instruction 74 

Art 74 

Design 74 

Drawing and Painting 76 

Art History 77 

Ceramics and Sculpture 78 

Art Education 78 

Astronomy 79 

Biology 79 

Biology 79 

Botany 80 

Zoology 81 

Physiology 82 

Bacteriology 83 

Elementary Science 84 

Geography 84 

Chemistry 85 

Classical Civilization 87 

Greek 87 

Latin 88 

Economics 90 

Education 92 

General Courses 93 

Secondary 94 

Elementary 96 

Library Education 98 

English 99 

Required courses 99 

Elective courses 99 

German 107 

Health 109 

History and Political Science .... 110 

History 11» 

Political Science 113 

Home Economics 114 

Clothing and Textiles 115 

Food and Nutrition 117 

Housing 118 

Home Relationships and 

Child Development 120 

Home Economics Education .... 120 

Institution Economics 121 

General Courses 122 

Master of Science in Home 

Economics 123 



PAGE 

Library 123 

Mathematics 123 

Astronomy 125 

Music 125 

Courses in Applied Music 125 

Courses in Musical Theory 

and Music Education 127 

Philosophy 133 

Physical Education 135 

Teacher Training Courses 

for Major Students 137 

Gymnasium costume 139 

Physics 140 

Psychology 143 

Religion 145 

Romance Languages 146 

French 146 

Spanish 149 

Italian 151 

Secretarial Science 152 

Sociology 154 

School of Music 157 

Courses in Musical Theory and 

Music Education 157 

Courses in Applied Music 157 

Curriculum 157 

Curricula in Music Education... 159 

With Major in Voice 160 

Course requirements 161 

Piano course 161 

Voice course 161 

Violin course 162 

Violin cello course 162 

Organ course 163 

Course in Music Education 163 

Recital attendance 163 

Carnegie Music Library 163 

Students Recitals 163 

Artists Recitals and Concerts .. 164 

College Vested Choir 164 

The Orchestra 164 

The Band 164 

Madrigal Club 164 

Glee Club 165 

Annual High School Music 

Contest Festival 165 

Commercial Department 165 

Enrollment Summary 172 

VIII. Faculty and Administrative Staff.. 169 
Student List 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/bulletinofwomans19401941 



/. Organization 



TRUSTEES 

Clyde Roark Hoey, Governor, President ex officio of the Board of 
Trustees. 

Clyde Atkinson Erwin, Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
Member ex officio of the Board of Trustees. 

Henry Mauger London, Secretary of the Board. 

THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

1941* 

Miss Annie Moore Cherry Spring Hope 

J. Ed Butler Morganton 

Hayden Clement Salisbury 

Josephus Daniels Raleigh 

C C. Efird Albemarle 

J. C. B. Ehringhaus Raleigh 

Reuben Oscar Everett Durham 

Richard Tillman Fountain Rocky Mount 

Jones Fuller Durham 

James Alexander Gray Winston-Salem 

Junius Daniel Grimes Washington 

R. L. Harris Roxboro 

Robert Eugene Little Wadesboro 

Mrs. Lily C. Morehead Mebane Spray 

Cameron Morrison Charlotte 

Harriss Newman Wilmington 

Clarence Poe Raleigh 

J. Hawley Poole West End 

Marvin R. Ritch Charlotte 

Miss Easdale Shaw Rockingham 

Mrs. May Lovelace Tomlinson High Point 

Irvin Burchard Tucker Whiteville 

George R. Ward Wallace 

John Kenyon Wilson Elizabeth City 

Graham Woodard Wilson 

1943 

Alexander Boyd Andrews Raleigh 

Dudley Bagley Moyock 

Walter D. Barbee Seaboard 

* The legal term of office expired April 1 of the year indicated. 



8 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Kemp Davis Battle Rocky Mount 

James Albert Bridger Bladenboro 

Mrs. Minnie McIver Brown Chadbourn 

Charles F. Cates Mebane 

Richard Thurmond Chatham Winston-Salem 

William Grimes Clark Tarboro 

Authur Mills Dixon Gastonia 

Rufus Alexander Doughton Sparta 

Thomas C. Hoyle, Jr - Greensboro 

Robert Grady Johnson Burgaw 

A. Hall Johnston Asheville 

Charles Andrew Jonas * Lincolnton 

Kemp Plummer Lewis Durham 

Arthur H. London Pittsboro 

Mrs. E. L. McKee Sylva 

James Edward Millis High Point 

Andrew L. Monroe Raleigh 

Kemp B. Nixon Lincolnton 

John Johnston Parker Charlotte 

Richard J. Reynolds Winston-Salem 

Miss Lelia Styron New Bern 

Samuel F. Teague Goldsboro 

1945 

Sam M. Blount Washington 

Victor S. Bryant Durham 

John W. Clark Franklinville 

Mrs. Laura Weill Cone Greensboro 

Henry Groves Connor Wilson 

Isaac P. Davis Manteo 

John G. Dawson Kinston 

Carl Thomas Durham Chapel Hill 

Raymond Rowe Eagle New Bern 

J. Bart Fearing Windsor 

Alonzo Dillard Folger Mount Airy 

George C. Green Weldon 

Edwin Clarke Gregory Salisbury 

John Sprunt Hill Durham 

Henry L. Ingram Asheboro 

Benjamin Kittrell Lassiter Oxford 

Mrs. Daisy Hanes Lassiter Charlotte 

Henry M. London Raleigh 

George B. Mason Gastonia 



Trustees 9 

Edwin Pate Laurel Hill 

James C. Pittman Sanford 

J. Benton Stacy Ruffin 

Kenneth S. Tanner Spindale 

Leslie Weil Goldsboro 

Francis D. Winston Windsor 



Mrs. Kate P. Arrington Warrenton 

H. D. Bateman Wilson 

Emmitt H. Bellamy Wilmington 

Burton Craige Winston-Salem 

William E. Fenner Rocky Mount 

Oliver Max Gardner Shelby 

Harry P. Grier, Jr. Statesville 

Ira T. Johnston Jefferson 

John H. Kerr, Sr Warrenton 

Mark C. Lassiter Snow Hill 

William L. Lumpkin Louisburg 

G. L. Lyerly Hickory 

L. P. McLendon Greensboro 

Henry B. Marrow Smithfield 

William Daniel Merritt Roxboro 

Walter Murphy Salisbury 

Charles B. Park, Jr ...Raleigh 

Haywood Parker Asheville 

J. T. Pritchett Lenoir 

Carl A. Rudisill Cherryville 

George Stephens Asheville 

Fred I. Sutton Kinston 

Henry P. Taylor Wadesboro 

John W. Umstead, Jr Chapel Hill 

Charles Whedbee Hertford 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE TRUSTEES 

Clyde Roark Hoey, ex officio, Chairman. 

Henry Mauger London, ex officio, Secretary. 

**1940: John Sprunt Hill, Walter Murphy, John J. Parker. 

**1942: Mrs. Laura Weill Cone, Miss Easdale Shaw, Haywood 

Parker. 
**1944: Josephus Daniels, Clarence Poe, Irvin B. Tucker. 
**1946: Charles Whedbee, 0. Max Gardner, Leslie Weil. 



** Term expires July 1 of year indicated. 



Administrative Council 
University of North Carolina 

Frank Porter Graham, M.A., LL.D., D.C.L., D.Litt, President. 

WOMAN'S COLLEGE AT GREENSBORO 

Walter Clinton Jackson, B.S., LL.D., Dean of Administration. 

Cornelia Strong, B.A., M.A., Professor of Mathematics. 

Meta H. Miller, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 

James Albert Highsmith, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Psy- 
chology. 

Benjamin B. Kendrick, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of History. 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL 

Robert Burton House, B.A., M.A., Dean of Administration. 

Archibald Henderson, Ph.D., D.C.L., LL.D., Kenan Professor of 
Mathematics. 

Albert Ray Newsome, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Robert Ervin Coker, S.B., M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

William Frederick Prouty, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
AND ENGINEERING AT RALEIGH 

John William Harrelson, B.E., M.E., Dean of Administration. 

Thomas P. Nelson, D.Sc, Dean of the Textile School. 

Monroe Evans Gardner, B.S., Professor of Horticulture. 

Jasper Leonidas Stuckey, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 

William Hand Browne, Jr., B.A., P.A.E., B.E., Professor of Elec- 
trical Engineering. 






The Faculty 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Frank Porter Graham, B.A., M.A., LL.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., Presi- 
dent of the University. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1909 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1916 ; Bir- 
mingham-Southern, Davidson, LL.D. ; Catawba, D.C.L. ; Columbia University, 
D.Litt. ; Duke University, LL.D. 

Julius I. Foust, Ph.B., LL.D., President Emeritus. 

University of North Carolina, Ph.B., 1890 ; LL.D., 1910. 

Walter Clinton Jackson, B.S., LL.D., Dean of Administration. 

Mercer University, B.S., 1900; LL.D., 1926; University of Chicago. 

Harriet Wiseman Elliott, B.A., M.A., Dean of Women. 

Hanover College, B.A., 1910 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1913. 

LAURA H. Coit, Secretary of the College. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1896. 

Mary Taylor Moore, Registrar. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1903. 

Claude Edward Teague, B.A., Assistant Controller. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1912. 

E. J. Forney, Treasurer. 

Ruth M. Collings, B.A., M.D., Physician. 

Pomona College, B.A., 1919 ; University of Pennsylvania, M.D., 1923. 

Guy R. Lyle, B.A., B.S., M.S., Librarian. 

University of Alberta, B.A., 1927 ; Columbia University, B.S., 1929 ; M.S., 1932. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 
ART 

Gregory D. Ivy, B.S., M.A., Professor. 

Central Missouri State Teachers College, B.S., 1928 ; Columbia University, M.A. 
1932. 

Mollie Anne Peterson, Ph.B., M.A., Associate Professor. 

University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1914 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1921. 

Mary Leath Stewart, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Georgia State College for Women, B.S., 1930 ; Duke University, M.A., 1935. 

Helen Thrush, B.F.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

University of Pennsylvania, B.F.A., 1927 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1930. 

Robert M. Skelton, B.S., M.A., Instructor. 

State Teachers College (Pa.), B.S., 1934; Columbia University, M.A., 1935. 

Hermione Hamlett, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

Texas State College for Women, B.A., 1929 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1937. 



12 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



Dorothy S. McIlvaine, B.F.A., M.A., Instructor. 

University of Washington, B.F.A., 1926 ; Teachers College, Columbia University, 
M.A., 1930. 

Florence Baylis Skelton, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

Connecticut College, B.A., 1934 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1935. 

ASTRONOMY 

Cornelia Strong, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

Cornell University, B.A., 1903 ; University of Michigan, M.A., 1931. 

BIOLOGY 

John Paul Givler, Ph.B., M.A., Professor. 

Hamline University, Ph.B., 1906 ; M.A., 1912 ; Johns Hopkins University ; Columbia 
University. 

Earl H. Hall, B.S., M.S., Professor of Botany. 

University of Chicago, B.S., 1919 ; M.S., 1920. 

Inez Coldwell, B.A., Associate Professor. 

Southwestern College, B.A., 1915 ; Johns Hopkins University. 

Archie D. Shaftesbury, B.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Southwestern College, (Kan.) B.A., 1920; Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D., 1934. 

Helen Ingraham, B.S., M.S., Associate Professor. 

Knox College, B.S., 1918 ; University of Chicago, M.S., 1921. 

Maude Williams, B.A., M.S., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

University of Illinois, B.A., 1924; M.S., 1926. 

Lila Belle Love, B.S., M.S., Associate Professor of Bacteriology. 

Mississippi State College for Women, B.S. ; University of Nebraska, M.S., 1921 ; 
University of Chicago ; Johns Hopkins School of Public Health and Hygiene. 

Albert Frederick Thiel, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Botany. 

University of Minnesota, B.A., 1916 ; University of Nebraska, M.A., 1917 ; Univer- 
sity of Chicago, Ph.D., 1931. 

Lawrence S. Ritchie, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

Grand Island College, B.A., 1928 ; Northwestern University, M.A., 1930 ; Ph.D., 1936. 

Edna Arundel, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

Ohio University, B.A., 1921 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1929 ; Yale University. 

Virginia Gangstad, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Instructor. 

University of Illinois, B.A., 1934 ; M.A., 1935 ; Ph.D., 1938. 

Mary Elizabeth Brummitt, B.A., Assistant. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1933. 

Madeline Heffner, B.A., Assistant. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1935. 

Elizabeth Anderson, B.A., Assistant. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1937. 






Faculty 13 



CHEMISTRY 



Florence Louise Schaeffer, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

Barnard College, B.A., 1920 ; Mount Holyoke College, M.A., 1922 ; Yale University. 

Mary M. Petty, B.S., Professor. 

Wellesley College, B.S., 1885 ; Bryn Mawr College, 1895-1896. 

Elva Eudora Barrow, B.A., M.S., Associate Professor. 

Randolph-Macon Woman's College, B.A., 1911 ; University of Chicago, M.S., 1923. 

Martha E. Smith, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

Mount Holyoke College, B.A., 1929 ; M.A., 1931 ; University of Wisconsin, Ph J)., 
1937. 

Kate Wilkins, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1935 ; Mount Hol- 
yoke College, M.A., 1937. 

Florence Olson England, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Instructor. 

University of South Dakota, B.A., 1932 ; M.A., 1934 ; State University of Iowa, Ph.D., 
1938. 

Mary Welsh Parker, B.A., Assistant. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1931. 

Frances Roberg, B.S., Assistant. 

Wellesley College, B.S., 1939. 

CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 

Charlton C. Jernigan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Duke University, B.A., 1925 ; M.A., 1926 ; Ph.D., 1935 ; University of Chicago. 

Marie B. Denneen, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

University of Minnesota, B.A., 1912 ; M.A., 1922. 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

♦George M. Joyce, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor. 

Indiana State Teachers College, B.S., 1930 ; Indiana University, M.S., 1935. 

Mary Ellis Marley, Instructor. 

Southern Conservatory, Perry Schools, Columbia. 

Mary Harrell, B.A., Instructor. 

Queens College, B.A., 1917. 

Barbara A. Perecinic, B.S., Instructor. 

Ohio State University, B.S., 1937. 

ECONOMICS 

Albert S. Keister, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Otterbein College, B.A., 1910 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1911 ; University of Chi- 
C£Lgo« .L n.JJ», 1927* 



* On leave. 



14 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Claude Edward Teague, B.A., Professor. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1912. 

*George M. Joyce, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor. 

Indiana State Teachers College, B.S., 1930 ; Indiana University, M.S., 1935. 

Frederick H. Bunting, B.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

University of the South, B.A., 1927; University of North Carolina, Ph.D., 1939; 
Harvard University ; Oxford University, England. 

Brant Bonner, B.A., Instructor. 

University of Chicago, B.A., 1930. 

EDUCATION 

John H. Cook, B.S., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Ohio Northern University, B.S., 1908 ; Miami, B.A., 1912 ; Columbia University, 
M.A., 1917 ; Ph.D.. 1925. 

Ruth Fitzgerald, B.S., M.A., Professor. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1905 ; Columbia University, B.S., 
1925; M.A., 1926. 

Oliver Perry Clutts, B.S., M.A., Professor. 

Ohio University, B.S., 1913 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1917. 

George E. Anselm, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Augustana College, B.A., 1921 ; University of Iowa, M.A., 1928 ; University of Iowa, 
Ph.D., 1937. 

Herbert Kimmel, B.A., Ph.M., Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Indiana University, B.A., 1908 ; University of Chicago, Ph.M., 1909 ; University of 
North Carolina, Ph.D., 1935. 

Marie B. Denneen, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

University of Minnesota, B.A., 1912 ; M.A., 1922. 

J. A. Smith, B.Ed., M.S., Associate Professor. 

Illinois State Normal University, B.Ed., 1916 ; University of Illinois, M.S., 1926. 

Miriam MacFayden, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1900 ; Columbia University, B.S., 
1926 ; M.A.. 1930. 

Anna M. Kreimeier, Ph.B., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

University of Chicago, Ph.B.. 1923 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1937 ; University 
of London. 

Betty Aiken Land, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1927 ; Columbia University, M.A., 
1930. 

Anna Reger, B.A., B.S., Assistant Professor, and Librarian Curry 
Demonstration School. 

West Virginia Wesleyan, B.A., 1916 ; Columbia University, B.S., 1931. 

Mary Fitzgerald, B.A., Assistant Professor. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1908 ; B.A., 1930. 

Harriett Mehaffie, Ph.B., Assistant Professor. 

University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1926. 



Faculty 15 

Ruth Gunter, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1925 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1930. 

♦Helen Krug, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Eastern State Teachers College (S. Dak.), B.S., 1927; Columbia University, M.A., 
1931. 

Ruth Shaver, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Ohio Wesleyan University, B.A., 1922 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1926 ; Sorbonne, 
Paris. 

Margaret Flintom, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

George Peabody College for Teachers, B.A., 1925 ; M.A., 1928. 

Eugenia Hunter, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

Goucher College, B.A., 1926 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1939. 

Florence Shelburne, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Assistant Librarian Curry 
Library. 

Lynchburg College, B.A., 1929 ; Peabody College, B.S. in L.S., 1936. 

Dorothy S. Allen, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

New Jersey College For Women, B.A., 1933 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1935. 

Marguerite C. Ogden, B.S., M.A., Instructor. 

Teachers College. Columbia University, B.S., 1925 ; M.A., 1932. 

♦♦Elizabeth Snedden, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

University of Colorado, B.A., 1931 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1939. 



ENGLISH 



William C. Smith, Ph.B., L.H.D., Professor. 

University of North Carolina, Ph.B., 1896 ; L.H.D., 1920. 

Alonzo C. Hall, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

Elon College, B.A., 1910 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1913. 

William Raymond Taylor, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1915 ; Harvard University, M.A., 1916. 

Leonard B. Hurley, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Duke University, B.A., 1913 ; M.A., 1916 ; University of North Carolina, Ph.D., 1932. 

J. Arthur Dunn, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

University of Missouri, B.A., 1908 ; M.A., 1909. 

George P. Wilson, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1913; Columbia University, M.A., 1919; Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 

Mildred Rutherford Gould, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Columbia University, B.A., 1907 ; M.A., 1921. 

Abigail E. Rowley, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Denison University, B.A., 1915 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1921. 

Nettie S. Tillett, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Duke Univers ity, B.A., 1913 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1924. 

* On leave second semester. 
** Second Semester. 



16 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

James W. Painter, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Emory and Henry College, B.A., 1920 ; University of Tennessee, M.A., 1923. 

Jane Summerell, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1910; 1922; Columbia University, 
M.A., 1924. 

Marc Friedlaender, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Princeton University, B.A., 1926 ; Harvard University, M.A., 1929 ; University of 
Chicago, Ph.D., 1938. 

John E. Bridgers, Jr., B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Duke University, B.A., 1923 ; Harvard University, M.A., 1925. 

May Dulaney Bush, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

Hollins College, B.A., 1923 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1928. 

Charlotte Kohler, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Instructor. 

Vassar College, B.A., 1929 ; University of Virginia, M.A., 1933 ; Ph.D., 1936. 

Margaret V. Shields, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

Belhaven College, B.A., 1927 ; Duke University, M.A., 1937. 

Marion Tatum, B.A., Instructor. 

University of North Carolina, B.A.. 1932. 

Kathleen S. Painter, B.A., Instructor. 

University of Tennessee, B.A., 1924. 

Wilbur Dorsett, B.A., M.A., Assistant in Dramatics. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1934 ; M.A., 1936. 

Sallie Sewell, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

Barnard College, B.A., 1936 ; University of North Carolina, M.A., 1939. 



GERMAN 

Caroline B. Schoch, Ph.B., M.A., Professor. 

University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1907 ; University of Marburg, 1907-1908 ; University 
of Wisconsin, M.A., 1919. 

Klasine von Westen, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Instructor. 

Morningside College, B.A., 1930 ; University of Nebraska, M.A., 1932 ; University 
of Illinois. Ph.D.. 1937. 



HEALTH 
Medical Division 

Ruth M. Collings, B.A., M.D., Physician and Professor of Hygiene. 

Pomona College, B.A., 1919 ; University of Pennsylvania, M.D., 1923. 

Anna M. Gove, M.D., Physician. 

Woman's Medical College of the New York Infirmary, M.D., 1892. 

Bernice L. Eversmeyer, B.S., M.D., Assistant Physician. 

University of Wisconsin, B.S., 1932 ; University of Iowa, M.D., 1937. 



Faculty 17 



Hygiene 



Victoria Carlsson, B.Sc, M.Sc., M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Columbia University, B.Sc, 1922 ; M.Sc, M.A., 1923 ; Ph.D., 1929. 

Mildred Pearl Harris, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

University of Michigan, B.A., 1921 ; M.A., 1924. 

Anne S hamburger, Instructor. 

Guilford College; Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 
History 

Benjamin B. Kendrick, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Mercer University, B.S., 1905 ; Columbia, M.A., 1911 ; Columbia, Ph.D., 1914. 

Alex Matthews Arnett, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Mercer University, B.A., 1908 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1913 ; Ph.D., 1922. 

Clarence D. Johns, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

Randolph-Macon College, B.A., 1908; Chicago University, M.A., 1911. 

Magnhilde Gullander, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

University of Wisconsin, B.A., 1916 ; University of Pennsylvania, M.A., 1925. 

Vera Largent, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Knox College, B.A., 1915 ; University of Chicago, M.A., 1923. 

Bernice Evelyn Draper, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Lawrence College, B.A., 1919 ; University of Wisconsin, M.A., 1922. 

Eugene E. Pfaff, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1930 ; M.A., 1934 ; Cornell University, Ph.D.. 
1936. 

Josephine Hege, B.A., Instructor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1927 ; University of Virginia, M A 
1939. 

Kathleen T. Pfaff, B.A., Instructor. 

Coker College, B.A., 1928 ; University of Virginia and University of North Carolina. 

Christiana McFadyen, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1936; Columbia 
University, M.A., 1938. 



Political Science 



Harriet Wiseman Elliott, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

Hanover College, B.A., 1910 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1913. 

Louise Brevard Alexander, B.A., Associate Professor. 

Presbyterian College, B.A., 1907; University of Tennessee; University of North 



18 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Margaret Messenger Edwards, B.S., M.A., Professor. 

Montana State College, B.S., 1912; Columbia University, M.A., 1920; Cornell Uni- 
versity ; University of Chicago. 

Mabel Campbell, B.S., M.A., Professor. 

Iowa State University, B.S., 1908; Teachers College, Columbia University, M.A. 
1922. 

Viva M. Playfoot, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Columbia University, B.S., 1925 ; M.A., 1931. 

Blanche Tansil, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor. 

University of Tennessee, B.S., 1921 ; George Peabody College for Teachers, M.A.. 
1927. 

Flora White Edwards, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor. 

Guilford College, B.S., 1911 ; George Peabody College, B.S., 1916 ; University of Chi- 
cago, M.S.. 1934. 

Madeleine Blakey Street, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

College of William and Mary, B.S., 1922 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1931. 

Bess Naylor Rosa, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

University of Missouri, B.S., 1914 ; M.A., 1917 ; Merrill Palmer School. 

Harriet Alice Naumann, B.A., M.S., Assistant Professor. 

Grinnell College, B.A., 1929 ; Iowa State College, M.S., 1932. 

Agnes N. Coxe, B.L., B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Flora Macdonald College, B.L., 1919 ; North Carolina College for Women, B.S., 1927 ; 
Columbia University, M.A., 1930. 

Bernice Allen, B.S., M.S., Field Teacher Trainer. 

Columbia University, B.S., 1926 ; M.S., 1931. 

Evelyn Howell, B.S., Instructor. 

Wesieyan College ; Peabody Conservatory ; North Carolina College for Women, B.S., 
1932 ; North Carolina State College. 

Frances Forbes, B.S., M.S., Instructor. 

University of Georgia, B.S., 1928 ; M.S., 1931. 

Mabel C. Bowers, B.S., Instructor. 

University of Texas, B.S., 1936. 

Elizabeth C. Cooke, B.S., Assistant. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.S., 1937. 

Helen Kirk Surratt, B.S., Assistant. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.S., 1936 ; University of 
Washington. 

MATHEMATICS 

Helen Barton, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Goucher College, B.A., 1913 ; Johns Hopkins University, M.A., 1922 ; Ph.D., 1926. 

Cornelia Strong, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

Cornell, University, B.A., 1903 ; University of Michigan, M.A., 1931. 



Faculty 19 

Emily Holmes Watkins, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Randolph-Macon Woman's College, B.A., 1916; Columbia University, M.A., 1926. 

Ione H. Grogan, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1926 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1928. 



MUSIC 



H. Hugh Altvater, B.A., Mus.M., Professor of Music and Dean of 
the School of Music. 

University of Michigan, B.A., 1920 ; Southwestern College, Mus.M., 1925 ; University 
of Michigan, Mus.M., 1929. 

George M. Thompson, Mus.B., Mus.M., Professor of Organ. 

Beaver College (Pa.), Mus.B., 1915; Mus.M., 1920; Pittsburgh Musical Institute 
and Chicago College of Music ; Pupil of Clarence Eddy of Chicago and Joseph Bonnet 
of Paris. 

Alleine Richard Minor, B.S., Associate Professor. 

Diploma, Meredith College, 1912 ; New England Conservatory of Music ; Columbia 
University, B.S., 1930. 

Mary Lois Ferrell, Associate Professor of Piano. 

Diploma, Meredith College, 1916 ; Graduate in Music, Northwestern University ; Stu- 
dent of Ernest Hutcheson and Emil Sauer. 

Grace Van Dyke More, Mus.B., M.S., Associate Professor of Pub- 
lic School Music. 

University of Illinois, Mus.B., 1922; M.S., 1931. 

Ruth Hannas, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

University of California, B.A., 1914; M.A., 1928; University of Rochester (Eastman 
School of Music), Ph.D., 1934. 

BmDiE Helen Holloway, B.S., M.S., Assistant Professor. 

Oberlin College Conservatory, B.S., 1926; M.S., 1931. 

Paul B. Oncley, B.A., Mus.B., Mus.M., Assistant Professor. 

Southwestern College, B.A., Eastman School of Music, B.M., 1932 ; M.M., 1933. 

Dorothy Lee Clement, B.S., Instructor. 

The North Carolina College for Women. B.S., 1923. 

George Edwin Henry, Mus.B., Mus.M., Instructor. 

American Conservatory of Music, B.M., 1933 ; American Conservatory of Music 
M.M., 1936. 

Alma Lissow Oncley, Mus.B., Mus.M., Instructor. 

Eastman School of Music, B.M., M.M.. 1932. 

George W. Dickieson, B.M., Instructor. 

Salem College, B.M.. 1934. 

Harper Stephens, B.A., Instructor. 

Michigan State University, B.A., 1938. 



PHILOSOPHY 



John A. Clark, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Amherst, B.A., 1929 ; Harvard University, M.A., 1930 ; Ph.D., 1935. 






20 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Mary Channing Coleman, B.S., Professor. 

Columbia University, B.S., 1917 ; Wellesley College. 

*Hope Tisdale, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Barnard College, B.A., 1925 ; Diploma, Central School of Hygiene and Physical Edu- 
cation, 1927 ; New York University, M.A., 1935. 

Ethel L. Martus, B.A., M.S., Assistant Professor. 

Brown University, B.A., 1929 ; Wellesley College, M.S., 1931. 

Christine White, B.S., Assistant Professor. 

Boston School of Physical Education ; Boston University, B.S., 1935. 

Dorothy Davis, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Western College, B.A., 1928 ; University of Wisconsin, M.A., 1930. 

* Edith Vail, B.S., Instructor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.S., 1931 ; Dalcroze Institute ; Bennington 
School of the Dance. 

Herbert W. Park, Instructor. 

Springfield College, Columbia University. 

Henrietta Thompson, B.S., M.S., Instructor. 

University of Wisconsin, B.S., 1935 ; M.S., 1936. 

Miriam A. Shelden, B.S., M.A., Instructor. 

Russell Sage College, B.S., 1933 ; New York University, M.A., 1938. 

Anna Scott Hoye, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

Lynchburg College, B.A., 1936 ; University of Wisconsin, M.A., 1939. 

Jean Brownlee, B.A., Instructor. 

University of Nebraska, B.A., 1935 ; Bennington School of the Dance, Mary Weig- 
man School of the Dance, Berlin, Germany. 

PHYSICS 

Calvin N. Warfield, B.E., M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Johns Hopkins University, B.E., 1923 ; M.A., 1925 ; Ph.D., 1926. 

John A. Tiedeman, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

Union College, B.S., 1926; M.S., 1928; University of Virginia, Ph.D., 1931. 

Ruth Gill, B.A., Assistant. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1938. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



James Albert Highsmith, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1910 ; M.A., 1915 ; George Peabody College for 
Teachers, Ph.D.. 1923. 

William Woodrow Martin, Ph.B., M.A., Professor. 

University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1904 ; M.A., 1922. 



* On leave. 









Faculty 21 

Elizabeth Duffy, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1925; Columbia University, M.A., 
1926 ; Johns Hopkins, Ph.D., 1928. 

Key L. Barkley, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor. 

Berea College, B.A., 1926 ; University of North Carolina, M.A., 1927 ; Ph.D., 1930. 

Wilton P. Chase, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor. 

Syracuse University, B.A., 1930 ; Dartmouth, M.A., 1932 ; University of Minnesota, 
Ph.D.. 1935. 

Marion E. Stanland, B.A., M.A., Psychometric Assistant. 

Huntington College, B.A., 1928; University of Minnesota, M.A., 1937. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Winfield S. Barney, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Dartmouth College, B.A., 1905 ; Hobart College, M.A., 1911 ; Syracuse University, 
Ph.D., 1916. 

George A. Underwood, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

University of Missouri, B.A., 1905 ; M.A., 1906 ; Harvard University, Ph.D., 1914 ; 
Sorbonne, University of Paris, 1911-1912. 

Malcolm K. Hooke, B.A., D. de l'Univ., Professor. 

University of Chattanooga, B.A., 1918 ; Sorbonne, Diplome d'etudes de Civilisation 
francaise, 1921 ; Docteur de l'Universite de Paris, 1926. 

Meta Helena Miller, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Professor. 

Goucher College, B.A., 1917; Johns Hopkins University, M.A., 1919; Ph.D., 1922; 
Certificat d'etudes pratiques de prononciation francaise. Institut de phonetique, 
Universite de Paris, 1931. 

Jessie C. Laird, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Mount Holyoke College, B.A., 1906 ; University of Michigan, M.A., 1909 ; Univer- 
sity of Marburg, Alliance Frangaise, Paris ; University of Poiters ; Officier d' Academic 

Rene Hard-re, Prof, des E.N., Associate Professor. 

C.E.N. Angers, 1908; University of Caen; C.A.P. Rennes, 1911; Professorat des 
Ecoles Normales, Paris, 1919 ; University of London ; University of Edinburgh ; 
Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur; Officier de l'lnstruction Publique. 

Augustine LaRochelle, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

University of Vermont, B.A., 1916 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1921 ; Diploma, 
Centro de Estudios Historicos, Madrid. 

Alice Katherine Abbot, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Smith College, B. A., 1921 ; University of Illinois, M.A., 1927 ; Centro de Estudios 
Historicos, Madrid. 

Helen Frances Cutting, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Adelphi College, B.A., 1921 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1930 ; University of Chicago, 
M.A., 1933 ; Certificate, Centro de Estudios, Historicos, Madrid. 

Virginia Christian Farinholt, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Pro- 
fessor. 

College of William and Mary, B.A., 1928 ; University of Chicago, M.A., 1930 ; Ph.D., 
1936 ; Alliance Francaise, Paris. 

Katherine Taylor, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1928 ; Radcliffe College, M.A., 1929. 

Annie Beam Funderburk, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1916 ; University of North Carolina, 
M.A., 1934. 



22 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

Patty L. Spruill, B.S., B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.S., 1912 ; B.A., 1926 ; New York Univer- 
sity, M.A., 1937. 

Maude Adams, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

Cornell College, B.A. ; Certificate, Gregg School, Chicago ; State University of Iowa, 
M.A., 1935. 

G. H. Parker, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor. 

State Teachers College, Aberdeen, South Dakota, B.S., 1928 ; University of Iowa, 
M.A., 1932. 

Clay Harm an, B.S., Instructor. 

Appalachian State Teacher's College, B.S., 1930. 

Adele Pitts Lowrance, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

Winthrop College, B.A., 1919 ; University of Pittsburgh, M.A., 1938. 



SOCIOLOGY 

Glenn R. Johnson, B.A., M.A., Professor. 

Reed College, B.A., 1915 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1916. 

Lyda Gordon Shivers, B.A., M.A., LL.B., Ph.D., Associate Profes- 
sor. 

University of Mississippi, B.A., 1928 ; M.A., 1930 ; LL.B., 1930 ; University of North 
Carolina, Ph.D., 1935. 

Mereb E. Mossman, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor. 

Morningside College, B.A., 1926 ; University of Chicago, M.A., 1928. 

Grace Hilford, B.S., Assistant. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.S., 1939. 

THE LIBRARY 

Guy R. Lyle, B.A., B.S., M.S., Professor, Librarian. 

University of Alberta, B.A., 1927 ; Columbia University, B.S., 1929 ; M.S., 1932. 

E. Elizabeth Sampson, B.S., Head Cataloguer. 

Simmons College, B.S., 1918. 

Virginia Trumper, In Charge of Periodicals. 

Denison University, Louisville Public Library Training Class. 

Sue Vernon Williams, B.A., M.A., Reference Librarian. 

Randolph-Macon Woman's College, B.A., 1919 ; M.A., 1922 ; Carnegie Library School 
(Atlanta), Certificate, 1922. 

Marjorie Hood, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Head of Circulation Department. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1926; Emory University, B.A. in 
Library Science, 1936. 

Minnie Middleton Hussey, B.A., Readers* Adviser. 

Meredith College, B.A., 1911 ; The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1930. 

Treva Wilkerson, B.A., Circulation Department. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1933. 



Faculty 23 

Sarah Bowling, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Order Assistant and Secretary 
to the Librarian. 

Judson College, B.A., 1931 ; University of North Carolina, B.A. in L.S., 1938. 

Alice L. Boyd, B.A., M.A., B.S. in L.S., Assistant Cataloguer and 
Circulation Manager. 

University of North Dakota, B.A., 1932; University of Cincinnati, M.A., 1935; 
Western Reserve, B.S. in L.S., 1938. 

Anna M. Urban, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Reference Assistant and In- 
structor in Library Use. 

Cornell University, B.A., 1929 ; Emory University, B.A. in L.S., 1938. 

Emma Linton Holman, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Reserve Librarian. 

College of William and Mary, B.A., 1931 ; University of North Carolina, B.A. in 
L.S.. 1939. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Charles Wiley Phillips, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor and Di- 
rector of Public Relations. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1921 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1927. 

Vhiginia Terrell Lathrop, B.A., Publications. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1923. 

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

Wilmina Maltbie Rowland, B.S., M.A., Director of Religious Ac- 
tivities. 

Wilson College, B.S., 1929 ; Yale University, M.A., 1937. 

COUNSELORS 

Helen Burns, B.A., M.A., Counselor. 

Iowa University, B.A., 1925 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1937. 

Anne Fulton Carter, B.A., Counselor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1921. 

Hazel Clark, B.S., M.A., Counselor. 

Columbia University, B.S., 1934; M.A., 1935. 

Rebecca Cole, B.S., M.S., Counselor. 

University of Michigan, B.S., 1930; Syracuse University, M.S., 1936. 

Annie Beam Funderburk, B.A., M.A., Counselor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1916 ; University of North Carolina, 
M. A., 1934. 

Ione H. Grogan, B.A., M.A., Counselor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1926 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1928. 

Martha Elizabeth Hathaway, B.S., Counselor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.S., 1925. 

Anne Pleasant Hopkins, B.A., Counselor. 

Agnes Scott. B.A., 1932. 



24 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Anna Scott Hoye, B.A., M.A., Instructor. 

Lynchburg College, B.A., 1936 ; University of Wisconsin, M.A., 1939. 

Ethel Haskin Hunter, Counselor. 

Diploma, Howard Payne College, 1906. 

Minnie L. Jamison, Counselor. 

The North Carolina College for Women. 

Nancy Duke Lewis, B.A., M.A., Counselor. 

University of Kentucky, B.A., 1932; Syracuse University; University of Kentucky, 
M.A., 1933. 

Evelyn Martin, B.A., Counselor. 

Georgia State College for Women, B.A., 1930. 

Marguerite C. Ogden, B.S., M.A., Counselor. 

Teachers College, Columbia University, B.S., 1925 ; M.A., 1932. 

Mary Welsh Parker, B.A., Counselor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A.. 1931. 

Katherine Taylor, B.A., M.A., Counselor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1928 ; Radcliffe College, M.A., 1929. 

OTHER OFFICERS 

Mabel Swanson, B.S., M.S., Dietitian. 

University of Washington, B.S., 1926 ; Columbia University, M.S., 193u. 

Edna A. Forney, B.A., Assistant Treasurer. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1908 ; B.A., 1929. 

Mary Alice Tennent, B.A., Assistant Registrar. 

The North Carolina College for Women, 1920. 

Estelle Boyd, Supervisor of Dormitories. 

Pratt Institute. 

Clara Booth Byrd, B.A., Alumnae Secretary. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1913 ; 1928. 

Jessie R. McLean, R. N., Nurse. 

Cora Jane Staton, R.N., Nurse. 

Lena Tuck, R.N., Nurse. 

Bessie Doub, Assistant Dietitian. 

Sarah Sue Cassell, B.A., Assistant Dietitian. 

Battle Creek College, B.A., 1936. 

Betty Brown Jester, Manager of Book Store. 

The North Carolina College for Women, 1931. 

Janette Stout, B.A., M.A., Manager of the Post Office. 

King's School of Dramatics, B.O., 1928; Elon College, B.A., 1930; Columbia Uni- 
versity, M.A., 1931. 

J. M. Sink, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 



Faculty 25 

SECRETARIES AND OTHER ASSISTANTS 

Hallie Anthony, Department of Public Relations. 
Frances Foster, Office of the Alumnae Secretary. 
Elizabeth Gant, B.S., Office of the Dean of Music. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.S., 1937. 

fMARGARET Haigler, Office of the Registrar. 
Edith Harwood, B.L., Office of the Registrar. 

Berea College, B.L., 1920. 

Mary Hasty, Department of Public Relations. 
Kathleen Petit Hawkins, Office of the Registrar. 
Sara Henry, B.A., Office of the Treasurer. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1931. 

Annie H. Hughes, Office of the College Physician. 

May Lattimore, Office of the Dean of Women. 

Mary Betty Lee, Office of the Principal of Curry Training School. 

Edythe Orrell Leslie, Department of Home Economics. 

Lillian Mebane Lovings, Mimeographing Department. 

Eva Cox Melvin, B.L., Department of Education. 

Mary Jane Mims, Office of the Registrar. 

Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.S., 1939. 

Mildred P. Newton, B.A., Secretary of Admissions, Office of the 
Registrar. 

Goucher College, B.A., 1924. 

Mary Nunn, Office of the Class Chairman. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.S., 1937. 

Helen Pickard, Office of the Assistant Controller. 
♦Elizabeth Yates, B.A., Office of the Dean of Administration. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, B.A., 1936. 



* On leave. 

t Resigned March 1940. 



Standing Committees 
Of The Faculty 

The Faculty Council. The Faculty Council, meetings of which are 
presided over by the Dean of Administration, is the legislative body 
of the College. It is composed of Professors, the Chief Administra- 
tive Officers, Associate and Assistant Professors. The time for regu- 
lar meetings is the evening of the third Monday of each month. 

Advisory Committee. Dean Jackson, Chairman ex officio; Dean 
Elliott, ex officio; Mr. Teague, ex officio; Mr. Givler, Dr. Barton, Dr. 
Collings,* Dr. Keister,* Mr. Wilson, Miss Edwards, Miss Barrow 
and Mr. Thompson. 

Academic and Personnel Committee. Dean Elliott, Chairman; 
Mr. Painter, Chairman of Class of 1940; Dr. Shivers, Chairman of 
Class of 1941; Miss Watkins, Chairman of Class of 1942; Miss Burns, 
Chairman of Freshman Class; Dr. Collings, Miss Ferrell, Miss 
Draper, representative of student legislature; Dr. Friedlaender, and 
Dr. Duffy. 

Admissions. Mr. Painter, Chairman; Miss Mary Taylor Moore, 
Miss Burns. 

Committee on Advanced Standing. Miss Strong, Chairman; Miss 
Rowley, Mr. Johns, Miss Mary Taylor Moore. 

Advisers. Members of the Faculty, under the guidance of the Class 
Chairmen, serve as advisers for all freshman and sophomore stu- 
dents. 

Calendar of College Events. Dr. Collings, Chairman; Dr. Jerni- 
gan, Miss Minor. 

College Dramatics. Dr. Kendrick, Chairman; Miss Edwards, Miss 
Grace Van Dyke More, Miss Kreimeier, Mr. Ivy. 

Committee on College Publications. Mr. Phillips, Chairman; Dr. 
Arnett, Miss Coleman, Miss Edwards, Miss Ruth Fitzgerald, Mr. 
Ivy, Miss More, Miss Sampson, Mr. Teague, and Miss Tillett. 

Committee on Comprehensive Examinations. Miss Schaeffer, 
Chairman; Mr. Painter, Miss Gullander, Dr. Hooke, Miss Gunter. 

* Term expires February 1, 1940. 



Standing Committees 27 

Concert Committee. Dean Altvater, Chairman; Mr. Thompson, 
Miss Coldwell. 

Curriculum Committee. Dr. Highsmith, Chairman; Dr. Arnett, Dr. 
Barney, Miss Edwards, Miss Ruth Fitzgerald, Mr. A. C. Hall, Miss 
Coleman, Miss Schaeffer, Mr. Thompson. 

Committee on Interdepartmental Majors. Dr. Arnett, Chair- 
man; Dr. Miller, Dr. Warfield. 

Lecture Committee. Dr. Hurley, Chairman; Dr. Kendrick, Miss 
Ingraham. 

Library Committee. Dr. Arnett, Chairman; Miss Gunter, Mr. Lyle, 
Dr. Underwood, Dr. Warfield, Mr. Wilson. 

Point System Committee. Dr. Pfaff, Chairman; Miss Parker, Miss 
Farinholt. 

Committee on Proficiency Examinations. Miss Ruth Fitzgerald, 
Chairman; Dr. Thiel, Miss Grace Van Dyke More, Mr. Wilson (and 
one member of the department giving the examination). 

Schedule. Miss Mary Taylor Moore, Chairman; Miss Martha 
Smith, Dr. Barton, and Mr. Lyle. 

Weil Fellowship. Miss Taylor, Chairman; Miss Schaeffer, Dr. 
Keister. 

Mendenhall Scholarship. Miss Strong, Chairman; Miss Petty, 
Dr. Warfield. 

Social. Miss Petty, Chairman; Miss Abbott, Miss Gunter, Mrs. 
Street, Miss Watkins, Mrs. Funderburk, Miss Cassell, Mrs. Painter. 

NYA Committee. Miss Rowley, Chairman; Dr. Highsmith, Miss 
Playfoot, Miss Coit, Mr. Teague. 

Auditorium. Dr. Shaftsbury, Chairman; Mr. Kimmel, Mr. Clutts, 
Dr. Hooke, Dr. Ritchie, Mr. J. A. Smith, Dr. Barkley, Dr. Chase. 

Inter-Faith Council. Mrs. Funderburk and Dr. Miller. 

Winfield Endowment. Miss Summerell, Miss LaRochelle, Mr. 
Teague. 



28 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Chapel Committee. Miss Mossman, Chairman; Mr. Thompson, Miss 
Tatum, Miss Hathaway, Miss Hege, Mr. Phillips. 

Annual Advisers. Miss Largent, Mr. Ivy, Dr. Kohler. 

Arrival of Students. Mr. Clutts, Chairman; Mr. J. A. Smith, Mr. 
Henry, and Mr. Skelton. 

Departure of Students. Mr. E. H. Hall, Chairman; Mr. Wilson. 

Motion Picture Committee. Dr. Tiedeman, Chairman; Mrs. Ed- 
wards, Miss Largent, Dr. Anselm. 

Loan Committee. Miss Strong, Chairman; Mr. Teague, Mr. Phil- 
lips, Mrs. Hawkins, Miss Taylor. 

Advisory Committee on Religious Activities. Mr. Phillips, Miss 
Mossman, Dr. Friedlaender, Miss Ingraham, Mrs. Funderburk. 



//. The College 



The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina was the 
first institution established by the State of North Carolina for the 
higher education of women. The legislation establishing it was 
enacted in 1891, and the College opened its doors on October 5, 1892. 
The City of Greensboro, situated near the geographical center of 
the State, was particularly suited for the location, and secured the 
new institution by donating a ten-acre site and voting bonds to the 
sum of $30,000 for the erection of its first buildings. 

The College, originally named the State Normal and Industrial 
School and at a later date the North Carolina College for Women, 
came into being as a direct result of a crusade made by Charles 
Duncan Mclver in behalf of the education of women. Other pio- 
neers in public school education — notably, Charles B. Aycock, Edwin 
A. Alderman, and James Y. Joyner — came to Dr. Mclver's as- 
sistance; but to him more than to any other individual the College 
owes its foundation. He became its first president and served it 
until his death in 1906. In that year Dr. Julius I. Foust succeeded 
to the presidency, and upon the foundation laid by Dr. Mclver he 
and his co-workers developed a strong liberal arts college. In 
1934, Dr. Foust retired from active service and was made Presi- 
dent Emeritus of the Woman's College. At the same time Dr. 
Walter Clinton Jackson, who had long served the College as teacher 
and vice-president, was elected head of the institution with the title 
of Dean of Administration. 

The College became a part of the University of North Carolina in 
1931, when the General Assembly of North Carolina passed an act 
to consolidate the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the 
State College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh, and the 
North Carolina College for Women, into the University of North 
Carolina. By the provisions of this act, the North Carolina College 
for Women on July 1, 1932, became the Woman's College of the 
University of North Carolina. At that time, also, the Board of 
Trustees chosen by the General Assembly assumed control of the 
new university, and a few months later they elected Dr. Frank Porter 
Graham its president. 

The growth of the Woman's College has been in every way phe- 
nomenal. Although originally its main purpose was that of pro- 
viding instruction for those expecting to enter the public school 



30 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

system of the State, it has developed into a liberal arts college re- 
spected in all academic circles. For years its graduates have been 
accorded full membership in the American Association of University 
Women, and in 1934, it was awarded a section of Phi Beta Kappa. 
The College now offers liberal courses in the arts and sciences and in 
music; and at the same time it has continued to give teacher train- 
ing and instruction in commercial branches, in home economics, and 
in other subjects the mastery of which will enable women to be- 
come self-supporting. The expansion in a physical way has been 
no less notable. From a student body of 223 and a faculty of 15 the 
College has grown into one of the largest colleges for women in the 
country, with a plant valued at approximately $7,500,000 ; a faculty 
of more than 225; and a student body of 2,257. 

Woman's College is a member of: The Southern Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools; the Association of American Col- 
leges; the American Council on Education; the Southern Associa- 
tion of Colleges for Women; the North Carolina College Confer- 
ence; the American Association of University Women; and is on 
the approved list of the Association of American Universities. 

The College confers five degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Science in Home Economics, Bachelor of Science in Music, Bachelor 
of Science in Physical Education, and Bachelor of Science in Secre- 
tarial Administration. The College is organized into the Liberal 
Arts College and the School of Music. The Liberal Arts College 
consists of the following divisions and departments : Languages and 
Literature, Social Studies, Mathematics and Pure Science, Art, 
Secretarial Science, Home Economics and Education. 

The Woman's College of the University of North Carolina is a part 
of the public school system of the State. As a State institution it 
desires to be of the greatest possible service to the entire people of 
North Carolina, and its advantages are open to all on similar 
terms. 



BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Since its establishment the College has made steady progress in 
material equipment, so that today the property comprises more than 
one hundred acres of improved and wooded land, forty-five build- 
ings, and ample room for recreational activities. The monetary 
valuation of the entire college plant is approximately $7,500,000. 



Buildings and Grounds 31 

The Administration Building (1892) houses the chief administra- 
tive offices. The Dean of Administration, the Treasurer, the Regis- 
trar, the Assistant Controller, the Class Chairmen, and the Dean 
of Women have their offices there. On the second floor are class- 
rooms and faculty offices. 

Little Guilford Hall (1895) now houses the Department of Public 
Relations and is headquarters for student-help, placement, exten- 
sion, and publicity work. 

Students' Building (1901) contains an assembly hall with a seating 
capacity of eight hundred, society halls and rooms, the book store, 
the post office, and storerooms for various student organizations. 

The Dining Rooms (1904) (1922) (1925) (1939), four large halls 
with a capacity of two thousand, are connected through a large 
central serving room with the kitchens and cold storage plant. 

The Library (1905 — rebuilt in 1933 after a disastrous fire) has a 
capacity of 125,000 volumes and 400 readers. Room is provided for 
further expansion. Every facility is provided the inquiring and 
diligent student, whether she wishes to read casually or to engage 
in research. 

Mclver Building (1908), named in honor of the founder and first 
president of the College, contains one hundred and twenty-six lec- 
ture rooms, laboratories, and offices. 

The Infirmary (1912) contains fifty beds for students; offices for 
consultation, examination, and dispensary treatment; and a resi- 
dence for nurses. 



The Hut (1918) was built during the war days by the girls and is 
used for vesper services, socials, and meetings of various kinds. 

The Home Management House (1921) of the Department of Home 
Economics is furnished and equipped on a moderate income level 
and is used by Home Economics Seniors under supervised study and 
direction as a laboratory for conducting the activities of a home. 

The Outdoor Gymnasium (1922), designed originally as an emer- 
gency arrangement has a floor 50x90, with adequate athletic ap- 
paratus, including a marked-off basketball court. 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

The Dean's Home (1923) is a spacious dwelling situated in the 
southwest corner of the campus and serves as the residence of the 
family of the Dean of Administration. 

The Physical Education Building (1923) in addition to a main 
gymnasium and two smaller gymnasia, contains various rooms for 
lecture and remedial purposes, offices for instructors, examination 
and rest rooms, a swimming pool, a storage room, and dressing and 
shower booths. 

The Music Building (1924) contains a recital hall, sixteen class- 
rooms, nine offices, and fifty practice rooms. 

Aycock Auditorium (1926) seats nearly 3,000 persons. The build- 
ing contains, in addition to the large auditorium, reception rooms, 
cloak rooms, offices of the Director of Dramatics and his assistants, 
and an assembly room for the meetings of the Play-Likers. Under 
the stage there is a large laboratory which is used by classes in 
play production as well as by the dramatic organization. 

Curry Building (1926) houses the Training School and the School 
of Education. There are numerous rooms for college classes and 
for the grades, a large demonstration room, an auditorium seating 
about five hundred, and many offices. It is one of the largest and 
most handsomely equipped buildings on the campus, affording 
splendid facilities not only for the college classes, but for practice 
teaching in the grades and high school. 

The Home Economics Building (1927) contains four classrooms and 
seven laboratories; nursery school rooms; an animal experimental 
laboratory; a general lecture room accommodating about 300 peo- 
ple; a cafeteria, cafeteria kitchen and storeroom, and a private din- 
ing room for teaching Institution Economics; a reception room; 
and eight offices. 

Alumnae House (1935) contains a reception hall, living room, li- 
brary, four bedrooms, serving kitchen and pantry, alumnae com- 
mittee room and class headquarters; offices for the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation, for the student publications, for the Student Government 
Association, and an attractive assembly hall for student clubs. 
Standing on the ground formerly occupied by Old Guilford Hall, 
the house is of colonial architecture and is available for use of 
official alumnae and college functions. 

The Science Building (1939) a three-story modern structure is situ- 
ated on College Avenue, and houses laboratories, classrooms, and 
offices of the Biology, Chemistry, and Physics departments. 



Residence Halls 33 



RESIDENCE HALLS 



There are fifteen residence halls on the campus. In each hall there 
is a Counselor to whom the students may go for advice and from 
whom they obtain permissions relating to social activities in ac- 
cordance with the regulations of the College. 

The rooms in the halls are comfortably fitted up for students. Only 
single beds are used. Each student is expected to bring for her own 
use the following : a pillow, bed linen, blankets (two pairs), bed- 
spreads, and towels. 

North Spencer Hall and South Spencer Hall (1904) offer accommo- 
dations for three hundred and twenty students, and houses officers 
of Religious Activities, and a game room. In 1938 these halls were 
remodeled and made thoroughly modern. 

Woman's Hall (1912) was dedicated by the General Assembly of 
North Carolina to the Women of the Confederacy. It accommodates 
fifty-six students. 

Kirkland Hall (1912), named for Miss Sue May Kirkland, the first 
woman principal of the College, accommodates eighty-four stu- 
dents. 

Anna Howard Shaw Hall (1920) contains rooms for one hundred 
and four students. 

Gray Hall (1921), named for Mr. Robert T. Gray, a member of the 
Board of Trustees of the College from 1900 to 1912, affords ac- 
commodations for one hundred and twenty-two students. 

Bailey Hall (1922), named for Mr. T. B. Bailey, a member of the 
Board of Trustees of the College from 1902 to 1916, contains rooms 
for one hundred and twenty-two students. 

Cotten Hall (1922), named for Mrs. Sally Southall Cotten, accom- 
modates one hundred and twenty-two students. 

Hinshaw Hall (1922), named for Colonel G. W. Hinshaw, a member 
of the Board of Trustees of the College from 1910 to 1918, offers 
accommodations for one hundred and twenty-two students. 

Laura Coit Hall (1923), named for Miss Laura Coit, secretary of 
the College, has accommodations for one hundred and twenty-two 
students. 



34 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Jamison Hall (1923), named for Miss Minnie Jamison, one of the 
first students and long time member of the faculty, also accommo- 
dates one hundred and twenty-two students. 

Mary Foust Hall (1927), was named by the alumnae of the College 
in memory of the daughter of President Emeritus Foust. It con- 
tains rooms for one hundred and forty-six students. 

New Guilford Hall (1927) is a duplicate of Mary Foust. 

Halls A and B (1939) are two distinct halls, but are connected, giv- 
ing the appearance of one large building. Together these halls ac- 
commodate two hundred and ninety students. 

THE LIBRARY 

The Library, completely remodeled and enlarged after the fire of 
September, 1932, is designed to serve the cultural needs of the col- 
lege community as well as the purely academic assignments of the 
classroom. It has a present seating capacity of about 400 and a 
book capacity of approximately 100,000 volumes. 

The book collection now numbers 82,707 volumes. Approximately 
4,000 to 5,000 volumes are added annually through purchase and 
gift. The reference collection contains all the standard general 
reference sets as well as many of the specialized reference works 
in different fields. Approximately 435 purchased periodicals, 148 
gift periodicals, and 12 newspaper subscriptions supplement the 
resources of the book collection. Like most college libraries, the 
"Woman's College Library has a number of special collections in dif- 
ferent fields (French literature, music, Negro), but in recent years 
the main emphasis has been placed on developing a special collec- 
tion in all matters pertaining to women. Being a woman's college 
library, it is logical that the library should start developing in a 
direction which will ultimately benefit not only the students on the 
campus but the women of the State. 

For the convenience of the students, an open-shelf system is used 
in the Reserve Room where the many assigned and suggested sup- 
plementary readings are available. Worthy of special note is an 
exceptionally attractive Reading Room on the second floor in the 
north wing, which is devoted to the encouragement of cultural, 
recreational, and inspirational reading. It is informally furnished 
with easy chairs, sofas, and floor lamps, giving the effect of a home 



Library 35 

library. This room contains the fiction collection, now numbering 
approximately 2,800 volumes. Grouped here, also are the selected 
collections of philosophy, religion, sociology, science, art, literature, 
travel, history, and biography chosen from the general collection by 
the Readers' Adviser. All books circulate. Here also are held 
interesting exhibits of books, pictures, and other works of art, 
student library prize competitions, and occasional informal talks. 
These talks may be reviews of books, critical estimates of authors, 
or readings from plays and poetry of current interest. Statistics 
show an increasing appreciation of this feature of the library's 
work. Whatever their interest, students are seeking good reading 
in greater numbers than ever before and the library believes their 
zeal is worth encouraging. Every effort is made to create here an 
atmosphere of bookish informality. 

An elective course in the use of the library and library books is 
offered to new students by the Reference Department. 

Rules regarding the use of the library and its books are made solely 
to benefit the greatest number of borrowers and are kept at a mini- 
mum. A list of library rules is included in the student's handbook 
and in the library handbook "Help Yourself." 

When college is in session, the library is open on week days from 
8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and on Sundays (for recreational reading) 
from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. During vacations the library is open 
week days from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 m. and from 2 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
except on Saturdays, when 12:00 m. is the closing hour. The Li- 
brary is closed on New Year's Day, Commencement Day, the Fourth 
of July, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

The student health service has as its aim the maintenance of good 
health among all members of the College community. To further 
this objective the work is necessarily of two types : first, preventive 
measures, and second, the care of sick students. Preventive meas- 
ures comprise: first, a complete medical examination of each stu- 
dent in both her freshman and senior years. This examination in- 
cludes a careful physical examination, laboratory tests, and a chest 
X-ray of every entering student. The health service occasionally 
must recommend to the administration that a student physically 
unable to carry the full college load be asked to lighten her work or 
to withdraw from college until such time as her health shall im- 
prove. Second, follow-up examinations of all students showing 



36 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

remediable defects, with an especial effort to see that all such de- 
fects are corrected as soon as possible; third, careful checking of 
all students engaged in self-help activities, extra academic work, 
athletic contests, or other strenuous extra-curricular duties ; fourth, 
vaccination for smallpox of each member of the college community 
every five years in accordance with the ordinance of the city of 
Greensboro, and typhoid vaccination of all food handlers yearly; 
fifth, health supervision of the physical conditions under which stu- 
dents work and live. Proper diet, heating, lighting, ventilation, 
and sanitation are all included among these conditions. 

The v care of sick students, which is the second major duty of the 
health service, is centered in the Anna M. Gove Infirmary. Here, 
with a staff of two full-time and one half-time physicians and two 
graduate nurses always in attendance, all medical and minor sur- 
gical cases are given complete care. Major surgical cases must 
be referred to a hospital and surgeon not directly connected with 
the College. 

All resident students too ill to attend their college duties are admit- 
ted to the Infirmary for care, and excuses are issued upon their re- 
covery and readmission to classes. Town students ill at home must 
bring to the college physician a note either from their parents or 
attending physician within seventy-two hours of their return to 
school. Excuses are then issued by the medical staff in accordance 
with the rules laid down by the faculty council. Students should 
report promptly to the Infirmary in case of illness of any kind. 
Prompt attention to minor conditions prevents the development of 
major ill health. In order to care for all cases promptly the stu- 
dents' health service holds office hours as follows: 



Doctors 

8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. daily except Sunday. 

1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. daily except Saturday and Sunday. 

Afternoons by appointment. Emergency at any time. 

Nurses 

7:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. daily except Sunday. 
1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. daily except Sunday. 
6:45 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. daily except Sunday. 
8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. Sundays. 



The Community 37 

THE COMMUNITY 

Government 

The government of the College is based upon the principles to be 
found in any well-organized community. The Faculty and the stu- 
dents have integrated their ideas in the formation of the Constitu- 
tion. The law-making authority resides in a representative body 
from the student group and the Faculty. All student officers are 
chosen democratically. The student organization works in close 
cooperation with the Dean of Women and the Counselors who have 
charge of the residence halls. 

There are three divisions of the student government machinery: the 
Judicial Board, the Legislature, and the House Organizations, serv- 
ing in their various capacities. It is understood that to the Faculty 
and the Executive Officers is reserved the handling of such matters 
as affect academic questions, matters relating to the health of the 
college community, the control of property, and of special cases of 
discipline which are outside of student jurisdiction. 

Religion 

Voluntary Organizations. Though the College is non-sectarian in 
its management, the students are surrounded by religious influ- 
ences. In addition to the Young Women's Christian Association, 
there are organized church groups with which students may asso- 
ciate themselves for congenial Christian fellowship and for train- 
ing in church and religious leadership. Four churches — Methodist, 
Episcopal, Baptist, and Presbyterian — maintain student secretar- 
ies who live near the College and work through student centers or 
churches adjoining the campus. The Inter-Faith Council is made 
up of the student presidents of the church groups and the Young 
Women's Christian Association, the four church secretaries and 
Faculty advisers for the other groups, and functions as a unifying 
center for all religious activities. Students are encouraged both 
by the College and the churches to attend regularly the church of 
their choice. 

Director. The College employs a full-time, trained Director of Re- 
ligious Activities. It is her duty to coordinate all these religious 
activities and organizations and advise students about their own 
personal religious problems. 

University Sermons. Four Sunday evenings each year are set 
aside for University Sermons. These messages are brought by out- 
standing spiritual leaders from the South and other parts of the 
country, representing different denominations. 






38 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Chapel. Chapel exercises are held in Aycock auditorium on Tues- 
days. Attendance is required. The exercises are often of a devo- 
tional nature with the vested choir, composed of one hundred and 
twenty-five students, singing. 

Social Life 

The social life of the College centers around the residence hall units, 
the four societies, and various clubs and class organizations. Pic- 
nics, week-end camping trips, teas, formal and informal dances help 
create a normal social atmosphere. Through certain of the clubs 
and through the advisory system, members of the Faculty are able 
to establish social contacts with the students, and often entertain 
them in their homes. Altogether there are many opportunities 
within the college community for a wholesome social life. 

The gym, the Hut and Students' Building are all available for formal 
and informal social contacts. Parties, teas, banquets, dances, and 
group meetings of various kinds are often on the calendar here, but 
are concentrated at week-ends. 

Peabody Park is situated north of the residence halls, contains 
many acres of wooded, rolling land and is traversed by walks and 
by-paths. 

SPORTS 

The athletic fields include twelve tennis courts; soccer, hockey, and 
baseball fields; archery range; and play space for minor team 
games and individual sports. The Athletic Association cabin, six 
miles from the city, is open to the members of the Association for 
week-end camping groups. 

The Outdoor Gymnasium is equipped for basketball, volleyball, bad- 
minton, Softball, etc. The Rosenthal Gymnasium contains the 
swimming pool with modern equipment for heating and purifica- 
tion of the water; also 148 dressing rooms with adjoining showers, 
and one large gymnasium floor and three smaller ones. The indoor 
archery range, dance studio, badminton courts, etc., give ample op- 
portunity for recreational activities and for the acquisition of recrea- 
tional skills of lasting value. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

Lecture Course. The College every year brings to its student body 
a number of distinguished artists in the fields of music, art, the 
dance, and letters. Appearing during the 1939-1940 season were 
the following: Vincent Sheean, The Ballet Caravan, Major George 
Fielding Eliot, Lord Marley, Platoff Don Cossack Choir, H. R. 



Organizations 39 

Knickerbocker, Elsa Maxwell, The Little field-Philadelphia Ballet t 
Congressman T. V. Smith, Louis Adamic, George Dangerfield, Mary 
Ellen Chase, Herbert Agar, John Mason Brown. In addition the 
Play-Likers present at least six plays during the season. 

The entertainment fee paid at the time of registration gives admis- 
sion to the entire series of recitals and lectures. 

Societies. The Adelphian, Cornelian, Dikean, and Aletheian so- 
cieties occupy an important place in student life. The societies as 
organizations managed entirely by students, give opportunity for 
friendship and social improvement. Membership is optional, but 
few, if any, representative students fail to identify themselves with 
one of the societies. Each society owns a comfortable assembly hall 
in Students' building and keeps open house several times during the 
year. Informal teas, dances, and parties are features of many 
regular programs, and each society has a formal dance during the 
spring semester. The regular fortnightly meetings are secret. The 
Board of Trustees prohibits any other secret organizations. 

Dramatics. The College offers exceptional advantages to students 
interested in dramatic activities. Numerous experimental plays, 
departmental plays, one-act plays, as well as pretentious full-length 
plays presented by the Play-Likers, give a considerable number of 
students opportunities not only to act, but also to do creative work 
in the arts of the theatre. The facilities for carrying on such work 
in the College are hardly surpassed by any college in the country. 

A large room in the basement of Aycock Auditorium is used by stu- 
dents in play production for designing, constructing, and painting 
scenery; for sewing stage curtains and draperies; for experiment- 
ing in stage lighting and theatrical make-up; and for rehearsing 
plays. Modern stage electrical equipment of every type is used in 
the lighting experiments. The laboratory is a combination scenic 
studio and experimental workshop. 

In 1937 the Play-Likers were granted the Zeta Omega chapter of 
the Alpha Psi Omega, national honorary dramatic fraternity. 

Y. W. C. A. The Young Women's Christian Association, affiliated 
with the national organization and with the World's Student Chris- 
tian Federation, seeks not only to aid students with their intimate 
daily problems of living, but also to form a channel through which 
they may unite themselves with the great body of students through- 
out the world who seek the best way of life for themselves and for 
all people of all races. Any student of the College may become a 
member of the Association by accepting as her own the three-fold 



40 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

purpose: (1) To realize a full and creative life through a growing 
knowledge of God; (2) To have a part in making this life possible 
for all people; and (3) To seek to understand Jesus and to follow 
Him. In conjunction with the Church groups the Association spon- 
sors seminars, discussion groups, services of worship and religious 
education, chapel programs, recreational activities, intercollegiate 
conferences, campus and community service work, and other group 
and individual activity of religious nature and significance. 

Phi Beta Kappa. There is established at the College a section of 
Alpha of North Carolina of Phi Beta Kappa. Most elections to this 
section of the national honorary scholastic society are from the 
senior class, but there are occasional elections from the junior class 
and from the alumnae. 

Athletic Association sponsors the following activities : swimming, 
gymnastics, modern dance, hockey, baseball, basketball, archery, 
volleyball, soccer, tennis, and speedball. There are no competitive 
sports with other colleges. The athletic program for the year cul- 
minates in a Sports Day late in the spring when games are ar- 
ranged for everyone. 

Clubs. Students who are interested in some particular sport, 
pastime, or academic pursuit will find among the college clubs an 
organization that will give encouragement and counsel. Some 
groups are made up of both students and members of the Faculty, 
but most often they are entirely controlled by the students them- 
selves. Among the clubs which promote interest in sports, music, 
dramatics, debating, or departmental subjects are the following: 
Archery Club, Botany Club, Cercle Frangais, Chemistry Club, Cir- 
culo Espanol, Der Deutsche Verein, Dolphin Club, Education Club, 
Home Economics Club, International Relations Club, Madrigal Club, 
Mathematics Club, Orchestra, Band, Orchesis Club, Physics Club, 
Play-Likers, Quill Club, Science Club, Speakers' Club, Young Voters' 
Club, and Zoology Field Club. 

Alumnae Association. The Alumnae and Former Students Asso- 
ciation of the Women's College of the University of North Caro- 
lina was organized in 1893 and incorporated by act of the General 
Assembly of North Carolina on March 8, 1909. The objects of the 
Association, as set forth in Section 3 of the Act incorporating it, 
are: "To encourage, foster, and promote education in the State of 
North Carolina; to aid and assist the Woman's College of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, by donations or otherwise; to aid and 
assist, by loans or donations, or both, worthy young women of the 
State to obtain an education at the said College, and for such pur- 
pose to receive, hold, invest, manage, and disburse any fund or funds 



Publications 41 

which may come into its possession." For a number of years the 
Association was engaged in raising funds with which to erect an 
Alumnae House on the campus. During the past three years the 
house has been constructed and furnished at a cost of approximately 
$155,000. It was opened in January, 1937. Alumnae House is 
headquarters for alumnae work in general. It also provides offices 
for the Student Government Association, the four student publica- 
tions, and an assembly room for meetings of student clubs. The 
House is available for official alumnae, student, and college affairs — 
social, musical, literary, and academic. 

Officers for the past year were: president, Mrs. R. S. Ferguson, 
Taylorsville ; vice-president, Mrs. Paul Maulden, Kannapolis; gen- 
eral secretary, Miss Clara B. Byrd, Greensboro. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Bulletins and Catalogues: Issued quarterly by the College; con- 
tain matters of general and specific interest to the citizens of the 
State, the Faculty, prospective students, and the College as a whole. 

Alumnae News: Published quarterly. The official organ of the 
Alumnae and Former Students Association. Each issue contains 
college notes, communications from graduates and former students, 
and news matter of interest to friends of the College. 

The Carolinian : The College newspaper, issued Friday of each 
week. 

The Coraddi: The literary magazine of the College, issued quar- 
terly. 

Pine Needles : The College annual, produced under the auspices of 
the Student Government Association. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Placement Bureau. It is the purpose of the Woman's College to 
assist all of its graduates and former students in securing work in 
their chosen fields. Teachers, technicians, secretaries, social work- 
ers, and others will be given every possible aid toward a realization 
of their ambitions in the professional and business world. This 
service does not end when the graduate is placed for the first time, 
but is continuous for all former students. There is no cost for the 
service. Former students desiring such assistance, however, must 
keep the Placement Bureau informed of their plans and activities. 

Extension Division. The Extension Division of the University of 
North Carolina desires to render aid to teachers in service by ar- 



42 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

ranging for technical courses for credit toward a degree or certifi- 
cate, and to offer to them and to other citizens of the State cultural 
and professional courses. The State does not provide this service 
except as it may be self-supporting ; but afternoon or evening courses 
can be arranged at a minimum cost to the individual on or off 
campus. Lecture series by members of the Faculty can also be 
arranged. The counties adjacent to Greensboro are the special 
field of the Woman's College. 

As a part of the Extension work of the College, the library offers 
its services to the people of the State, particularly to teachers and 
alumnae. With the cooperation of the faculty on technical and 
highly specialized subjects, it acts as an information bureau in an- 
swering questions. In addition, it sends out books on many sub- 
jects, especially women's problems and books of professional inter- 
est to teachers, provided these books are not in demand on the 
campus. 

Self-Help. Although it is not possible for a student to earn all of 
her expenses at the Woman's College or for all who apply to earn 
even a part, the College is concerned with giving every opportunity 
to those who desire help. A number of students are employed by 
the College in laboratories, offices, the Library, and the dining rooms. 
Still others are now being aided under the National Youth Adminis- 
tration. As long as the Government furnishes such aid, this in- 
stitution will continue to avail itself of it in order that as many 
young women as possible may have the advantages of college train- 
ing. 

Publications Office. The College Publications Office, where cata- 
logues and bulletins are edited and newspaper stories prepared for 
the press of the State, is also under the supervision of the Director 
of Public Relations. 

Those desiring further information regarding an}*- of the services 
listed above should communicate with Mr. C. W. Phillips, Director 
of Public Relations. 



///. Expenses 



The College is organized and operated on the basis of a full scholas- 
tic year as a unit. Therefore, all charges listed below are for the 
full scholastic year and are due and payable in advance, but for the 
convenience of the students may be paid at the times listed on the 
following page. The College reserves the right to make, with the 
approval of the proper authorities, changes in any of the charges 
listed below at any time. It is necessary that all bills be paid on 
dates specified on the following page. 



For Students Living in Dormitories: 

In State Out State 

Tuition $ 50.00 $ 175.00 

Registration fee 15.00 15.00 

Medical fee 7.00 7.00 

Board (9 months) 145.00 145.00 

Room rent (9 months) 35.00 35.00 

Fuel and lights 30.00 30.00 

Laundry 25.00 25.00 

Other fees and charges 20.00 20.00 

$ 327.00 $ 452.00 

Entertainment fee** 5.00 5.00 

Student Activities fee*** 9.00 9.00 

Total $ 341.00 $ 466.00 

For Students Not Living in Dormitories: 

In State Out State 

Tuition $ 50.00 $ 175.00 

Registration fee 15.00 15.00 

Medical fee 7.00 7.00 

Fuel and lights 15.00 15.00 

Other fees and charges 20.00 20.00 

$ 107.00 $ 232.00 

Student Activities fee*** 9.00 9.00 

Entertainment fee** 5.00 5.00 

Total $ 121.00 $ 246.00 

** This fee admits students to the Civic Music concerts and the lecture program of 
the College, and certain other College-wide activities. 

*** This fee was voted by the student body and approved by the administration. It 
pays membership or participation in the Student Government, the Y. W. C. A., the 
four literary societies, the Carolinian, the Coraddi, Pine Needles, the Athletic Associa- 
tion and other college-wide activities. For an additional payment of $2.00, the student 
may obtain a copy of the annual, Pine Needles. 

In addition to the amounts listed above students must purchase a 
gymnasium outfit costing approximately $8.00. (Commercial stu- 



44 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

dents are charged $7.00 for gymnasium suit) . A laboratory fee of 
$1.00 will be charged for the chest X-ray record which is required 
of every new student. 

The payments for the regular charges and fees will be due as fol- 
lows, in advance: 

For Students Who Board in Dormitories: 

In State Out State 

Room reservation fee $ 10.00 $ 10.00 

On entrance 100.00 150.00 

November 15 95.00 110.00 

January 15 70.00 120.00 

March 15 66.00 76.00 

$ 341.00 $ 466.00 

For Students Who Do Not Board in Dormitories: 

In State Out State 

On entrance $ 70.00 $ 135.00 

January 15 51.00 111.00 

$ 121.00 $ 246.00 

Note: The $10 room reservation fee is due when the student 
receives her appointment for admission to the College. There 
will be no refund of this fee after August 15. 

In addition to the above, for students taking private instruc- 
tion in all departments of Applied Music, Instrumental or 
Special Vocal Music, for each course; 

On entrance $ 15.00 

November 15 15.00 

January 15 15.00 

March 15 15.00 

$ 60.00 

Fee For the Use of Practice Piano or Voice Practice : 

Juniors and Seniors in B.S. in Music Course, $18.00 for the 
year. 

Freshmen and Sophomores in B.S. in Music Course, $14.00 
for the year. 

Other Music students, $9.00 for the year. 

Fee For Organ Practice: 

One hour per week on the three manual organ, $9.00 for the 

year. 
One hour per week on the two manual organ, $5.00 for the 

year. 
One hour per week on the two manual and pedal reed organ, 

$1.75 for the year. 
One hour per week on the pedal piano, $1.75 for the year. 



Expenses 45 

Fee For Violin and Other Orchestral Instruments, Practice 
Room: 

Freshmen and Sophomores in B.S. in Music, $7.00 for the 

year. 
Juniors and Seniors in B.S. in Music, $9.00 for the year. 
Other Violin students, $4.50 for the year. 
A special fee of $45.00 for the year is charged for the two 

courses, Music 335 and 336. 

Payments For New Students Entering the Second Semester: 

For Students Who Board in Dormitories: 

In State Out State 

On entrance $ 95.00 $ 127.50 

March 15 86.00 116.00 



$ 181.00 $ 243.50 

For Students Who Do Not Board in Dormitories: 

In State Out State 

On entrance $ 40.00 $ 72.50 

March 15 28.00 58.00 



$ 68.00 $130.50 

LABORATORY FEES 

To defray the cost of materials consumed by the student in her 
laboratory work, certain fees, ranging in amount from $1.00 to $8.00, 
according to the course taken, will be charged. These fees must be 
paid on the day of registration, and no student may be enrolled in 
a course until the required fee is paid. These fees are listed in the 
course descriptions appearing elsewhere in the catalogue. (See Art, 
Biology, Chemistry, Commercial Department, Home Economics, 
Physics, Play Production, Psychology, and Education.) 

OTHER NECESSARY EXPENSES 

Additional expenses at the college will be the cost of text-books, 
gymnasium outfit, diagnostic X-ray films, and for graduates, a fee 
of $7.50. 

SPECIAL BUSINESS COURSES 

To any student not boarding in the dormitories, the charges for a 
special course in Stenography will be $50.00 for tuition, and the 
regular fees, $71.00, and a laboratory fee of $2.00 for each semester. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students who register for some form of Applied Music only (Piano, 
Organ, Voice, Violin) pay $75.00. This is payable $45.00 on en- 
trance, $30.00 at the beginning of the spring semester. 



46 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

TEXT-BOOKS 

The students are required to purchase their text-books. For their 
convenience the College will maintain a depository where all neces- 
sary books may be had at list prices. Students are advised to bring 
a good English dictionary and other useful reference books in their 
possession. English, Latin, French, and German lexicons, when 
needed must be purchased by the student. 

In all business matters, the College prefers to deal directly with the 
students rather than with their parents or guardians. This gives 
the students business experience and makes them realize the cost of 
their training. 

All students are supposed to matriculate for the full year, and must 
not expect any fees or dues remitted on account of their irregulari- 
ties or change in plans, except in case of serious illness, making it 
necessary for the resident physician to advise them to return home. 
All checks and money orders should be made payable to E. J. For- 
ney, Treasurer. 



Loan Funds, Fellowships, 
And Scholarships 



The Students' Loan Fund was established in 1892-1893. It is made 
up of funds given by a number of individuals. Among these are the 
following: Mr. and Mrs. Josephus Daniels, who gave the Adelaide 
Worth Daniels Fund; Mrs. J. C. Buxton; General and Mrs. Julian 
S. Carr; Charles Broadway Rouss; and Mr. and Mrs. V. Everit 
Macy. This fund now amounts to $6,145.24. 

The Alumnae Loan and Scholarship Fund. For the purpose of 
making loans to worthy students, chiefly in the higher classes, who 
could not return to college without aid, the Alumnae Association has 
raised a fund. This fund amounts to $25,957.70. 

The McIver Loan Fund. As a memorial to the founder and first 
president of the College, the Alumnae Association raised the McIver 
Loan Fund, now amounting to $11,118.31. 

The Bryant Loan Fund. The Bryant Loan Fund of $7,500 be- 
queathed to the College by the late Victor S. Bryant, of Durham, 
North Carolina, is in constant use. Notes made from this loan fund 
bear 6 per cent interest from the date of the loan. 

Mollie K. Fetzer Loan Fund. This loan fund was established by 
T. J. Fetzer as a memorial to his sister. It is now $456.65. 

Elizabeth Crow Mahler Loan Fund. This fund was established 
by Miss Sue May Kirkland, the first woman principal of the College, 
in memory of her niece. This fund is now $222.98. 

The Ida Haughton Cowan Loan Fund. Miss Ida H. Cowan, Class 
of 1902, gave a loan fund in memory of her mother. It is now $126.13. 

Doris Wright Memorial Fund. This fund of $1,000 was contri- 
buted by friends of the late C. C. Wright, Superintendent of Educa- 
tion in Wilkes County. This is used for aiding students from Wilkes 
County. It is now $1,594.95. 

The Musgrove Memorial Fund. Mrs. Jeanette Musgrove Bounds, 
Class of 1914, established a loan fund of $100 in memory of her 
father. It is now $143.09. 

Mary Foust and Caroline McNeill Loan Fund has been estab- 
lished by Dr. J. I. Foust, President Emeritus, and Mrs. J. I. Foust, 
jointly, in memory of Mary Foust Armstrong and Caroline McNeill. 
The fund is now $1,833.95. 

Rebecca Christine Phoenix Memorial Loan Fund. This was 
established in 1932 by Mr. John J. Phoenix and family in memory 
of his daughter. It is now $249.64. 



48 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

The Lily Connally Morehead Loan Fund. Mrs. Lily C. Mebane, 
of Spray, North Carolina, has given $4,170 as a nucleus of a loan 
fund in memory of her mother. The fund is now $4,807.41. 

The Daphne Carraway Memorial Loan Fund. Miss Irma Carra- 
way, Class of 1897, established this loan fund in memory of her sister, 
Daphne Carraway, Class of 1902. In granting these loans, graduates 
of the Barium Springs Orphanage have the preference. The amount 
of this fund is $519.23. 

The Royal Arch and Knights Templar Loan Fund was estab- 
lished in the fall of 1921. It is now $2,571.78. 

The Masonic Loan Fund was established in 1922. It is now 
$6,043.68. 

The Masonic Theatre Educational Loan Fund of New Bern. 
The Scottish Rite Masons of Eastern North Carolina have contri- 
buted a loan fund of $200. It is now $245.44. 

The Home Economics Club has established a loan fund. The fund 
now amounts to $50. 

The Class of 1925 established a loan fund of $100. It is now $138.55. 

Class of 1929 Loan Fund. The Class of 1929 established a loan fund 
of $350. 

The Class of 1932 gave a fund of $150 to be used as a loan until the 
Organ Fund is raised. It will then go to the Organ Fund. 

The Class of 1933 has given $75 as a loan fund. 

The Class of 1935 has given a fund to be used as a loan. It is now 
$319.32. 

The Class of 1936 has established a loan fund of $275.02. This will 
be used for loans until the Organ Fund is raised. It will then go to 
the Organ Fund. 

The Class of 1938 has established a loan fund. It amounts to $23.49. 

The Commercial Class of 1935 established a fund to be used as a 
loan fund until the Organ Fund is raised. It will then go to the 
Organ Fund. The fund amounts to $19.96. 

Student Government Fund of 1935. This fund was established as 
a loan fund until the Organ Fund is raised. It will then go to the 
Organ Fund. It amounts to $200.88. 

The North Carolina Association of Jewish Women established 



Loan Funds, Fellowships and Scholarships 49 

a loan fund for emergency aid to students in case of serious illness. 
It is now $255.86. 

Miss Jessie McLean has given $50 to be used as a loan for students 
needing special medical attention. It is now $68.14. 

Students of the Sallie Southall Cotten Hall have established 
a loan fund now amounting to $46.28. 

Mrs. James Boyd, Southern Pines, N. C, has contributed $300 to be 
used as a loan fund. 

The Buncombe County Alumnae Association has given $25 as a 
loan fund. 

The Laura H. Coit Loan Fund is being given by the students of the 
College. It is now $3,366.78. 

The Carrie MacRae Tillett Memorial Loan Fund. The late Mrs. 
C. W. Tillett of Charlotte, North Carolina, from 1933 to 1935 donated 
$100 yearly to the College for a gift scholarship. In September, 1935, 
.e founded the Carrie MacRae Tillett Memorial Loan Fund with an 
initial gift of $100. This fund is available for Juniors and Seniors, 
preferably Seniors. It is a memorial to Mrs. Tillett's small daughter, 
Carrie MacRae Tillett. 

The Katharine Mavity Martin Loan Fund. The faculty wives 
through their organization have given to the College the Katharine 
Mavity Martin Loan Fund of $215.95 for use in emergencies. This 
fund is a memorial to Mrs. Katharine Mavity Martin, wife of W. W. 
Martin, Professor of Psychology at the College. 

The Hennie Bynum Fund. The late Judge John Gray Bynum be- 
queathed to the College $1,000, the income from which is used to aid 
young women from the Presbyterian Church of Morganton, North 
Carolina. 

The Mina Weil Endowment Fund. Mrs. Janet Weil Bluethenthal 
has established an endowment of $6,000 in honor of her mother. The 
income from this fund is granted for scholarships. 

The Mendenhall Scholarship. Miss Gertrude Whittier Menden- 
hall, head of the Department of Mathematics from the founding of 
the College until her death in 1926, left to the College a fund of 
$2,091.41 to endow a scholarship to be named in honor of her aunt, 
Judith J. Mendenhall. 

The will provides that a faculty committee award the scholarship 
annually to a deserving student "who has made good records in 
preparatory and freshman mathematics and who desires to do higher 
work in mathematics and allied sciences." 



50 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

The United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarships. The 
North Carolina Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy 
offers eight scholarships to descendants of Confederate veterans. 
These scholarships are worth $130 to $150 each. 

The Children of the Confederacy offer two scholarships of $130 
each. 

Henry Weil Fellowship Fund. Mrs. Henry Weil of Goldsboro, 
North Carolina, established at the College in memory of her husband 
a fund of $16,000, known as the Henry Weil Fellowship Fund. 

(1) The Henry Weil Fellowship shall be awarded each year to a 
member of the graduating class, but if there is no member of the 
class who meets the conditions of award, the committee shall 
have the right to award the fellowship to a member of any class 
graduating within the preceding five years. 

(2) A committee shall be appointed by the Dean of Administration 
to assist in making the award. 

The Liberty Hall Chapter, D.A.R., Membership Memorial Loan 
Fund. This loan fund was established in June, 1935. It is available 
to Juniors and Seniors. The fund amounts to $1,717.00. 

The Camilla Croom Rodman Scholarships. Col. W. B. Rodman of 
Norfolk, Virginia, has established two scholarships in memory of 
his mother. The donor reserves the right to select the beneficiaries 
of these scholarships, one of which is to be awarded to a student from 
Hyde County and the other to a student from the State at large. 

Mrs. W. O. Nisbet of Charlotte, N. C, has established the Claude 
Heath Loan Fund in memory of her brother, Mr. Claude Heath. The 
fund amounts to $100. 

Mr. J. B. Ivey of Charlotte, N. C, has given $100 to be known as 
The J. B. Ivey Student Loan Fund. 

The Sarah Atkinson Loan Fund has been established by the Class 
of 1939 and the Art Club as a memorial to Sarah Atkinson, a mem- 
ber of the Class of 1939. Family, friends, and students have con- 
tributed to the fund to the extent of $226.00. This will be used to aid 
worthy art students. 

The General Medical Fund of $171.75 has been established for 
use as a loan fund for emergency aid to students needing special 
medical attention. 

The Alumnae Class Organ Fund amounting to $418.80 has been 



Loan Funds, Fellowships and Scholarships 51 

established as a loan fund until the Organ Fund is raised. This will 
then go to the Organ Fund. 

The Washington, D. C, Alumnae Chapter has established a loan 
fund of $200.00. 

The Eunice Kirkpatrick Rankin Loan Fund. This fund of $100.00 
has been established by the Atlanta Alumnae Club, in memory of 
Mrs. Rankin, a member of the Class of 1901, and a former president 
of this club. The fund is to be used preferably, but not necessarily, 
to aid a student from Georgia. 

The Winfield Endowment. Miss Martha Elizabeth Winfield, for 
many years a professor of English in the College, left an endowment 
of $3,000. The income is awarded each year as a scholarship to a 
Junior or Senior of promise in the English Department who is in need 
of financial assistance. 

Escheats Fund. According to State law, clerks of court are direct- 
ed to forward to the University money included in estates for which 
no heir can be discovered. For these funds the University is merely 
custodian for a period of years during which any heir discovered may 
legally claim the funds. During this period the money is placed in 
the Student Loan Funds as a temporary investment. The Woman's 
College of the University of North Carolina participates in this fund. 



IV. Admission 



Applicants for admission to the College should be sixteen years of 
age. 

Students are admitted by certificate or by examination. Those ad- 
mitted by certificate must be graduates of standard high schools and 
must be recommended by the school ; those admitted by examination 
must have completed the equivalent of a four-year high school course 
and must pass the uniform College Entrance Examination arranged 
by the North Carolina College Conference. Deficiencies may be al- 
lowed in foreign language, mathematics, or history, provided the ap- 
plicant offers 15 acceptable units. Such deficiencies must be removed 
before the student may register as a sophomore. 

The College reserves the right to reject any applicant who ranked 
in the lower half of her high school graduating class. It must be 
generally understood, too, that admission to the College does not 
carry admission to candidacy for a degree. In order to be admitted 
as a candidate for a degree, the applicant must meet the specific re- 
quirements laid down for that degree. 

A report from the applicant's physician is required. Blanks for such 
statements will be mailed to applicants and must be returned to the 
college physician when the application for admission is submitted. 

Early application is advisable. Rooms in the residence halls are as- 
signed in order of application, and applications cannot be accepted 
after all rooms are assigned. 

Application forms will be furnished upon request. Communications 
concerning admission should be addressed to Miss Mildred P. Newton, 
Secretary of Admissions. 

SUBJECTS ACCEPTED FOR ENTRANCE 

The subjects in which credit for admission to the College may be 
offered and the maximum amount of credit accepted in each subject 
are given in the following table : 

Units 

English 4 

History and other Social Sciences 4 

Mathematics 4 

Greek 3 

*Latin 4 

*French 3 

*German 3 

* Spanish 2 

Biology 1 

* Credit will not be given for less than two years of a foreign language. 






Prescribed Requirements 53 



Botany 1 

Chemistry 1 

Physics 1 

Physiology % 

Zoology 1 

General Science 1 

General or Physical Geography 1 

Art 1 

Civics 1 

Bible , 2 

Music 2 

Public Speaking V2 

VOCATIONAL SUBJECTS 

Not more than three elective units will be accepted from this list of 
vocational subjects: 

Units 

Commercial Geography V2 

Bookkeeping 1 

Commercial Arithmetic 1 

Stenography 1 

Home Economics 2 

PRESCRIBED REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for admission to candidacy for the different de- 
gress are as follows : 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Units 

English (four years) 4 

Algebra (one and one-half years) IV2 

Plane Geometry (one year) 1 

Foreign Language (two years in one language) 2 

History (two years) 2 

Electives ( 1 ) 4% 

15 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Home Economics, Physical Education, Secretarial Administration 

Units 

English (four years) 4 

Algebra (one and one-half years) l 1 ^ 

Plane Geometry (one year) 1 

Foreign Language (two years in one language) 2 

History (two years) 2 

**Science 1 

Electives (1) 3 % 

15 

** Not required for Secretarial Administration. 



54 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Bachelor of Science in Music 

Units 

English (four years) „.... 4 

Algebra (one and one-half years) 1^ 

Plane Geometry (one year) 1 

***Foreign Language (three years in one language) 3 

History (two years) 2 

Music (2) 2 

Electives ( 1 ) 1 % 

15 

(1) Electives: The elective units in each case must be chosen from 
the list of "Subjects Accepted for Entrance." It is strongly 
urged and recommended that elective units be made up from 
the fields of mathematics (second-year algebra for a full year, 
solid geometry for a half year, and plane trigonometry for a 
half year), social science (ancient history, mediaeval and mod- 
ern history, modern history, English history, American his- 
tory, American history and civics as a combination, civics, 
sociology, and economics), foreign language (Spanish, German, 
French, Latin, and Greek, with not fewer than two units in 
any one), and science with full laboratory (chemistry, physics, 
biology, botany, zoology, geology, physiography, and general 
science) . One unit is allowed for a full year's work in any one 
of the named sciences, provided lectures or recitations and labo- 
ratory work are involved ; if no laboratory work is included, any 
one of the named sciences, taken for a full year, carries only 
a half unit credit. A credit of less than a half unit will not be 
allowed in any subject. 

(2) MUSIC: 1 or 2 units. One unit of music may be offered as an 
elective for entrance to any College course. To satisfy the re- 
quirements of one unit credit in any course except that of B.S. 
in Music, a student must offer one of the following: 

a. Rudiments of Music and Harmony: Not less than thirty- 
two weeks' work, of five forty-minute recitations each week. 
Suggested Texts: Music Notation and Terminology — K. W. 
Gehrkens (A. S. Barnes and Co.) and Harmony for the Ear, 
Eye, and Keyboard — Arthur Heacox (0. Ditson Co.) 

b. Harmony and History of Music: Not less than thirty-two 
weeks' work, of five forty-minute recitations each week. It 
is suggested that three recitations each week can be de- 
voted to the study of notation and harmony, as suggested for 
Course I, and the remaining two days be used in a careful 
study of history of music, including, if possible, some ex- 
perience in intelligent listening to representative composi- 
tion of the period of composer under consideration. A well- 
kept notebook for the work in music history is strongly urged. 
Suggested Texts: For harmony — the same as for Course I. 
History — History of Music — Cecil Forsyth (Art Publication 
Society) . 

c. Elementary Theory: Together with a usable knowledge of 



*** Three years in one language or two each in two languages. 



Prescribed Requirements 55 

piano or violin. This elementary theory must include, as a 
minimum, a knowledge of the rudiments of music; scales 
(major and minor), intervals and staff notation, and mu- 
sical terms and expression marks in common use. In the 
practical music presented for this unit of credit, the student 
must offer one of the following: 

Piano: The ability to play effectively the Sonatinas of 
Clementi and Kuhlau, or compositions of like grade, 
and the bility to play well standard church hymns. 

Violin: The ability to play well scales and compositions cov- 
ering the first three positions. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Students entering with advanced standing must fulfill the require- 
ments for admission to the Freshman Class. 

Applicants for admission from other colleges should send to the 
Registrar: (1) an official statement of entrance and college records; 
(2) a catalogue of the institution from which they transfer, marked 
to indicate the courses taken; and (3) a statement of honorable dis- 
missal. It is desirable that the official transcript of the applicant's 
entrance and college record of work to the end of the first semester 
of the year prior to her transfer be sent to the Registrar before May 
1. This certificate should include a statement of the subjects being 
pursued during the second semester, together with the number of 
hours of credit to be secured in each. The letter of honorable dis- 
missal and the final record of the second semester should be sent to 
the Registrar before July 1. 

In estimating the credit to be allowed, the standing of the college pre- 
viously attended and the quality as well as the quantity of the stu- 
dent's work will receive consideration. Should the student's work dur- 
ing her first year at this College prove unsatisfactory, the amount of 
credit allowed may be reduced. Students who transfer from junior 
colleges or from four- year colleges not affiliated with the Southern 
Association, or a similar regional association, must present labora- 
tory notebooks in all science courses that are offered for advanced 
credit. 



V. Degrees 

Requirements For The Bachelor's Degree 

The College offers five courses of study leading to the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. Unless given special 
permission to register for an irregular course, every student must 
take one of the courses leading to a degree. 

DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The minimum requirement! for the degree of Bachelor of Arts is 
the satisfactory completion of 122 semester hours which include 
the following:* 

English 1 12 semester hours 

Social Studies 3 12 semester hours 

Natural Sciences and 

Mathematics 3 12 semester hours 

Foreign Language (one) or a 

reading knowledge 4 12 semester hours 

Hygiene 3 semester hours 

Major subjects 3 24 to 42 semester hours 

Physical Education 2 semester hours 

The specified requirements for graduation except those in the major 
subject, ordinarily must be taken in the freshman and sophomore 
years. In exceptional cases a required subject may, with the con- 
sent of the adviser and the class chairman, be taken later than the 
freshman and sophomore years. 

English 101-102 and 211-212 must be taken to meet the requirement 
of six hours in composition and six in literature. Freshmen whose 
level of proficiency in English composition is below the required 
standard shall be enrolled in a course without credit until the re- 
quired standard is attained. 

Any upperclass student whose work in any course gives evidence of 
lack of proficiency in written English shall be brought to the atten- 
tion of a committee from the English Department. The committee 
after investigating the student's work will arrange for the re- 
moval of the deficiency and will determine when the deficiency has 
been removed. Proficiency in written and spoken English is a re- 
quirement for graduation. 



2 Six hours must be in History (usually History 101-102); the re- 

t In addition to the minimum of 120 semester hours, every candidate for a degree 
must present 204 Quality Points. For an explanation of this requirement see page 
72. 

* For the removal of requirements by proficiency examinations see page 69. 



Requirements for the Bachelor Degree 57 

maining six may be in History, Government, Economics, or Sociology. 

8 Six hours of a laboratory science (Biology, Chemistry, or Physics 
are required; the remaining six may be in Mathematics (101-102 
or 103-104) or a laboratory science. Psychology 211-212 may be 
taken to meet the science requirement by sophomores who are not 
preparing to teach. 

*To prove a reading knowledge of a language, the student must take 
an examination, the results of which will be judged by accuracy in 
understanding the passages read. For such an examination college 
instruction in the language is not essential, but in general three 
years of study of the language in a secondary school, or the equiva- 
lent, supplemented by intensive reading during the summer pre- 
ceding the examination will be necessary. 

5 For departmental majors the requirement is not less than 24 
semester hours and not more than 36 above Grade I. For interde- 
partmental majors which include work in two departments the 
minimum total in all major subjects is 36 semester hours above 
Grade I; for interdepartmental majors which include work in 
three departments the minimum total is 42 semester hours. 

All courses are classified in five grades. Those courses primarily 
for freshmen and sophomores are designated as Grade I; those 
primarily for sophomores as Grade II; those primarily for juniors 
and seniors as Grade III; those for seniors as Grade IV; and those 
for graduate students as Grade V. Freshmen are admitted to 
courses of Grade II and sophomores to those of Grade III only 
by special permission, given by the class chairman and the in- 
structor concerned. For a student beginning a language in college 
a second course in that language would be Grade II. 

Students preparing to be laboratory technicians and pre-medical 
students are advised to take two sciences each year in both fresh- 
man and sophomore years. 

Students who plan to major in Mathematics and who wish to se- 
cure a certificate to teach General Science also are advised to 
choose both Mathematics and a science in the freshman year. 
Freshmen may take four semester hours of Applied Music of col- 
lege grade. Thereafter, all courses in Applied Music shall be 
paralleled by an equal number of hours in the Theory of Music. 

After a student has fulfilled the language requirements for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree, she may take for credit one year of a 
foreign language. 

Students preparing to take the interdepartmental major in gram- 



58 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

mar grade or in primary teaching are advised to elect Psychology 
221-222, History 211 or 212, and if possible Biology 235 in the 
sophomore year. 

Fields of Concentration 

In her junior and senior years each candidate for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts must complete a considerable amount of work in 
a field of concentration. The selection of the field for intensive 
study shall be made by the student after consultation with her 
class chairman not later than the second semester of her sopho- 
more year. Freshmen and sophomores who know in what field 
they desire to major should, through their class chairman, get in 
touch with the special adviser in their field as early as possible. 
The responsibility for courses in the field of concentration up to 
the minimum number of hours required for concentration shall 
rest with the head of the department concerned in the departmental 
major and with the faculty group in the interdepartmental major. 
For work beyond this minimum requirement the class chairman is 
responsible. 

Students desiring to teach are advised to fulfill the requirements 
of the State Department of Public Instruction for the certificate 
in the state in which they expect to teach. For students preparing 
to teach in high school, 15 semester hours of Education may be 
credited on the Bachelor of Arts degree; for those preparing to 
teach in the grammar grades, 19 semester hours; for those pre- 
paring to teach in the primary grades, 18 semester hours. 

Courses fulfilling the requirements for graduation in the fields of 
concentration shall be above Grade I. At least 36 of the student's 
last 60 hours shall be of Grade III or IV, and not more than 12 
of the last 60 may be of Grade I. When, however, this regulation 
shall work a special hardship upon a student, adjustments will be 
made by the class chairman and the student's adviser. 
The curriculum provides two types of majors in the field of con- 
centration as follows: 

I. Departmental Major 

The departmental major lies within one department. The follow- 
ing departments offer an opportunity for major work: Art, Biology, 
Chemistry, English, Economics, History and Political Science, 
French, German, Greek, Latin, Mathematics, Music, Physics, Psy- 
chology, Sociology, Spanish. 

A student must take not less than 24 nor more than 36 semester 
hours above Grade I in the major subject. With the approval of 
the major department adviser and her class chairman, however, 



Requirements for the Bachelor Degree 59 

she may choose part of the major work from closely related de- 
partments. 

II. Interdepartmental Majors 

Interdepartmental majors include work in two or three depart- 
ments so arranged that the student's efforts may be directed to- 
ward a more comprehensive understanding of a field of knowledge. 
When the interdepartmental major includes work in two depart- 
ments, not less than 15 semester hours nor more than 21 shall be 
offered in one subject, the minimum total to be 36 semester hours 
above Grade I. When the major includes work in three depart- 
ments, not less than 9 semester hours in a subject shall count on the 
major, the minimum total to be 42 semester hours. 

The following interdepartmental majors are now offered: labora- 
tory technician, pre-medical, primary or grammar grade teaching. 
Others are to be arranged. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Beginning with the Class of 1940 a comprehensive examination in 
the field of concentration shall be required of all candidates for 
graduation. The aim of such an examination is to provide a 
measure of the student's success in achieving a general mastery 
of the field as a whole. Since the examination is not considered 
as an end in itself, however, special emphasis shall be placed upon 
the preparation for it, such preparation to include among other 
things a coordinating course in the field of concentration which 
shall serve to stimulate a better correlation of course material 
and a better view of the field as a whole. The comprehensive 
examination which will be given during the student's senior year 
will not take the place of all course examinations at the end of that 
year, but may serve to exempt the student from one or more such 
examinations in her field of concentration at that time. The com- 
prehensive examination shall count in part, but shall not be the 
determining factor in granting the degree. 

Honors Courses 

Plans are under way for the gradual adoption of honors courses 
for the exceptional student. Such courses will be pursued in the 
field of concentration during the senior year and will be under the 
direction of the member of the faculty in the field of concentration 
best suited to direct them. At the end of the year the student 
who has pursued the honors course must take an examination 
in the field of concentration. A student who pursues an honors 
course with distinction and passes the examination with distinc- 
tion will be graduated with honors in the field of concentration. 



60 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR 

OF SCIENCE 

1. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC 

See School of Music, page 157. 

2. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

The minimum requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Home Economics is the satisfactory completion of 122 semester 
hours as outlined below. 

The Home Economics Department offers several curricula organ- 
ized to meet specialized subject matter interests and to meet the 
requirements of official groups responsible for the accrediting of 
professional training courses. 

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for the freshman and sophomore years are uni- 
form for the several curricula. 

SEM. SEM. 

Freshman Year HRS. Sophomore Year hrs. 

Chemistry 101-102 or Biology 101-102 6 

103-104 6 Chemistry 231-332 or 

English 101-102 6 Art 103-241* 6 

Foreign Language 6 English 211-212 6 

History 101-102 6 Foreign Language 6 

Home Economics 101 3 Home Economics 203 and 

Art 101 3 205 6 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

31 31 

*Only students majoring in Clothing and Textile Design and 
The House and Its Furnishings will take Art 103 and 241. 

JUNIOR-SENIOR REQUIREMENTS 

The following courses are required in all the Home Economics 
curricula : 

SEM. HRS. 

Economics 325 3 

Psychology 221 3 

Sociology 321 3 

Home Economics 302, 325, 405 and 412 9 

18 
The other 42 hours to complete the required 60 are distributed as 
follows in the several curricula: 



Courses Leading to Bachelor's Degree 



61 



A. General Home Economics 



SEM. HRS. 

Physics 301 3 

Home Economics 301 3 

Home Economics 303 3 

Home Economics 311 3 

Home Economics 313 3 

Home Economics 415 2 

Electives 25 



B. Clothing and Textiles 

1. Design 

2. Economics 



General requirements 
for either 1 or 2 

SEM. 
HRS. 

Home Economics 301 3 

Home Economics 311 3 

Home Economics 321 3 

Home Economics 401 3 

Home Economics 461 3 



15 

27 



42 



42 



Additional requirements 
for 1 only 

SEM. 
HRS. 

Art 224 3 

Physics 301 3 

Home Economics 331 3 

Home Economics 411 3 

Electives 15 



27 



Additional requirements 
for 2 only 



Economics 336 3 

Physics 101-102 6 

Home Economics 441 3 

Electives 15 



27 



62 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



C. Foods and Nutrition 

1. Nutrition 

2. Food Economics 



General requirements 
for either 1 or 2 

SEM. 
HRS. 

Science Elective 3 

Home Economics 303 3 

Home Economics 313 3 

Home Economics 323 3 

Home Economics 415 2 

Home Economics 433 3 

17 
25 



Additional requirements 
for 1 only 

SEM. 
HRS. 

Physics 301 3 

Home Economics 403 3 

Home Economics 413 3 

Electives 16 



25 



42 



Additional requirements 
for 2 only 

SEM. 
HRS. 

Physics 101-102 6 

Home Economics 447 2 

Home Economics 309 3 

Electives 14 



25 



D. Housing 

1. The House and Its Furnishings 

2. Household Equipment 

General requirements 
for either 1 or 2 

SEM. 
HRS. 

Home Economics 461 3 

Home Economics 305 2 

Home Economics 455 3 



34 

42 



Courses Leading to Bachelor's Degree 63 

Additional requirements Additional requirements 

for 1 only for 2 only 

SEM. SEM. 

HRS. HRS. 

Art 224 3 Economics 336 3 

Art 257 3 Physics 101-102 6 

Physics 301 3 Home Economics 415 2 

Home Economics 315 3 Home Economics 303 3 

Home Economics 421 3 Home Economics 445 2 

Home Economics 431 3 Electives 18 

Home Economics 435 3 

Electives 13 34 

34 

E. Home Relationships and Child Development 

SEM. HRS. 

Physics 301 3 

Psychology 326 3 

Psychology 337 3 

Psychology 348 3 

Sociology 333 3 

Home Economics 303 3 

Home Economics 313 3 

Home Economics 413 3 

Home Economics 417 3 

Home Economics 437 3 

Home Economics 451 2 

Electives 10 

42 

F. Education 

1. Teacher Training 

2. Cooperative Extension Service 

Requirements for 1 and 2 

SEM. HRS. 

Physics 301 3 

Psychology 222 3 

Home Economics 301 3 

Home Economics 303 3 

Home Economics 307 2 

Home Economics 311 3 

Home Economics 313 3 

Home Economics 407 2 

Home Economics 415 2 

Home Economics 467 3 

*Electives 15 

42 



* Electives should be carefully selected to meet state requirements for teaching 
certification. 



64 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

G. Institution Economics 

1. Institution Food Service 

a. Hospital Dietetics 

b. College Food Service 

c. School Lunchroom Management 

d. Club, Tea Room and Restaurant Management 

2. Institution House Administration 

General requirements 
for either 1 or 2 

SEM. 
HRS. 

Physics 301 3 

Economics 338 2 

Home Economics 303 3 

Home Economics 309 3 

Home Economics 313 3 

Home Economics 419 2 

Home Economics 420 2 

Home Economics 429 3 

Home Economics 430 3 

24 

*Electives 18 

42 



* Electives should be carefully selected to meet entrance requirements of ap- 
proved hospital training centers for dietitians. 



Courses Leading to Bachelor's Degree 



65 



3. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



freshman 



sem. 

HRS. 



English 101-102 6 

History 101-102 6 

Biology 101-102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Hygiene 101 and Elective ... 6 

Physical Education 111-112 1 



31 



SOPHOMORE 



SEM. 
HRS. 



English 211-212 6 

Chemistry 101-102 or 

103-104 6 

Foreign Language 

(second year) 6 

Psychology 221-222 6 

Physical Education 241 3 

Elective 3 

Physical Education 211-212 1 



31 



SEM. 

JUNIOR HRS. 

Biology 371 3 - 

Physical Education 

351-352 3 2 

Physical Education 

359-360 2 2 

Physical Education 376 - 3 

Hygiene 236 1 - 

Home Economics 213 - 3 

Education 3 3 

*Electives 3 2 



15 15 



SENIOR 

Biology 277-378 3 

Sociology 321-326 3 

Physical Education 

461-462 2 

Physical Education 

463-464 2 

Physical Education 

465-466 2 

Health Education 467 ... 2 
Physical Education 468 - 
Physical Education 

469-470 1 

Physical Education 

Practice 



SEM. 

HRS. 
3 
3 



15 15 



In addition to the hours of academic credit, Physical Education 
major students are required to complete the following hours in 
Physical Education: 



freshman 

First Semester P.E. 101 \ Jockey and Soccer 

J Swimming, Gymnastics 

/Swimming, Gymnastics 
Second Semester P.E. 102 <[ Baseball, Track 

(.Stunts, Rhythms 



SOPHOMORES 

First Semester 



{Soccer, Speedball 
Fieldball, Basketball 
Social Dancing, Swimming 

/Basketball, Folk Dancing 
Second Semester P.E. 212< Recreational Sports, Tap 

(Archery 



1 2 Ms hours 
>3 hours 

} 

} 



3 hours 



3 hours 



* Elective hours must be chosen from the division of Language and Literature 
and the Social Studies. 



6Q 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



juniors 

( Coaching, Tennis \ 

First Semester P.E. 369< Gymnastic Teaching >3 hours 

I Child Rhythms ) 

f Coaching, Folk Dance } 

Second Semester P.E. 370 < Marching and Apparatus >3 hours 

(Modern Dance ) 

SENIORS 

i Officiating \ 

First Semester P.E. 469 fcpleShip \™ h °- 

(Swimming, Mod. Dance ) 

( Officiating, Life Saving \ 

Second Semester P.E. 470 < Modern Dance, Festivals >2Vz hours 

(.Elective ) 



4. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SECRETARIAL ADMINISTRATION 

The Department of Secretarial Administration offers two courses, 
with variations in the Junior-Senior years of each which make it 
possible for students to prepare for various kinds of positions. 

FRESHMAN-SOPHOMORE REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for the first two years are uniform for both 
courses. 



SEM. 

Freshman Year hrs. 

English 101-102 6 

History 101-102 6 

Foreign Language* 6 

Science or Mathematics 6 

Hygiene 101 and Elective 6 

Physical Education 1 



SEM. 

Sophomore Year hrs. 

English 211-212 6 

Economics 211-212 6 

Economics 233-234 6 

Geography 237 and His- 
tory 212 6 

Foreign Language * or 

Elective 6 

Secretarial Science 211-212 2 

Physical Education 1 



31 



33 



* A student choosing to take only one year of foreign language in college must 
continue a foreign language offered for entrance. 



Courses Leading to Bachelor's Degree 67 

JUNIOR-SENIOR REQUIREMENTS 

A. Secretarial Course 

The courses in Economics and Secretarial Science may be chosen so 
as to give satisfactory preparation for such positions as stenog- 
rapher, private secretary, and general office worker. 
Of the 58 hours to be taken in the junior and senior years the 
following 35 are required: 

Secretarial Science 311-312 2 

Secretarial Science 321-322 8 

Secretarial Science 423 4 

Secretarial Science 424 3 

Secretarial Science 426 3 

Secretarial Science 431 3 

Economics 431-432 6 

Political Science 321 3 

Psychology 221 3 

35 
The remaining 23 hours of electives are to be chosen in consulta- 
tion with the Adviser in charge of the program of study. 

B. Business Teacher-Training Course 

This course offers preparation for teaching and supervisory posi- 
tions in secondary Business Education. It is planned to meet 
North Carolina certification requirements. With the proper se- 
lection of electives, it will be possible to meet the certification re- 
quirements of other states for specialized teachers of: (1) book- 
keeping and accounting; (2) stenographic and secretarial sub- 
jects; (3) salesmanship and merchandising. 

Of the 58 hours to be taken in the junior and senior years the fol- 
lowing are required: 

sem. hrs. 

Psychology 221-222 6 

Secretarial Science 311-312, 321-322, 423 14 

Secretarial Science 424, 431 6 

Education 350 3 

Education 459 or 467 3 

Education 461 3 

Electives in Education 6 

41 

The above courses enable the student to meet the North Carolina 
certification requirements of 15 semester hours of Education and 
36 semester hours of Business courses. The remaining hours of 
Business and of unrestricted electives will be chosen in consultation 
with the student's adviser. 



VI. Academic Regulations 
Registration 

FRESHMAN WEEK 

In order to aid new students in becoming adjusted to college life 
as quickly as possible, the College has established Freshman Week. 
The program of this week includes mental and physical measure- 
ments, pre-registration counseling, special lectures on student tra- 
ditions, library tours, and social gatherings, in addition to the 
registration for courses. This program begins with a meeting of 
all new students in Aycock Auditorium at 9:00 a.m. on Tuesday, 
September 10. Freshmen and transfer students — all new students 
except commercial students — are required to be present at this and 
all other appointments comprising the program of Freshman Week. 
Freshmen and Commercial students will register September 12, 1940. 
Former and transfer students will register September 13, 1940. 

THE ACADEMIC AND PERSONNEL COMMITTEE 

Guidance of students in academic and extracurricular matters is 
administered through the Academic and Personnel Committee. This 
committee is composed of the four Class Chairmen and five other 
members of the Faculty, with the Dean of Women as chairman. The 
committee acts as a clearing agency between the faculty and stu- 
dents in academic matters. 

CLASS CHAIRMEN AND ACADEMIC ADVISERS 

There is a Class Chairman for each of the four classes, one Chair- 
man acting in an advisory capacity to the members of a specified 
class during its entire four years at the College. There are special 
advisers for small groups of freshmen and sophomores, and the heads 
of departments advise the juniors and seniors majoring in their 
particular departments. In this way each student has individual ad- 
vice concerning her academic work through her entire college course, 
under the direction of members of the Faculty thoroughly acquainted 
with her needs and interests. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

Not later than May 10 of the freshman, sophomore, and junior years, 
each student shall hand to the Registrar a copy of her program of 
study for the coming year. This program must have the official en- 
dorsement of the student's Adviser and her Class Chairman. 



Academic Regulations 



69 



The student herself is responsible for fulfilling all requirements for 
the degree for which she is registered. 

Every candidate for a Bachelor's degree must conform to the resi- 
dence requirements of this College. 

Without the permission of her Class Chairman no student may 
register for more than 16 hours of work in any semester, except un- 
der the following regulations: A.B. and B.S. students may register 
for two half-hour lessons per week in Applied Music (without credit) 
in addition to their regular work so long as they are doing satis- 
factory work in all subjects. 

Requests for permission to register for more than 16 hours should 
be handed to the Class Chairmen not later than May 1 for the first 
semester and December 12 for the second. All permissions for extra 
work are subject to the approval of the College Physician. 

No student may carry less than 12 hours of work. 

Change of Course, Changes in course should not be made after 
registration except in unusual cases. For one week following regis- 
tration a student may make necessary changes by presenting to the 
Registrar a change of course card signed by her Adviser and her 
Class Chairman. 

Students are not permitted to enter a course later than one week 
after registration. 

No student is officially dropped from a course until she has presented 
to the Registrar a "change of course" card signed by her Adviser and 
her Class Chairman. 

A course dropped after November 15 or after spring vacation shall 
be recorded as a failure. 

Proficiency Examinations. At matriculation or at the beginning 
or the close of any semester through the junior year until the re- 
quirement has been met, students shall be given an opportunity to 
take a proficiency examination in any course required in the fresh- 
man and sophomore years. No semester hours credit shall be given 
students for passing proficiency examinations on freshman courses, 
but in courses of sophomore grade and above, half credit shall be 
given a student who passes a proficiency examination. 

Students shall be relieved of requirements covered by the course or 
courses in which the examinations were taken and passed. 

Entrance Deficiencies. Graduates of approved high schools who 
offer the required fifteen units may be admitted to the College. To 
be admitted as a candidate for a degree, the student must meet the 



70 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

specific requirements laid down for that degree. If there are defi- 
ciencies, they must be made good before the student may register 
for her sophomore year. 

Auditing Courses. Auditing a course is allowed under the follow- 
ing conditions : 

1. No student may audit more than one course a semester. 

2. In order to audit a course a student: 

(a) must have the permission of the Faculty member whose 
course is to be audited; 

(b) must have the permission of her Class Chairman; 

(c) must register for the course in a fashion prescribed 
by the Registrar. 

3. A student auditing a course shall be required to meet the 
same attendance requirements as those taking the course for 
credit. 

4. A Faculty member may request that a student be dropped 
from a course if attendance requirements or other conditions 
set by him are not satisfactorily met. 

Credits. No student may receive credit for any course for which 
she has not officially registered and presented to the instructor a 
card of admission from the Registrar. 

Credit obtained by examination on new work during any term is 
counted as regular work in determining the amount of work car- 
ried by any student. 

No credit will be given for correspondence or extension work taken 
while a student is in residence at this College. 

Summer Session and Extension Credits. Students desiring to ap- 
ply toward their degrees work taken at the summer sessions of other 
colleges should confer with the Registrar of this College for permis- 
sion to take such courses. Credit will not be promised for courses 
not so approved. 

Summer session students (other than those who have matriculated 
during the regular year of the College) planning to apply their sum- 
mer session work toward a degree must file a record of their entrance 
credits with the Registrar of the College previous to matriculation. 
In general, students who wish to apply summer session work toward 
a degree shall fulfill the prerequisites laid down in the regular 
catalogue. 

Not more than one fourth of the requirement for a degree may be 
done by extension work, and not more than eight semester hours may 
be done in any one year. 



Academic Regulations 71 

Extension students desiring to apply the credit earned toward a de- 
gree must conform to the entrance requirements of the College. 
All questions of credit shall be referred to the Registrar and the 
Committee on Advanced Standing. 

Statements of Credits. Only one full statement of work and credit 
recorded for each student registered will be furnished without 
charge. Additional copies will be made only on receipt of a fee of 
one dollar ($1.00) to cover clerical expense involved. 

Classification. At the beginning of the College year the following 
minimum semester hours credit shall be required for the classifi- 
cation indicated. 

Seniors 84 semester hours 

Juniors 50 semester hours 

Sophomores 21 semester hours 

Freshmen 20 semester hours or less 

On recommendation of the appropriate Class Chairman, the Aca- 
demic and Personnel Committee may modify the foregoing regula- 
tions in the case of a meritorious student. 

Examinations. Every student is required to take an examination, 
if one is given, on every course for which she is registered. No exam- 
inations may be given except during the three regular examination 
periods of the year: September 11, and at the end of each semester: 

Examinations for the removal of conditions and for advanced stand- 
ing before the opening of the Fall semester will be held on Septem- 
ber 11, 1940. 

Requests for reexaminations must be made not later than the follow- 
ing times : 

September 1, for reexaminations to be taken on September 11. 

January 15, for reexaminations to be taken at the end of the 

first semester. 

May 15, for reexaminations to be taken at the end of the second 

semester. 

Blanks on which to apply for Fall reexaminations are sent from the 
Registrar's office during August. In January and May the stu- 
dent must file with her Class Chairman requests for reexaminations 
to be given at the close of the first and second semesters respectively. 

An E may be removed by reexamination before the beginning of the 
corresponding semester of the next year in which the student is in 
residence. If not removed, an E automatically becomes F. At the 
discretion of the instructor a condition received in the first half of 
a year course may also be removed by obtaining a grade of C in the 
last half of the course. Students receiving a grade of F must repeat 
the course in order to receive any credit for the course. 



72 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

The work for which an J has been given must be completed before 
the beginning of the corresponding semester of the next year in 
which the student is in residence; otherwise, the / automatically be- 
comes an F. 

Reports : A report of the student's work is mailed to the parent or 
guardian at the end of each semester. A report is also sent to each 
student at the end of each semester. The reports are based upon the 
following system of marking : 

A — Excellent. 

B— Good. 

C — Average. 

D — Lowest passing mark. 

E — Conditioned. 

F — Failure. 

I — Incomplete. 

Students must attain a grade of D to pass in any course. Grade E 
indicates that the student is conditioned, but will be given another 
opportunity to remove the deficiency. An F may be removed only 
by repeating the course. 

Quality Points. Every candidate for a degree must present, in ad- 
dition to a minimum of 120 semester hours, at least 204 quality 
points. The points are computed by giving the following values to 
the grades now in use : 

A 4 quality points C 2 quality points 

B 3 quality points D 1 quality points 

Residence Requirements. Not fewer than 42 of the last 60 semester 
hours required for the A.B. or B.S. degree shall be done at the Wo- 
man's College of the University of North Carolina. Of these 42 
semester hours, at least 30 shall be done in the regular sessions of 
the College from September to June. In general, 12 of these hours 
shall be devoted to subjects in the department of the student's major 
interest. 

Students who have successfully completed three years' work in a 
standard college and whose credits have been accepted by the College 
are required to do 30 rather than 42 hours in residence. 

The residence requirement may be met by substituting for the regu- 
lar session four nine weeks summer sessions at this college within 
a period of six years. 

Attendance. Excuses for all absences caused by illness must be 
secured from the college physicians as explained on page — . Stu- 
dents in the upper classes with a C average for the previous semester 



Academic Regulations 73 

are permitted unexcused absences to the number of credit hours 
which they are carrying, the absences to be distributed pro rata ac- 
cording to the number of hours credit per course. 

Freshmen are allowed no unexcused absences the first semester. The 
total number of hours credit of the student with more than the 
maximum number of unexcused absences will be reduced. 

Each student should read carefully the present regulations govern- 
ing all absences, which are set forth in detail in the booklet con- 
taining the Constitution, By-Laws, and Regulations of the Student 
Government Association ("The Blue Book") . 

Town students ill at their own homes should communicate with the 
college physician before returning to the campus, and should re- 
port at the Infirmary within 24 hours after their return, bringing a 
certificate of professional attendance signed by their home physician. 

Exclusion from College. During the first semester that a student 
is enrolled here, she must pass six hours of work to remain in col- 
lege. Every semester after the first, a student must pass nine hours 
to remain in college or to be readmitted. This regulation may be 
waived at the discretion of the Academic and Personnel Committee. 

This regulation does not take account of work that a student pro- 
poses to do during the summer session. 



VII. Courses of Instruction 



First semester courses are usually given odd numbers. 

Second semester courses are usually given even numbers. 

An r after a course number indicates that the course may be given 
either semester. 

A semester hour credit corresponds, unless otherwise stated, to an 
hour class period per week through one semester. 

The Roman number after the course represents its grade. 

Courses of Grade I are numbered 100-199 and are primarily for 
freshmen and sophomores; those of Grade II, 200-299, primarily for 
sophomores: those of Grade III, 300-399, primarily for juniors and 
seniors. Grade IV, 400-499, indicates courses open only to seniors or 
graduate students. Grade V, 500-599, graduate students only. For 
necessary adjustments in grading, see page 57. 



DEPARTMENT OF ART 

Professor Ivy; Associate Professor Peterson; Assistant 
Professors Thrush, Stewart; Instructors Skelton, 
Hamlett, McIlvain, Mrs. Skelton. 

ART STUDIOS — Studios suitably equipped for various types of art acti- 
vities are located in Mclver Building. Exhibits of paintings, 
prints, textiles, etc. are held in the gallery. Each year an exhi- 
bition of the work done by the students in the Department that 
year is held. From this exhibition the Department selects ex- 
amples of work which are retained as long as they are useful. 

All students who select Art as a major or a minor should enroll 
for Art 101, 103, 224, and 241. Majors should complete these 
courses during the freshman and sophomore years. Individual in- 
terests determine the more advanced work of the student. 



DESIGN 

lOlr. ART STRUCTURE. 

A basic course in the use of the elements and principles of or- 
ganization common to all art expression. Through many prob- 
lems in various media, creative ability as well as intelligent 
choice and judgment in the use of art will have opportunity for 
development. One lecture and six studio hours each semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.50. Mr. Ivy, Miss 
Peterson, Miss Thrush, Mrs. Stewart, Mr. Skelton, Miss Hamlett, 
Miss McIlvain, Mrs. Skelton. (I) 



Department of Art 75 

224. COLOR AND DESIGN. 

A continuation of art structure with emphasis on color. A study 
of color theories and the decorative and structural use of color 
in creative problems. One lecture and six studio hours, second 
semester. Prerequisite, Art 101. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Ivy. (II) 

322. COSTUME DESIGN AND ILLUSTRATION. 

The use of art elements in costume, the relationship of the ele- 
ments to the physical characteristics, personality, types of ma- 
terials and purpose of costumes for various occasions. One lecture 
and six studio hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Art 101, 22U, 
2hl. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Ham- 
lett. (Ill) 

323. INTERIOR DESIGN. 

The use of art elements in the structural problems of interior 
design. The relationship of furniture, rugs, walls, etc., to the 
architectural form and to the personalities and activities of the 
occupants of the building. Creative problems in designing in- 
teriors of different types and periods will be executed. One lec- 
ture and six studio hours, first semester. Prerequisites, Art 
101, 103, 22b. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $5.00. 
Miss Peterson. (Ill) 

327. COMMERCIAL DESIGN. 

Beginning course for students interested in advertising art. Study 
of design of lettering with opportunity for creative work de- 
signing page arrangements, cards, booklets, posters, etc. One lee- 
ture and six studio hours, second semester. Prerequisites, Art 
101, 103, 22 A. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. 
Miss Thrush. (Ill) 

331. INDUSTRIAL ARTS DESIGN. 

Problems in weaving, bookmaking, woodwork, and leather tool- 
ing are designed and executed with consideration of the relation- 
ship to industrial processes of production. One lecture and six 
studio hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Art 101. Credit, three 
semester hours. Studio fee, $3.00. Mrs. Stewart. (Ill) 

359. TEXTILE DESIGN. 

A study through creative problems of the processes of textile 
decoration, blockprint, tie and dye, batik, stencil, air brush, etc., 
considering the design and the process in its relation to com- 
mercial production as well as the art quality of the product. 
One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. Prerequisites, 
Art 101, 103, 22U- Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. 
Miss Mcllvain. (Ill) 

375. INDUSTRIAL DESIGN. 

A study of the application of the principles of design to articles 
to be produced by machine. The background necessary to the 
designer, criticism of past and present designs, consideration of 
market demands, old and new materials and manufacturing pro- 
cesses will be considered. One lecture and six studio hours, first 
semester. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 22 U, 241. Credit, three 
semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. (Ill) 






76 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

377. DESIGN FOR THE THEATRE. 

Problems, materials, and technique related to design for the 
theatre will be studied. Elevations and model sets for various 
types and period productions will be planned and executed. One 
lecture and six studio hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Art 
101. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Thrush. 
(HI) 

450r-469r. STUDIO PROBLEMS. COORDINATING COURSE. 

Advanced work in any phase of work offered by the Department. 
This is open to Art majors who have shown superior ability and 
upon the completion of eighteen semester hours of Art credit. 
May be taken only during the senior year and with the approval 
of the head of the Department and the instructor with whom 
the student will work. Three conference or lecture hours and a 
minimum of six hours of studio work. Credit, three or six semester 
hours. Studio fee, $2.00 to $5.00. Staff of Department of Art. 
(IV) 

DRAWING AND PAINTING 

241. DRAWING AND COMPOSITION. 

Fundamental principles of drawing and composition emphasized. 
Study of the laws of cylindrical, parallel and angular perspective 
both in the studio and out-of-doors using various media. One lec- 
ture and six studio hours, first semester. Credit, three semester, 
hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Thrush. (II) 

342. DRAWING AND PAINTING. 

A continuation of Art 241 with attention to problems in color. 
This course gives the student opportunity for experimental studies 
in the technique of water color and oil painting. One lecture and 
six studio hours, second semester. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 
22 A, 2Jfl. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Miss 
Thrush. (Ill) 

351. ADVANCED DRAWING AND COMPOSITION. 

A continuation of Drawing and Composition with emphasis on 
problems of form, space and volume as expressed in line and 
dark and light. One lecture and six studio hours, second semester. 
Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 241. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $2.00. Miss Hamlett. (Ill) 

360. ADVANCED PAINTING. 

Experimental problems in form, volume, space and light ex- 
pressed in color emphasizing still-life and landscape subjects are 
executed in both water color and oil. One lecture and six studio 
hours, second semester. Prerequisites, Art 101, 2U1> 3U2. Credit, 
three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. Mr. Ivy. (Ill) 

364. FIGURE DRAWING AND PAINTING. 

The first part of this course is devoted to figure construction in 
black and white while the latter half is devoted to problems in 
color. One lecture and six studio hours, first semester. Prerequi- 
sites, Art 101, 241, 3U2* Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, 
$2.00. Miss Hamlett. (Ill) 



Department of Art 77 

373. MECHANICAL DRAWING. 

A course designed to equip a student to produce and read working 
drawings and plans such as may be used in furniture factories 
and by interior designers. The course includes the theory of 
projection, the use of scales and the technique of projectioning. 
One lecture and six studio hours, first semester. Prerequisites, 
Art 1.01, 103, 241. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $2.00. 
Mr. Tiedeman. (Ill) 

s381. ADVANCED LANDSCAPE PAINTING. 

The aim of this course is to study the problems encountered in 
landscape painting. The handling of form, volume, space, light 
and color, and the organization of composition emphasizing the 
theories, methods and techniques of post-impressionism, cubism 
and other recent trends in painting will be studied. Students 
will work directly from different types of subject matter out-of- 
doors in painting compositions in both oil and water color. This 
course will be given at Beaufort, North Carolina, for one month 
during the summer. Seven lectures and thirty-four studio hours 
each week. Prerequisites, Art 101, 103, 224, 241, 31*2, or the 
equivalent. Permission to register for this course must be secured 
from the instructor. Credit, four semester hours. Mr. Ivy. (Ill) 

ART HISTORY 

103r. INTRODUCTION TO ART. 

A study of the nature and materials of art and the relation of 
art to physical and cultural environment. The chief purpose of 
this course is to establish a basis for intelligent appreciation. 
Three hours each semester. Credit, three semester hours. Studio 
fee, $1.00. Miss Peterson. (I) 

225. MODERN ART. 

The origin and development of the important art movements and 
the theories beginning with the ninetenth century and continu- 
ing through the present time. The work of the leaders in various 
movements will be studied. Emphasis is given to contemporary 
art. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Peterson. (II) 

257. HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE. 

A study of the architectural forms and the chief historic styles 
with emphasis on the relation of architecture to the civilization 
which produced it. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Peterson. (II) 

262. HISTORY OF PAINTING. 

The main developments in painting studied through the great 
creative periods from primitive times to the nineteenth century. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $1.00. Miss Peterson. (II) (Not given in 1940-41.) 

266. HISTORY OF FURNITURE. 

Period styles of furniture and interior design and the relation of 
these to the life of the time will be studied. Two hours, second 
semester. Credit, two semester hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Miss 
Peterson. (II) 



78 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

337. ART HISTORY AND APPRECIATION. 

A survey course to introduce the student to art contribution from 
pre-historic times to the present and to develop an appreciation 
of art quality as it has found expression in various ways during 
different ages. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Studio fee, $1.00. Students who have credit for Art 
103 are not eligible to take this course. Miss Peterson. (Ill) 

CERAMICS AND SCULPTURE 

239. MODELING. 

A general course in the preparation of clay, designing and model- 
ing simple bowls, animal and figure compositions in relief and 
in the round, the making of one-piece molds and casting in clay. 
One lecture and six studio hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Studio fee, $5.00. Mr. Skelton. (II) 

340. POTTERY. 

A study of the design and the processes of pottery making, primi- 
tive coil method, use of potter's wheel, two- and three-piece mold 
casting, preparation, application and fusing of glazes. One lec- 
ture and six studio hours, first semester. Prerequisites, Art 101, 
103, 239. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $5.00. Mr. 
Skelton. (Ill) 

344. SCULPTURE. 

A study of the sculptural and plastic problems encountered in 
various sculptural media — terra cotta, stone, wood — and the rela- 
tionship of sculpture to architecture and landscape architecture 
through creative problems for specific sites and purposes. One 
lecture and six studio hours, first semester. Prerequisites, Art 
101, 103, 239. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, $5.00. 
Mr. Skelton. (Ill) 



ART EDUCATION 

333r. ART EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 

A study of the aims of art in the elementary school, the curricula 
of typical public schools, selection, preparation and use of teach- 
of illustrative material and creative work to fit the needs of 
individual students. Two lecture and two studio hours, each 
semester. Prerequisite, Art 101. Credit, three semester hours. 
Studio fee, $2.00. Mrs. Stewart. (Ill) 

354. ART EDUCATION IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. 

A study of the aims of art in the secondary school, the curricula 
of typical public schools, selection, preparation and use of teach- 
ing materials. Observation and criticism of activities in both 
junior and senior high schools, combined with planning desir- 
able activities for public schools will be required. Two lecture 
and two studio hours, second semester. Prerequisites, eighteen 
semester hours of Art. Credit, three semester hours. Studio fee, 
$2.00. Mr. Skelton. (Ill) 



Department of Biology 79 



ASTRONOMY 



210. INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY. 

An outline of the basic facts in astronomy and its history, with 
constellation study. This course is designed for those interested 
in the cultural side of science and for prospective teachers of 
General Science and of Geography. It has no prerequisite in 
college mathematics and cannot be used to fulfill the science re- 
quirement for graduation. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Strong. (II) 

For other courses in Astronomy, see Department of Mathematics. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Professors Givler, Hall ; Associate Professors Coldwell, 
Shaftesbury, Ingraham, Williams, Love, Thiel; 
Instructors Ritchie, Gangstad, Arundel; Assistants 
Brummitt, Heffner, Anderson. 

BIOLOGY LABORATORIES— Those at present in use on the third floor 
of the Mclver Building include a large double laboratory for 
General Biology and two each for Botany, Zoology, Physiology 
and Bacteriology. Equipment, adequate for the work of the sev- 
eral courses, includes nearly 200 compound microscopes, many 
equipped for advanced students, microtomes, sterilizers, elec- 
trical refrigerators, centrifuge, paraffin baths, basal metabolism 
apparatus, projection lanterns and an incubator room. Museum 
collections, demonstration material and models are used in the 
conduct of the various courses. The college owns and operates 
a marine laboratory at Beaufort, N. C. Its facilities are avail- 
able during the summer to students and faculty members. In the 
new fireproof Science Building on College Avenue thoroughly 
modern quarters for biology are being provided on the second 
and part of the first floor. Facilities here include ten specially 
designed laboratories, a museum, five preparation rooms and 
other quarters for specialized functions. Modern furniture as 
well as electrical and mechanical facilities are being installed 
to complete the equipment. 

BIOLOGY 

101 and 102. GENERAL BIOLOGY.* 

A study of selected types of plants and animals designed to ac- 
quaint the student with the structure, activities and life rela- 
tions of organisms. Biological principles are stressed. Two 
lecture hours and three laboratory hours, for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 a semester. Miss Cold- 
well, Mr. Givler, Mr. Shaftesbury, Miss Ingraham, Mr. Thiel, Mr. 
Ritchie, Miss Gangstad, Miss Brummit, Miss Anderson. (I) 



* Specially qualified students may enter General Botany, 221 or 222, or General 
Zoology, 241 and 242, upon presentation of their high school General Biology note 
book, if accepted after an interview with the head of the Biology Department. 



80 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

492. HEREDITY AND EUGENICS. 

This course deals with the history and meaning of the doctrine 
of organic evolution, the theories and mechanism of heredity, 
and their relation to the problem of human betterment. Lec- 
tures, reading of text and reference books with written reports. 
Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, nine hours of Bio- 
logical Science. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Givler. (IV) 

449. COORDINATING COURSE. THE HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES 
OF BIOLOGY. 

Origins of biology with outlines of main trends into special 
fields. Principles presented and reviewed. Lectures and seminar 
discussions. Books and papers reviewed by students. Recom- 
mended for all Seniors preparing for the comprehensive exam- 
ination in biology. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Givler. (IV) 

499r. BIOLOGICAL PROBLEMS. 

Individual studies in Botany, Zoology, or other fields. The lab- 
oratory work and reading of the student will be guided by a 
weekly conference with the instructor in charge. A written report 
will be submitted each semester. Laboratory work and confer- 
ences are arranged. Credit, three or more semester hours. Labo- 
ratory fee, $1.00 per credit hour. (IV) 



BOTANY 

221. GENERAL BOTANY. 

A survey of the life of seed plants with special emphasis on the 
relations between structure and function. Two lecture hours and 
three laboratory hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Biology 101 
and 102. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Mr. Hall, Mr. Thiel. (II) 

222. GENERAL BOTANY. 

A study of the structure, life history, reproduction, and relation- 
ships of selected types from the Thallophytes to the Spermato- 
phytes. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, second 
semester. Prerequisite, Biology 101 and 102. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Hall, Mr. Thiel. (II) 

324. LOCAL FLORA. 

Methods and principles of plant classification. The identification 
of flowering plants. Field trips. Two lecture hours and three 
laboratory hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Biology 221 
or 222. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. 
Hall. (Ill) 

325r. HISTOLOGY AND ANATOMY. 

The technique of preparing plant material for anatomical studies ; 
methods of killing, imbedding, sectioning and staining. The 
tissues are studied as to origin, differentiation, and organization. 
Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours. Prerequisite, 
Biology 221. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Mr. Thiel. (Ill) 



Department of Biology 81 

326. PLANT MORPHOLOGY. 

Comparative morphology of Algas, Fungi, and Mosses. One lec- 
ture hour and six laboratory hours, second semester. Prerequisite, 
Biology 221 or 222. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. Mr. Thiel. (Given upon request.) (Ill) 

327. PLANT ECOLOGY. 

An elementary study of plants in their natural habitats and in 
relation to the factors of environment such as soil, water, heat, 
light, and animals. Major emphasis will be placed upon the laws 
of plant distribution and the factors involved in plant associa- 
tions. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, first semes- 
ter. Prerequisites, Biology 221 or 222. Credit, three semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Hall. (Ill) 

328. PLANT MORPHOLOGY. 

Comparative morphology of Ferns, Gymnosperms and Angio- 
sperms. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours, second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, Biology 221 or $22. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Thiel. (Given upon request.) (Ill) 

330. DISEASES OF PLANTS. 

A study of the diseases of plants, their causal organisms, dis- 
tribution, and methods of prevention and control. Two lecture 
hours and three laboratory hours, second semester. Prerequisite, 
Biology 221 or 222. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. Mr. Thiel. (Ill) 

ZOOLOGY 

241 and 242. GENERAL ZOOLOGY. 

A study of the structure, physiology, habits, ecology, distribution 
and economic importance of animals, and of the general prin- 
ciples of animal biology, with dissection of types of the principal 
groups. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, for the 
year. Prerequisites, Biology 101 and 102, or equivalent. Credit, 
six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 a semester. Mr. 
Shaftesbury. (II) 

247. ECONOMIC ORNITHOLOGY. 

Laboratory work and lectures on the classification, distribution, 
food relations, and conservation of birds. First semester. Pre- 
requisites, Biology 101 and 102, or equivalent, and approval of 
the instructor. Credit, one semester hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 
Mr. Shaftesbury. (II) 

248. GENERAL ORNITHOLOGY. 

Chiefly field work on the identification and seasonal distribution 
of our native birds. Each student must be provided with opera 
glass or low-power field glass. Second semester. Prerequisites, 
Biology 101 and 102, or equivalent. Credit, one semester hour. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. (II) 

345. ANIMAL ECOLOGY. 

A study of the relations of animals to the conditions in which 
they live, with special emphasis upon adaptations and conserva- 
tion. The field work includes a general survey of the ponds and 



82 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

streams of the Greensboro region. Two lecture hours and three 
laboratory hours, first semester. Prerequisites, Biology 101 and 
102, and three additional semester hours in Biological Sciences. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Shaftes- 
bury. (Ill) 

351. COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF VERTEBRATES. 

A study of the comparative anatomy and evolution of the ver- 
tebrates, with dissection of a series of types. Two lecture hours 
and six laboratory hours, first semester. Prerequisites, Biology 
101 and 102. Credit, four semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 
Mr. Shaftesbury. (Ill) 

s353. INVERTEBRATE MARINE ZOOLOGY. 

Offered for six weeks during the summer under the natural con- 
ditions of environment at the Carolina Marine Laboratory of 
Woman's College, at Beaufort, N. C. For advanced college stu- 
dents, high school teachers, and others interested in professional 
biology. Includes lectures, laboratory and field study and assigned 
readings. Chiefly on marine invertebrates, together with an 
introduction to the study of the vertebrates. Prerequisites, at 
least two years of college biology, or extended teaching experience 
in biology. Credit, six semester hours. As the enrollment is lim- 
ited, application should be made before April 1, to A. D. Shaftes- 
bury, Acting Director, Carolina Marine Laboratory, Woman's 
College of the University of North Carolina, Greensboro, N. C. 
(HI) 

354. VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY. 

A comparative study of embryos of frog, chick, and mammal. 
The work includes observation of living material, practical tech- 
nique, the study of serial sections, and dissection of the larger 
embryos and foetal membranes. Two lecture hours and six lab- 
oratory hours, second semester. Prerequisites, nine hours in 
Biological Sciences. Credit, four semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. (Ill) 

356. PARASITOLOGY. 

An introductory study of the biology, life histories, distribution, 
and control of animal parasites, with special reference to those 
producing diseases of man and domestic animals. Two lecture 
hours and three laboratory hours, second semester. Prerequisites, 
Biology 2U1 and 2U2, or Biology 281. Credit, three semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. (Ill) 



PHYSIOLOGY 

277r. PHYSIOLOGY OF THE HUMAN BODY. 

A brief consideration of the structure and functions of each sys- 
tem of the human body. Two lecture hours and three laboratory 
hours. Prerequisites, Biology 101 and 102. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Williams, Miss Heffner. 
(ID 

271. MAMMALIAN ANATOMY. 

Human anatomy is studied by means of skeletons, anatomical 
preparations, models, a manikin, and demonstration of human 






Department of Biology 83 

dissections. The cat and other mammals are dissected. Two lec- 
ture hours and three laboratory hours, first semester. Pre- 
requisites, Biology 101 and 102. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Miss Williams, Miss Heffner. (II) 

372. HISTOLOGY AND ORGANOLOGY. 

A study of the microscopic structure of the principal tissues and 
organs of the animal body, with practical work in histological 
technique. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours, second 
semester. Prerequisite, Biology 271 or equivalent. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Williams. (Ill) 

373. PHYSIOLOGY OP THE NEUROMUSCULAR SYSTEM, RES- 

PIRATION AND CIRCULATION. 

A detailed study of muscle, nerve, blood, circulation, and respi- 
ration. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, first semes- 
ter. Prerequisites, Biology 271 or 277, and Chemistry 101 and 102, 
or 103 and 10 U- Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$2.00. Miss Williams. (Ill) 

374. PHYSIOLOGY OF DIGESTION, METABOLISM, EXCRETION 

AND REPRODUCTION. 

The course includes a study of the chemistry and physiological 
processes of digestion, secretion, respiratory exchange, and ex- 
cretion. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, second 
semester. Prerequisite, Biology 373 or equivalent. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Williams. (Ill) 

378. PHYSIOLOGY OF ACTIVITY. 

A study of mechanisms involved in adjustments of the body to 
physical activity. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours, 
second semester. Prerequisites, Chemistry 101 and 102, or 103 
and 10 U, and Biology 271 and 277. Credit three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Williams. (Ill) 

BACTERIOLOGY 

281r. GENERAL BACTERIOLOGY. 

A general survey of the fundamental facts of bacteriology. Lab- 
oratory technique is emphasized. One lecture hour and six lab- 
oratory hours. Prerequisites, Biology 101 and 102, Chemistry 
101 and 102, or 103 and 10 U, prerequisite or parallel. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Love. (II) 

382. PATHOGENIC BACTERIOLOGY. 

The relation of bacteria to disease in man. Clinical and diagnostic 
methods; the characteristics, isolation and identification of path- 
ogenic micro-organisms. One lecture hour and six laboratory 
hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Biology 281. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Love, Miss Heffner. 

383. LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS. 

Examination of blood, spinal fluid, and other body fluids. De- 
signed for medical laboratory technicians. One lecture hour and 
six laboratory hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Biology 382. 
Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Love, Miss Heffner. (Ill) 



84 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

384. IMMUNOLOGY. 

Animals are inoculated with certain antigens and serological 
reactions demonstrated. Designed for medical laboratory tech- 
nicians. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours, second semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, Biology 383. Laboratory fee, $^.00. Miss Love, 
Miss Heffner. (Ill) 

ELEMENTARY SCIENCE 

233r. NATURE STUDY. 

A general course intended to aid teachers in interesting pupils 
of both elementary and secondary schools in the common objects 
of nature. A number of the laboratory periods will be used for 
field study. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours. Re- 
quired of candidates for all primary certificates. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Hall. (II) 

GEOGRAPHY 

235r. GENERAL GEOGRAPHY. 

A study of the fundamental distribution patterns of the world. 
Natural features, especially climates, landforms, vegetation, and 
soils are studied with a view toward broadening the background 
for the various fields of college work. Two lecture hours and 
three laboratory hours. Required of all candidates for -primary, 
grammar grade, and high school certificates to teach General 
Science. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00.. 
Miss Arundel. (II) 

236. ELEMENTS OF REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY. 

Description and analysis of the major regions of the world with 
particular emphasis upon human settlement and the use of the 
lands. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Geography 
235. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Arundel. (II) 

237r. INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY. 

The geography of economic production. Included for study are 
important raw commodities, as food, textile fibers, timber, and 
minerals; the distribution of selected examples of the major 
types of manufacturing industries; and the relation between re- 
sources, manufacturing, trade, trade routes, and national policies 
and development. Students desiring both Geography 235 and 
237 should take course 235 first if possible. Three hours. Re- 
quired of sophomores pursuing the course in Secretarial Admin- 
istration. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Arundel. (II) 



Department of Chemistry 85 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Professors Schaeffer, Petty; Associate Professor Bar- 
row; Assistant Professor Smith; Instructors Wil- 
kins, Olson ; Assistants Parker, Roberg. 

101r and 102. GENERAL CHEMISTRY. 

A general course designed to give the student who has had no 
previous preparation in the science, a view of the various fields 
of chemistry, an understanding of its more important theories 
and practice in applying them, together with an appreciation of 
its relationship to other sciences and its applications in industry, 
commerce, the household, etc. Two lecture hours and one three 
hour laboratory for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00 each semester. Miss Schaeffer, Miss Petty, Miss 
Smith, Miss Wilkins, Miss Olson, Miss Parker, Miss Roberg. (I) 

103 and 104. GENERAL CHEMISTRY. 

A general course designed for those students who have had high 
school chemistry. Two lecture hours and one three hour labora- 
tory for the year. Offered to students who present one unit in 
Chemistry for entrance. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00 each semester. Miss Schaeffer, Miss Roberg. (I) 

221. QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. 

The lectures in this course deal with the theories underlying the 
methods of inorganic qualitative analysis. The laboratory work 
includes the semi-micro methods for the separation and identifica- 
tion of the metallic radicals and of the more important non- 
metallic radicals. One lecture hour and two three hour labora- 
tories, first semester. Prerequisite, Chemistry 101 and 102 or 
103 and 10 %. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. 
Miss Wilkins. (II) 

223. BRIEF COURSE IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

An introduction to Organic Chemistry, including the carbo- 
hydrates. Two lecture hours and one three hour laboratory, first 
semester. Prerequisite, Chemistry 101 and 102 or 103 and 104. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Bar- 
row, Miss Smith. (II) 

231 and 332. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

This includes the study of the aliphatic hydrocarbons, their de- 
rivatives, fats, carbohydrates, proteins, and the aromatic series 
of organic compounds. One lecture hour and two three hour 
laboratories for the year. Prerequisite, Chemistry 101 and 102 or 
103 and 104. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00 
each semester. Miss Schaeffer, Miss Parker. 
(Chemistry 231 is Grade II; Chemistry 332 is Grade III.) 

322. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. 

An introduction to quantitative analysis including a study of 
the principles and methods of gravimetric and volumetric analy- 
sis. In the laboratory work the main emphasis is placed upon 
volumetric methods. One lecture hour and two three hour lab- 
oratories, second semester. Prerequisite, Chemistry 221. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Wilkins. (Ill) 



86 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

324. BRIEF COURSE IN FOOD AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEM- 
ISTRY. 
The chemistry of lipins, proteins, digestion, metabolism, and ex- 
cretion, with some work in urine and blood analysis. Two lecture 
hours and one three hour laboratory, second semester. Prere- 
quisite, Chemistry 223. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $4.00. Miss Barrow, Miss Smith. (Ill) 

333 and 334. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

The Aromatic Series, with special organic preparations relating 
to drugs, dyes, and biological processes. One lecture hour and 
two three hour laboratories for the year. Prerequisite, Chemistry 
231-332. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4-00 each 
semester. Miss Schaeffer. (Ill) 

335 and 336. BIOCHEMISTRY. 

The chemistry of the carbohydrates, lipins, proteins, with studies 
in digestion, urine and blood analysis, and organic tissues. One 
lecture hour and two three hour laboratories. Prerequisite, Chem<- 
istry 231-332. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00 
each semester. Miss Barrow. (Ill) 

323. ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. 

A continuation of Chemistry 322. In the laboratory work the 
emphasis is placed upon gravimetric methods of analysis. One 
lecture hour and two three hour laboratories, first semester. Pre- 
requisite, Chemistry 322. Credit, three semester hours. Labora- 
tory fee, $4.00. Miss Wilkins. (Ill) 

343. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. 

An introduction to the principles and problems of physical chem- 
istry. In the laboratory the student is given practice in making 
some typical physicochemical measurements. One lecture hour 
and two three hour laboratories, first semester. Prerequisites, 
Chemistry 221 and 322 or 231 and 332; Mathematics 101 and 102 
or 103 and 104; Physics 101 and 102 or 205 and 206. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4-00. Miss Schaeffer, Miss Ol- 
son. (Ill) 

344. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. 

A continuation of Chemistry 343. One lecture hour and two three 
hour laboratories, second semester. Prerequisite, Chemistry 343. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4*00. Miss Schaef- 
fer, Miss Olson. (Ill) 

450. COORDINATING COURSE (History of Chemistry). 

The purpose of this course is to coordinate the previous course 
work of the student in the field of Chemistry and to serve as a 
general survey of the field, approaching the subject from an 
historical point of view. Required of all students majoring in 
Chemistry. Credit, three semester hours; second semester. Hours 
to be arranged. Miss Schaeffer and staff. 



Department of Classical Civilization 87 

DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 

Associate Professor Jernigan; Associate Professor 
Denneen. 

lllr. MYTHOLOGY. 

This course is designed mainly for freshmen, and no knowledge 
of Greek or Latin is required. The great myths of the world are 
studied with frequent references to the literature which they 
inspired. The Greek, Roman, and Norse mythologies are stressed. 
Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Jernigan. (I). 

*335. GREEK AND LATIN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. 

No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Introductory lec- 
tures are given on the art of epic poetry and the influence of 
the Greek and Roman epic upon subsequent literature. Homer 
and Vergil are read and studied in translation. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (III). 

*336. GREEK AND LATIN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. 

This course is devoted mainly to the study of Greek tragedy 
through the medium of translations, though some attention is 
paid to other types of Greek and Roman literature. This is ac- 
companied by lectures on Greek literary and religious concep- 
tions, on the ideals which made Greek culture preeminent in the 
history of thought, and on the influence of Greek literature upon 
subsequent thought. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

**397. ENGLISH LITERATURE AND THE CLASSICS. 

(This course is equivalent to English 397.) 

A study of English Literature against the background of the 
Classics. Literature is read according to type; for example, the 
epic is studied in both ancient and modern authors, then lyric 
poetry, the drama, the pastoral. Emphasis is laid on the quality 
of English Literature as determined by the influence of the 
Classics. Readings in fifteen or twenty authors. The ancient 
writers will be read in the best English versions. English credit 
is given for this course. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is 
required. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

**398. ENGLISH LITERATURE AND THE CLASSICS. 
(This course is equivalent to English 398.) 

A continuation of Course 397. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 



* Either 335 or 336 may be taken for credit without the other. 
** Either 397 or 398 may be taken for credit without the other. 



88 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

201 and 202. GREEK FOR BEGINNERS. 

Emphasis is placed on the fundamental principles of Greek gram- 
mar, and special attention is given to the correlation of Greek 
grammar with the grammar of modern languages, particularly- 
English. This course is open to freshmen and is recommended 
for students of language, religion, or medicine. Three hours for 
the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (II) 

303 and 304. XENOPHON'S ANABASIS; HOMER'S ILIAD. 

The purpose of this course is to develop fluency in the reading of 
Greek and to introduce the student to a part of the great litera- 
ture of the past. Selections from the New Testament. Three 
hours for the year. Prerequisites, Greek 201 and 202, or two en- 
trance units. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

325 and 326. GREEK TRAGEDY. 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Jerni- 
gan. (Ill) 

401 and 402. PLATO, SELECTED WORKS. (Apology, Crito, etc.) 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Jerni- 
gan. (IV) 

LATIN 

101 and 102. LATIN FOR BEGINNERS. 

Fundamentals of grammar and the reading of stories from 
Caesar and Ovid. This course is designed not only to teach Latin 
grammar and style, but also to make constant comparisons be- 
tween Latin and English grammar and to teach purity of dic- 
tion. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. 
Jernigan. (I) 

103 and 104. ROMAN ORATORY. 

Cicero's Orations and readings from Ovid's Metamorphoses, to- 
gether with prose compositions. Three hours for the year. Pre- 
requisite, Latin 101 and 102, or two entrance units. Credit, six 
semester hours. Miss Denneen. (I) 

105 and 106. VERGIL'S AENEID I-VI. 

With lectures on pertinent topics. Three hours for the year. 
Prerequisite, Latin 103 and 10 %, or three entrance units. Credit, 
six semester hours. Miss Denneen. (I) 

207. THE SOCIAL LIFE OF ROME. 

Selected readings from Nepos, the letters of Cicero and Pliny 
the Younger. Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, four 
entrance units or three entrance units by consent of the instruc- 
tor. Credit, three seemster hours. Mr. Jernigan. (II) 

208. HORACE. 

Selections from the Odes and Epodes. Three hours, second se- 
mester. Prerequisite, Latin 105 and 106, or four entrance units. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (II) 



Department of Classical Civilization 89 

209. LATIN PROSE AND POETRY: SELECTIONS. 

Sallust, Ovid, Suetonius, Gellius. Three hours, first semester. 
Prerequisite, four entrance units or three entrance units by con- 
sent of the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jerni- 
gan. (II) 

210. LATIN PROSE AND POETRY: SELECTIONS. 

Cicero, De Senectute, Be Amicitia; Catullus, Shorter Poems. A 
continuation of Latin 209. Three hours, second semester. Pre- 
requisite, Latin 105 and 106, or four entrance units. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. 

Courses for Juniors and Seniors. 

Not all of courses 321-331 will be offered in any one year; a 
selection will be made meeting as far as possible the needs and 
desires of students majoring in Latin. Courses in other phases 
of the literature will be offered as needed. 

321. ROMAN COMEDY. 

Plautus. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

322. ROMAN COMEDY. 

Terence. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Jernigan. 

323. ELEGIAC PQETRY. 

Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid. A study of Latin Ele- 
giac poetry; its source, types, and influence. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

324. HISTORY AND POLITICS IN THE TIMES OF JULIUS 

CAESAR. 
A study of the period 63-64 B.C. Readings from Sallust's Cati- 
line, Suetonius's Life of Julius Caesar, Caesar's Gallic War, and 
Civil War and Cicero's Orations and Letters. Three hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

325. ROME AND CARTHAGE. 

Readings from Livy, Brooks XXXI-XLV, and Tacitus. Develop- 
ment of Rome as a world power from the first Punic War until 
the subjugation of Macedon. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

326. OVID. 

Reading and interpretation of selections from the Heroides, 
Amores, Tristia, Epistulae ex Ponto, and the Metamorphoses. 
The influence upon subsequent literature. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

331. ADVANCED PROSE COMPOSITION. 

Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Jernigan. (Ill) 

*333. VERGIL. 

Readings in the Eclogues, Georgics, and Aeneid. A study of the 
art of Vergil in its development. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

* Either 333 or 334 may be taken for credit without the other. 



90 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

*334. VERGIL. 

A continuation of Course 333. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jernigan. (Ill) 

335. ROMAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. 
See Classical Civilization 335. (Ill) 

450. COORDINATING COURSE FOR MAJORS. 

Extensive readings in the literature of the Classics will be se- 
lected in accord with student needs. Periodic conferences, writ- 
ten reports, and quizzes will be given throughout the term. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jerni- 
gan. (IV) 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

Professors Keister, Teague; Assistant Professor BUNT- 
ING; Instructors Bonner, Harman. 

211. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 

A study of the present-day economic system. Such topics as the 
following are considered: specialization; the effects of machin- 
ery; large-scale production; functions of middlemen and mar- 
kets; speculation; demand, supply, and prices; money, credit, 
and banking. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Keister, Mr. Bunting. (II) 

212. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 

Business cycles and depressions; international trade, foreign 
exchange, and protective tariffs; monopolies and their regula- 
tion; the distribution of wealth in modern society; consumption; 
proposals to change the economic order. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister, Mr. Bunt- 
ing. (II) 

233 and 234. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING. 

How the accounts of a business are kept and how reports are 
compiled from these accounts. To give the student a mastery 
of the fundamentals of accounting, exercises and problems will 
be required. Business forms, documents, and practices will be 
analyzed to give a familiarity with modern business procedure. 
Three hours, throughout the year. Credit, six semester hours, 
Mr. Bonner, Mr. Harman. (II) 

323. TAXATION AND GOVERNMENT FINANCE. 

The chief governmental expenditures and the main sources of 
revenue used by governments. Property taxes, income and in- 
heritance taxes, license and franchise taxes, and various forms 
of sales taxes will be discussed. A comparison of the tax burden 
on different classes in society. Improvements needed in the tax 
structure. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Bunting. (Ill) 



* Either 333 or 334 may be taken for credit without the other. 



Department of Economics 91 

324. LABOR PROBLEMS. 

A study of the basis for the conflict between workers and em- 
ployers, and some of the more important results of this conflict 
of interest, such as labor organizations, collective bargaining, 
labor legislation, and the agitation for change in the present 
capitalistic system. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Keister. (Ill) 

325r. GENERAL ECONOMICS— BRIEFER COURSE. 

A survey of our economic organization, emphasizing specializa- 
tion, markets, middlemen, money, banking, profits, and wages. 
Three hours, each semester. Required of juniors in the school of 
Home Economics. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister. (Ill) 

327. MONEY AND BANKING. 

How our different varieties of money and credit instruments are 
issued and secured; the functions performed by money in our 
society; how the funds necessary to carry on modern business 
are assembled and shifted to those who can use them most pro- 
fitably; the services of bond houses, stock exchanges, commercial 
banks, and the Federal Reserve System. Three hours, first se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Bunting. (Ill) 
(Not given in 1940-1941.) 

328. THE MANAGEMENT OF PERSONAL FINANCES. 

Budgeting and keeping account of one's personal funds; deposit- 
ing and borrowing money; saving and investing. The chief 
investments, with the advantages and disadvantages of each; 
savings accounts at interest, shares in building and loan asso- 
ciations, life insurance, purchase of real estate, bonds and mort- 
gages, and corporation stocks. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister. (Ill) 

329r. BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND PRACTISE. 

Some business principles helpful to young women, especially to 
those considering a business career. The departments and their 
functions within a business firm, such as production, buying, sell- 
ing, advertising, financing and accounting. Analysis and inter- 
pretation of financial statements and business data. Two hours, 
each semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Bonner. (Ill) 

330r. PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING. 

A general survey of the field of marketing, with a detailed study 
of the functions, policies, and institutions involved in the mar- 
keting of raw materials, manufactured goods, and agricultural 
products. The marketing problems of the farmer, of the manu- 
facturer, of various middlemen, and of different types of retail- 
ers will be studied. Two hours, either semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Mr. Keister. (Ill) 

336. THE ECONOMICS OF CONSUMPTION. 

An analysis of the economic order from the viewpoint of the 
consumer. How the American people distribute their spending. 
The factors, both helpful and harmful, influencing consumer 
demand. Building up the defenses of the consumer against the 
pressure of the producer and the advertiser. The various move- 
ments to aid the consumer, including more effective legislation, 



<)2 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

research, testing of products, and consumers' cooperation. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Keister. (Ill) 

338. INSTITUTION ACCOUNTING. 

This course will deal with fundamental principles and techniques 
of accounting applied to the business procedures and methods of 
a tea room, a school cafeteria, the nutrition department of a 
hospital, a college residence hall, a city club, and similar organ- 
izations. Two laboratory hours and one recitation, second semes- 
ter. Required of juniors in the Institution Economics curriculum 
in the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Home Economics. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Bonner. (Ill) 

431 and 432. BUSINESS LAW. 

The aim of this course will be to familiarize the student with 
the general principles of business law, including such subjects 
as contracts, agency, sales, negotiable instruments, partnerships, 
corporations, and bankruptcy. Three hours, throughout the year. 
For seniors. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Teague. (Ill) 

450. CO-ORDINATING COURSE. 

To prepare students majoring in Economics for the comprehen- 
sive examination. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Members of the staff. (Ill) 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Professors Cook, Fitzgerald, Clutts, Anselm; Asso- 
ciate Professors Kimmel, Denneen, Smith, MacFad- 
yen; Assistant Professors Kreimeier, Land, Reger, 
Fitzgerald, Mehaffie, Krug, Gunter, Shaver; In- 
structors Flintom, Hunter, Allen, Ogden, and Shel- 
burne. 

opportunity for observation and teaching under su- 
PERVISION — The Curry School, located on the campus, is main- 
tained as an integral part of the College under the direction of 
the Department of Education. The Curry School includes all 
phases of public school work from the kindergarten through 
high school, and more than 400 pupils are enrolled in it from a 
representative district of the City of Greensboro. The school 
offers in its program music, physical education, home economics, 
commercial education, and elementary art. The high school is 
a member of the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. 

Among the advantages of the Curry School is a library contain- 
ing over 4,200 books, 5,000 pictures, numerous pamphlets, clip- 
pings and material aids for units of study in many fields. In 
addition the library also serves as a laboratory in which pupils, 
student-teachers, and supervisors may become acquainted with 
books and readings for boys and girls as well as with the func- 
tions and uses of the library in the public schools. Classroom 
teachers also have opportunity to become acquainted with the 
possibilities of the library as a means of public education. 



Department of Education 93 

GENERAL COURSES 

313. THE AMERICAN PUBLIC SCHOOL. 

The purpose of the course is to give a general understanding of 
American educational conditions. A study of the origin and 
traditions of our educational institutions, their social purposes 
and the effect of these influences on theories and practices is 
made. The course is designed for prospective teachers as well 
as liberal arts students who wish to understand educational 
problems from the civic point of view. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Miss MacFadyen. (Ill) 

315. SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND CLASSROOM MANAGE- 
MENT. 
This course includes: types of school organization, school disci- 
pline, punishment, problems of school grading and marking, 
preparation of teachers, agencies for teachers' growth in service, 
records and reports, the daily program, attendance and health 
of school children, community relations and duties, school ethics, 
and character training. Observation of teaching in grades and 
high school to study problems of school management. Required 
course for elementary teachers. Elective for high school teachers. 
Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Fitzgerald, Mr. Cook. (Ill) 

370. SOCIAL INTERPRETATIONS OF EDUCATION. 

A study of education as a socializing force and of various social 
agencies as educative factors; and of the school in its relation 
to the community, the state, the church, and other institutions, 
and to the changing social ideals and policies. Two hours, second 
semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Cook. (Ill) 

371. THE TEACHING OF HIGHWAY SAFETY. 

(1) An analytical study of the causes of highway accidents and 
means of prevention; functions of legal controls; ways of build- 
ing right habits and attitudes. (2) Teaching fundamental rules 
of traffic and essential knowledge of the automobile mechanism. 
Enrollment limited; consult instructor before registration. Credit, 
one semester hour. Mr. Anselm. (Ill) 

449r. CO-ORDINATING COURSE— PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION. 

A study of the physical, biological, psychological, and social 
bases of education with an interpretation of the principles that 
underlie and affect the curriculum, methods, educational aims, 
types of school organization, modern educational problems and 
theories, moral and vocational education, and the school as a 
social agency. Required of majors in Primary and Grammar 
Grade Education. Three hours, either semester. For seniors. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Cook. (Ill) 

481r. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION. 

A study of the physical, biological, psychological, and social bases 
of education with an interpretation of the principles that under- 
lie and affect the curriculum, methods, educational aims, types 
of school organization, modern educational problems and the- 
ories, moral and vocational education, and the school as a social 
agency. Three hours, either semester. For Seniors. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Cook. (Ill) 



94 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

483r. MORAL EDUCATION. 

A practical course for teachers and others interested in moral 
problems. The following problems will be studied and investi- 
gated: origin of morals; theories of morals; cause of and pro- 
posed remedies for juvenile delinquency and crime; influential 
agencies affecting character, such as churches, schools, radios, 
movies, current literature, the youth movement; growth of city 
population and changing ideals of right and wrong. The aim 
of this course will be the formulation of constructive suggestions 
by which good citizenship and character may be developed by co- 
operation of the public schools with other agencies. Three hours, 
either semester. Prerequisite, approval of the instructor. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Cook. (Ill) 

489. HISTORY OF EDUCATION. 

This course is designed to give an historical background for the 
study and interpretation of present educational problems. Edu- 
cational development of Western Europe and interpretation in 
the light of social and political conditions. Attention will be given 
to a study of the life and theories of the educational leaders of 
different periods. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, ap- 
proval of the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Clutts. (Ill) 

SECONDARY 

350r. TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING IN THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

In this course the principles fundamental to good high school 
teaching are studied in class and observed in the Curry High 
School. The best practices long used by superior teachers are 
integrated with the best theory and practices of recent develop- 
ments. A background of the American high school is laid and the 
different present day procedures are critically studied. Special 
attention is given to high school objectives, motivation and the 
meeting of individual differences. In the light of present day 
society and modern Educational Psychology, the prospective 
teacher is encouraged to develop his own procedure in teaching. 
Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Clutts. (Ill) 

351r. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH. 
This course is intended for teachers of English in the secondary 
school. The first part of the course deals with methods of in- 
struction in the language-composition branch of English; the 
second part deals with the reading-literature branch of the cur- 
riculum. Emphasis is placed upon the study and practice of the 
methods of teaching composition, grammar, and literature — the 
choice, the interpretation, the arrangement, and the presentation 
of materials. Recent scientific tests and measurements and the 
minimum-essentials program are also stressed. Systematic ob- 
servation and demonstration work in the high school are in- 
cluded. Prerequisite, content and professional courses to meet 
the approval of the, instructor. Credit, three semester hours, 
either semester. Miss Kreimeier. (Ill) 



Department of Education 95 

352r. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL FRENCH. 
This course aims to give practical help in the problems that arise 
in the teaching of French. Among the topics considered will be 
the following: the general aims and methods of teaching a 
modern language; the organization of a course of study in 
French; the basis for judging textbooks, reference books for the 
teacher; recent scientific tests in French; the work of the Mod- 
ern Foreign Language Study. Systematic observation of the 
teaching of French in the high school. Three hours, either se- 
mester. Prerequisite, content and professional courses to meet 
the approval of the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Shaver. (Ill) 

353r. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL SOCIAL 
STUDIES. 
A study of the organization of history and social science courses 
in junior and senior high school. Such topics as choice of texts, 
reference works, equipment, and supplementary material will be 
considered. Observation of the teaching of these subjects in the 
high school. Three hours, either semester. Education 350, pre- 
requisite, or to be taken jointly for professional credit. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Allen. (Ill) 

355r. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL LATIN. 

Discussion of aims and general methods of teaching Latin; 
methods of teaching specific points — vocabulary, derivatives, 
forms syntax and translation — with emphasis on the work of 
the first year; devices for arousing interest; text books and 
supplementary books; standard tests in Latin; recommendations 
from the report of the Classical Investigation. Observation of 
the teaching of Latin in the high school. Three hours, either 
semester. Prerequisite, content and professional courses to meet 
the approval of the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Denneen. (Ill) 

357r. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL MATHE- 
MATICS. 
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the 
problems involved in the selection, organization, and presenta- 
tion of the materials in high school mathematics. Emphasis 
will be placed upon the parts played by social and psychological 
factors which enter into these problems. Observation of the 
teaching of mathematics in the high school. Three hours, either 
semester. Prerequisite, content and professional courses to meet 
the approval of the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Kimmel. 

359r. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE. 
The organization of the course in general science, sources of 
material, the texts, laboratory equipment, and other problems 
of the science teacher will be discussed. The course includes 
systematic observation of the teaching of science in the high 
school. Three hours, either semester. Prerequisite, content and 
professional courses to meet the approval of the instructor. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Smith. (Ill) 



96 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

360. PROBLEMS OF SECONDARY EDUCATION. 

This course is planned for seniors who have already made a 
study of the Technique of Teaching. The purpose is to examine 
some of the more fundamental administrative problems which 
condition the effectiveness of the classroom teacher. Among the 
topics discussed are: The scope and function of the high school 
and its relation to the elementary school and the college; the 
junior high school; vocational information; the high school cur- 
riculum; control of pupils; and extracurricular activities. A 
syllabus and assigned readings are used as the basis for the 
work. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, approval of 
the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Clutts. (Ill) 

ELEMENTARY 

320. TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING FOR PROSPECTIVE PRIMARY 
TEACHERS. 
This course includes a study of the school as an ideal environ- 
ment for the development and growth of the primary child and 
the field work of the teacher in the primary school. Teaching 
is considered as a fine art in providing proper stimuli to child 
activity and learning. The course includes systematic observa- 
tion and participation in the primary grades of the Training 
School. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, a course in 
Psychology or its equivalent. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
MacFadyen. (Ill) 

340. TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING IN THE GRAMMAR GRADES. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Fitzgerald. (Ill) 

421. READING METHODS FOR PRIMARY GRADES. 

This course deals with recent scientific investigation in the 
field of primary reading and the methods of teaching the subject 
in the first, second, and third grades. Studies of modern reading 
texts, required readings, discussions, and reports. This course 
includes systematic observation in the Training School. Two 
hours, first semester. Open to seniors and approved juniors. 
Prerequisite, approval of the instructor. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss MacFadyen. (Ill) 

423. PRIMARY CURRICULAR PROBLEMS. 

This course contains primary problems not covered in the other 
primary method courses, including methods in arithmetic, writ- 
ing, and spelling. The course includes systematic observation 
in the Training School. Two hours, first semester. Open to 
seniors and approved juniors. Prerequisite, approval of the in- 
structor. Credit, two semester hours. Miss MacFadyen. (Ill) 

424. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. 

This course will include an extensive study of children's litera- 
ture: the principles underlying the selection and organization 
of literary material for primary grades; dramatization and 
story-telling and other factors, including the activities of the 
children which influence oral and written speech. This course 
also includes systematic observation in the Training School. 
Two hours, second semester. Prerequisite, approval of the in- 
structor. Credit, two semester hours. Miss MacFadyen. (Ill) 



Department of Education 97 

431. EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENTS. 

A study of tests used in elementary grades, including giving 
tests in the Training School with tabulations and interpretations 
of results. One hour, second semester. Credit, one semester hour. 
Mr. Cook. (Ill) 

433. EDUCATION IN THE KINDERGARTEN. 

This course deals with the physical, mental, and social develop- 
ment of the kindergarten child. The activities, equipment, and 
methods obtaining in the kindergarten will be stressed. Observa- 
tion in the kindergarten and in the first grade of the Curry 
School is included as a part of the course. Two hours, second 
semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss MacFadyen. (Ill) 

443 and 444. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF THE CURRICULUM 
FOR INTERMEDIATE AND UPPER GRADES. 

Organization of the integrated curriculum for the intermediate 
and upper grades. The first semester will be devoted to arith- 
metic and the language arts; the second semester, to the physi- 
cal and social sciences. Observation in the Demonstration School. 
Three hours for the year. For seniors. Credit, six semester hours. 
Miss Fitzgerald. (Ill) 

446. LITERATURE FOR THE GRAMMAR GRADES. 

A study of literature suitable for children of the middle and 
upper grades and its place in an integrated curriculum. For 
seniors. Required for applicants for grammar grade certificates. 
Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Fitzgerald. (Ill) 

461r. TEACHING UNDER SUPERVISION. 

Students are assigned to the specific kind of teaching which they 
expect to do — elementary, primary, intermediate, upper grade, 
or high school. Students before arranging their college programs 
should consult the Training School program. 

The work is done in the Training School under the direction of 
the head of the department and under a supervisor for each grade 
or subject. After a period of observation, student teachers are 
made fully responsible for a certain part of the teaching through- 
out the semester, which includes the details of school management 
during their time of teaching. The same period each day for 
five days must be given to this work. Weekly and daily confer- 
ences are held by supervisors for constructive criticism of teach- 
ing and planning new lessons. The principles of the special 
method courses are continuously applied to teaching, so that 
theory may constantly function in the improvement of teaching 
skill and that experience in teaching may give meaning and in- 
terest to theory and principles. Daily work in Training School, 
either semester. Prerequisite, Education 320, 3U0, or 350, or equiv- 
alent; special methods should be taken conjointly. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Anselm and supervisors. (Ill) 



98 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

LIBRARY EDUCATION 

The following courses are designed to prepare teacher-librarians for 
part-time library work. They are to be given during the regular 
session and the summer session in a cumulative cycle. 

321. SCHOOL LIBRARY ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 

This course is designed to give a simple but comprehensive presen- 
tation of the purpose of the library in the school, its organization 
and administration. It includes the standards for planning and 
equipping the library, such technical processes as the acquisition 
and mechanical preparation of books; simple loan systems and 
the library records necessary for a small library; sources, care 
and use of pictures, pamphlets and other enrichment materials; 
library publicity; methods of efficient service and the contribu- 
tion of the library to effective teaching. Three hours, second se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Reger. (Ill) 

322. CLASSIFICATION AND CATALOGING. 

This course is an introduction to the principles of cataloging and 
classification. Training is given in the classification of books by 
the simplified Dewey Decimal system, the cataloging of the simpler 
types of book, the organization of a dictionary catalog, the use 
of the unit card system, the assignment of subject headings and 
book numbers and the making of a shelf list. Three laboratory 
and three recitation hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Reger. (Ill) 

323. BOOK SELECTION. 

The purpose of this course is to give, through the reading and 
examination of many books, a wide acquaintance with the infor- 
mational and recreational materials suitable for young people, 
and develop the ability to select books wisely for a school library. 
It includes a study of the reading interests of children of the 
adolescent age, direction in the use of bibliographic aids for book 
selection and training in the evaluation of books. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Reger. (Ill) 

324. REFERENCE. 

The aim of this course is to give a thorough acquaintance with 
the reference books needed in a small library, facility in their 
use, ability to judge their value and methods of using them in 
reference service with young people. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Reger. (Ill) 



Department of English 99 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Professors Smith, Hall, Taylor, Hurley, Dunn, Wil- 
son; Associate Professors Gould, Rowley, Tillett, 
Painter, Summerell, Friedlaender, Bridgers; In- 
structors Bush, Kohler, Shields, Mrs. Painter, 
Tatum, Sewell ; Assistant, Dorsett. 

Proficiency in written English is a requirement for graduation. 
Freshmen whose level of proficiency in English composition is 
below the required standard shall be enrolled in a course with- 
out credit until the required standard is attained. Any under- 
graduate whose work in any course gives evidence of lack of 
proficiency in written English shall be brought to the attention 
of a committee from the English Department. The committee 
after investigating the student's work will arrange for the re- 
moval of the deficiency and will determine when the deficiency 
has been removed. This Committee on the Use of English by 
Students is composed of the following members: Miss Sum- 
merell, Miss Kohler, Mr. Wilson. 

REQUIRED COURSES 

101 and 102. RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION. 

Reading and analysis of prose with emphasis on composition. 
Frequent themes; reports on assigned readings, and personal 
conferences. For Freshmen. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. Mr. Hurley, Mr. Dunn, Miss Gould, Miss 
Rowley, Mr. Wilson, Miss Tillett, Mr. Painter, Miss Summerell, 
Mr. Friedlaender, Mr. Bridgers, Miss Kohler, Miss Shields, Mrs. 
Painter, Miss Sewell. (I) 

211 and 212. LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION. 

A survey course of English literature down to the beginning of 
the twentieth century. Outlines, written themes, and oral re- 
ports. Personal conferences. For Sophomores. Three hours for 
the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Hall, Mr. Hurley, 
Miss Gould, Miss Rowley, Mr. Wilson, Miss Tillett, Mr. Painter, 
Miss Summerell, Mr. Bridgers, Miss Shields, Mr. Friedlaender, 
Miss Sewell. (II) 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Advisory Committee: Mr. Wilson, Mr. Hall, Mr. Hurley, Miss 
Summerell, Miss Tillett, Mr. Friedlaender. 

Subject to the approval of the head of the department, any of 
the following courses may be elected by juniors and seniors. 
They should be so selected, however, as to come under some 
general study scheme of literary periods, forms, and movements. 
It is important also that due consideration be given to a proper 
correlation of English with other subjects, notably Greek, 
Latin, the Romance Languages, German, History, and, for those 
who expect to teach, Education. Students who in the judgment 



100 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

of the Advisory Committee have a creditable record in the sub- 
ject may elect English as their major study. Such students 
will be expected to take not less than twenty-four nor more than 
thirty-six semester hours of English above Grade I, one course 
of which should be in prose. At least ten of the required semes- 
ter hours must be taken from the following: 

English 336: Chaucer; English 333, 334 or 339, 340: Shake- 
speare; English 341: Milton; English 359, 360: Eighteenth 
Century Prose; English 343, 344: Romanticism; English 345, 
346: Nineteenth Century Poets; English 347, 348: The English 
Novel; English 349: Spenser; English 350: Nineteenth Cen- 
tury Prose — The Essay; English 351, 352: American Litera- 
ture; English 395, 396: Anglo-Saxon, Middle English; English 
313, 314: The English Language. 

215. ADVANCED GRAMMAR. 

A course the basis of which is grammar, planned for those stu- 
dents who would understand more fully the fundamentals of 
speech and written composition. Ball's Constructive English is 
the text. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Prerequisite, English 101 and 102. Mr. Dunn. (II) 

217r. THE SPEAKING VOICE. 

The fundamentals of speech; mechanism of the voice; enuncia- 
tion and pronunciation; tone, color, and pitch; with exercises 
designed to overcome the defects of the individual voice. Two 
hours, either semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Taylor 
(II) 

221. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 

This course supplements the required course in composition. It 
is arranged especially for students who intend to make English 
their major subject. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Prerequisite, English 101 and 102. Miss Til- 
lett. (II) 

222. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 

A continuation of English 221, with special emphasis upon de- 
scription and narration. Students who have not had English 
221 should consult the instructor before registering for this 
course. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Tillett. (II) 

223. THE WRITING OF NEWS. 

An elementary course in journalism, with special emphasis on 
the gathering and writing of news. Students will study practical 
newspaper making in the plants of the local papers. Two hours, 
first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Dunn. (II) 

224. THE EDITING OF NEWS. 

This course is intended to supplement English 223 and will be 
concerned for the most part with newspaper desk work, includ- 
ing editing, headline writing, and make-up. Newspaper policies 
and methods will be considered, with a study of present-day 
tendencies. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Mr. Dunn. (II) 



Department op English 101 

262. THE CONTEMPORARY ESSAY. 

The modern essay, considered as a medium of contemporary 
expression. Essays by present-day American and English 
writers will be studied. Two hours, second semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Mr. Dunn. (II) 

271. THE LITERARY STUDY OF THE BIBLE. 

A reverently critical study of the Bible as a part of the world's 
great literature. The purpose sought in the course may be said 
to be a fuller comprehension of the truth of the Bible through 
a more intelligent appreciation of its excellencies of form and 
structure. Representative masterpieces will be considered — 
among them essays, orations, stories, and poems. Two hours, 
first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Smith. (II) 

272. THE LITERARY STUDY OF THE BIBLE. 

A continuation of Course 271. Two hours, second semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Smith. (II) 

279. STUDIES IN THE NOVEL. 

The course requires a critical reading of the major works of 
some one or two recognized masters among the old English 
novelists. One hour, first semester. Credit, one semester hour. 
Mr. Hurley. (II) 

280. STUDIES IN THE NOVEL. 

A continuation of English 279 with emphasis on the contem- 
porary novel. One hour, second semester. Credit, one semester 
hour. Mr. Hurley. (II) 

283. FAMILIAR LETTERS. 

A brief historical study of the familiar letter, followed by a 
closer study of letters, both English and American, since the 
early eighteenth century. Limited practice in writing. Two 
hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Sum- 
merell. (II) 

284. THE SHORT STORY. 

A study of the history and development of the short story with 
analysis and discussion of the best classic and contemporary 
stories, both European and American. Three hours, second se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Rowley. (II) 

285. REPRESENTATIVE AMERICAN PLAYS. 

The course will be a brief history of the American theatre. Due 
attention will be paid to the influence of actors and actresses 
and producers on the development of the drama, together with 
a consideration of the plays of representative playwrights. 
Three hours for the first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Taylor. (II) 

291. EUGENE O'NEILL AND THE EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE. 
A study of recent experimentalists in drama with chief empha- 
sis on O'Neill as the American exponent. One hour, first semes- 
ter. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Taylor. (II) 



102 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

292. PLAYS OF GEORGE BERNARD SHAW. 

A study of Shaw's contribution to the theatre and of his signifi- 
cance in the literary world of the last four decades. One hour, 
second semester. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Taylor. (II) 

813. THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 

The origin and nature of language. The Indo-European lan- 
guages. The vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation of the 
earlier periods of English as related to modern English. The 
influence of other languages — especially Greek, Latin, and 
French — upon English; prefixes, suffixes, derivatives; seman- 
tics; current spelling; proper names. Both this course and its 
companion course, 314, will be taught with the view of provid- 
ing students with an intelligent understanding of their language 
for use in life as well as in teaching. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Wilson. (Ill) 

314. THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 

A study of the three types of American pronunciation and of 
Southern British pronunciation. Attention will be given to 
Southern American pronunciation in its historical relation to 
the British. Discussion of the "standards" of speech. Critical 
examination and frequent use of the leading British and Ameri- 
can dictionaries. The alphabet of the International Phonetic 
Association will be used. See English 313. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Wilson. (Ill) 

325. CREATIVE WRITING. 

Advanced composition, including practice in the short story, the 
essay, and other literary forms. Lectures, readings from mod- 
ern and contemporary literature in each of the forms studied. 
A limited number of students will be admitted to this course. 
Students desiring to take the course should consult the instruc- 
tor before registering. Two hours, for the first semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Mr. Dunn. (Ill) 

326. CREATIVE WRITING. 

A continuation of English 325. Students desiring to take this 
course should consult the instructor before registering. Two 
hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Dunn. 
(HI) 

327 and 328. PLAY PRODUCTION. 

A study of the cultural and educative possibilities of amateur 
dramatics. Especially recommended to prospective teachers and 
social workers who will be called upon to coach amateur theatri- 
cals in their schools and communities. Theory and laboratory 
work in directing, acting, scene-designing, costuming, lighting, 
make-up and stage-setting. Plays will be studied and presented 
in class. # Two lecture and three laboratory hours for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 per semester. 
Mr. Taylor, Miss Tatum. (Ill) 

329 and 330. PLAY WRITING AND ADVANCED PRODUCTION. 
Seminar in the theory and practice of dramatic technique. A 
student not primarily interested in the actual writing of plays 



Department of English 103 

may take this course and fulfill its requirements in part by- 
working out problems of production, although a certain amount 
of dramatic composition will be required of everyone. The 
number of students admitted to the course must be limited to 
twelve. Three hours, for the year. Prerequisite, English 327 
and 328, and the approval of the instructor. Credit, six semester 
hours. Mr. Taylor. (Ill) 

333. THE SHAKESPEARIAN THEATRE. 

A study of Shakespeare and his contemporaries in the theatre: 
playwrights, producers, technicians. They will be considered as 
practical men of the theatre whose first purpose was to furnish 
entertainment and instruction for Elizabeth and her London. 
Certain plays will be studied intensively, and (if the personnel 
of the class warrants) will be produced in part or as a whole. 
The style, manner, and staging of these productions will be as 
nearly like that actually practiced by Shakespeare as is possible. 
Junior and senior elective. Open to specially qualified sopho- 
mores by permission of the head of the English department and 
of the instructor. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two se- 
mester hours. Mr. Taylor. (Ill) 

334. THE SHAKESPEARIAN THEATRE. 

A continuation of English 333. Method, nature, and objectives 
will be the same, except that different plays will be studied and 
produced. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Mr. Taylor. (Ill) 

336. CHAUCER. 

A study of the major and certain of the minor poems of Chau- 
cer, with literary rather than linguistic emphasis. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Sum- 
merell. (Ill) 

339. SHAKESPEARE. 

A study of the plays which were written before 1600 will be 
undertaken. Preliminary consideration will be given to the 
drama and theatre out of which the plays were evolved, to the 
biographical and social background in so far as they can be 
shown to have influenced the composition of the plays, and to 
those linguistic, textual, and psychological barriers which con- 
front the modern reader. The lectures will be supplemented 
each week by small discussion groups in which the student will 
be expected to participate actively. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Friedlaender. (Ill) 

340. SHAKESPEARE. 

A continuation of Course 339; the plays written after 1600. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Friedlaender. (Ill) 

341. MILTON. 

A study of the poetry of Milton culminating in Paradise Lost, 
with outside assignments in his prose and in other literature of 
the Puritan period. Special attention is given to the chief ideas 
m the poems, and to the development of Milton's personal 



104 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

powers against the social, political, and religious background of 
the seventeenth century. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Rowley. (Ill) 

343. ROMANTICISM IN ENGLISH POETRY, 1780-1805. 

The new interest in external nature, the influence of democracy, 
and the subjective attitude toward life and literature will be 
studied, with attention to such writers as Cowper, Burns, Blake, 
and more especially, Wordsworth and Coleridge. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Tillett. (Ill) 

344. THE LATER ROMANTICISTS, 1805-1825. 

A continuation of Course 343. The second semester will be de- 
voted to the study of Scott, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Tillett. (Ill) 

345. BRITISH POETS OP THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. 

A study of the poetry of Tennyson and Arnold, with outside 
assignments on Clough, Swinburne, and Rossetti. Emphasis is 
given to the oral interpretation of poetry and especially to its 
vitality as embodying the higher ideals of modern thought and 
conduct. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Prerequisite, six semester hours of English Literature. Mr. 
Smith. (Ill) 

346. BRITISH POETS OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. 

The poetry of Robert Browning. An interpretative study of 
Browning's Lyrics, Romances, Men and Women, Dramatis Per- 
sonae, and a selected number of tragedies. Two hours, second 
semester. Credit, two semester hours. Prerequisite, six semester 
hours of English Literature. Mr. Smith. (Ill) 

347. THE NOVEL. 

An historical and critical survey of the English novel from 
Richardson to the twentieth century. Three hours, first se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hurley. (Ill) 

348. THE CONTEMPORARY NOVEL. 

This course is intended to introduce to the student the notable 
English novelists of the twentieth century, and to help her to 
evaluate the newer books in terms of modern life as well as of 
literary art. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Mr. Hurley. (Ill) 

349. SPENSER AND THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE. 

The course will include all the important Elizabethans except 
Shakespeare, and will emphasize certain of the critical and so- 
cial ideals of the English Renaissance. Three hours, first se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Gould. (Ill) 

350. NINETEENTH CENTURY PROSE: THE ESSAY. 

A study of the great prose writers of the nineteenth century and 
of their influence upon contemporary life and thought. In par- 
ticular Lamb, De Quincey, Macaulay, Carlyle, Newman, Ruskin, 
Arnold, and Stevenson will be studied. Three hours, second se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Gould. (Ill) 



Department of English 105 

351. AMERICAN LITERATURE. 

A survey of the early periods of American life and literature 
with especial study of the beginnings of romanticism, and with 
emphasis upon the expansion of our literature in Irving, Cooper, 
Bryant, Poe, and Hawthorne. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hall. (Ill) 

352. AMERICAN LITERATURE. 

A critical study of Emerson, Longfellow, Whittier, Holmes, 
Whitman, Lanier, and writers of the West. The emphasis, as 
in English 351, will be upon the expression of the national char- 
acter and upon the originality of the contribution made by these 
writers. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Hall. (Ill) 

353. AMERICAN LITERATURE: THE NOVEL. 

The beginnings of American fiction in the eighteenth century 
and its development through the nineteenth will be studied in 
relation to the growth of fiction writing as an art and the re- 
flection of changing phases of American life. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hurley. (Ill) 

354. AMERICAN LITERATURE: PROSE WRITERS OF THE PAST 

FIFTY YEARS. 
A study of American literature since the 1880's as an expression 
of the social and intellectual conditions of the American people. 
Special attention is given to the prose literature of New Eng- 
land, the West, and the South following the Reconstruction 
Period, and to the general tendencies of American literature 
since 1890. Reports on assigned topics are required. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Hurley. (Ill) 

356. THE FRONTIER IN THE LITERATURE OF THE SOUTH 

AND THE WEST. 
A study of the literature and literary influences of the frontier 
in the South, Southwest, and West. An attempt will be made 
to relate the vitality of modern American literature to the so- 
cial, political, and philosophical forces emerging from the ad- 
vancing frontier. Ballads, cowboy songs, and writings of such 
humorists as Crockett, Longstreet, Baldwin, Bill Arp, Harris, 
Josh Billings, John Phoenix, Locke, Artemus Ward, Harte, and 
Mark Twain will be emphasized. The course will involve read- 
ings in and reports on significant phases of frontier life and 
literature. (History 335 furnishes an excellent background for 
this course.) Two hours, second semester. Credit, two se- 
mester hours. Mr. Hall. (Ill) 

357. CONTEMPORARY POETRY. 

A study of contemporary poets whose writings reflect the chang- 
ing social, political, and ethical conventions of our present civil- 
ization. Such representative English and American poets as 
Gibson, Brooke, Yeats, Hardy, Housman, Kipling, De LaMare, 
Noyes, Masefield, Amy Lowell, Robinson, Frost, Masters, Emily 
Dickinson, Millay, Sandburg and Lindsay will be studied. Two 
hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Prerequisite, 
six semester hours of English Literature. Mr. Smith. (Ill) 



106 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

358. CONTEMPORARY POETRY. 

A continuation of Course 357. Two hours, second semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Prerequisite, six semester hours of 
English Literature. Mr. Smith. (Ill) 

359. PROSE STUDIES IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 

This course entails an intensive study of Defoe and the rise of 
periodical literature; satires of Addison, Steele, and Swift; and 
the conflicting philosophies of Shaftesbury and Mandeville. In 
the field of drama the transition between restoration ideals and 
those of the emerging middle class will be considered in the 
works of Farquhar, Congreve, Steele, and Lillo. Two hours, first 
semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Painter. (Ill) 

360. PROSE STUDIES IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 

A study of English life and thought as manifested in the va- 
rious literary impulses of the latter half of the century. Two 
hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Painter. (Ill) 

376. THE PROSE AND POETRY OF MATTHEW ARNOLD. 

A study of the poetry and literary essays of Arnold. One hour, 
second semester. Credit, one semester hour. Prerequisite, six 
semester hours of English Literature. Mr. Smith. (Ill) 

382. STUDIES IN MODERN DRAMA. 

Such representative writers as Ibsen, Hauptmann, Sudermann, 
Brieux, Hervieu, Rostand, Maeterlinck, Shaw, Barrie, Synge, 
Echegaray, Drinkwater, Moody, and O'Neill will be studied. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Taylor. (Ill) 

393. BIOGRAPHY. 

An historical and critical study of European and American 
biography from the time of Plutarch to the nineteenth century. 
Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Tillett. (Ill) 

394. BIOGRAPHY. 

A study of nineteenth and twentieth century biography with 
particular emphasis upon recent interpretation of the form. 
Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Tillett. (Ill) 

395. ANGLO-SAXON. 

An introductory course. Grammar and readings in Anglo- 
Saxon prose and poetry. In both this course and English 396 a 
comparative study between Anglo-Saxon and modern English 
will be made with the view of securing a more comprehensive 
understanding of modern word usage and problems in modern 
grammar. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Wilson. (Ill) 

396. MIDDLE ENGLISH. 

Grammar and readings in Middle English prose and poetry; a 
study of Middle English language and literature. See Course 
395. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Wilson. (Ill) 



Department of German 107 

397. ENGLISH LITERATURE AND THE CLASSICS. 

The same as CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 397. 

398. ENGLISH LITERATURE AND THE CLASSICS. 

The same as CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION 398. 

449. CO-ORDINATING COURSE: READINGS IN ENGLISH LIT- 
ERATURE. 
This course offers the English major an opportunity to round 
out her knowledge of English Literature by reading under 
supervision in those fields with which she needs to be better 
acquainted. For Seniors who elect English as their major 
study. Three hours, first semester. Mr. Smith, Mr. Hurley, 
Mr. Wilson, Mr. Painter, and Mr. Friedlaender. (Ill) 

DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Professor Schoch ; Instructor von Westen. 

Students who do not offer any German for entrance will take 
German 101 and 102. Students offering two and three units of 
German will take German 103 and 104, 105 and 106, 205 and 206, 
or 211 and 212 according to ability. 

Not all courses 215-401 will be given in any one year; a selection 
meeting as far as possible the needs and desires of the students 
choosing the courses will be made. The time for recitation will 
then be arranged. As far as practicable, German is the language 
of the classroom. 

101 and 102. ELEMENTARY COURSE. 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
Schoch and Miss von Westen. 

103 and 104. INTERMEDIATE COURSE. 

First semester, brief grammar review; Novellen, and Kultur- 
kunde. Second semester, Schiller's Wilhelm Tell or its equivalent, 
poems, and contemporary stories or plays. Three hours for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Schoch or Miss von Westen. 

105 and 106. SPECIAL INTERMEDIATE COURSE. 

A more thorough grammar review; Novellen, Kulturkunde, mod- 
ern stories and plays. Three hours for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. Miss von Westen. 

205 and 206. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE. 

Representative works in prose and verse. Three hours for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Schoch or Miss von Westen. 

207 and 208. GRAMMAR REVIEW AND ADVANCED GRAMMAR. 
This course may be taken in conjunction with any course above 
101 and 102. Required of students wishing to teach German. 
One hour for the year. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Schoch. 

209 and 210. SCIENTIFIC GERMAN. 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. At the 
discretion of the instructor, the course may be taken instead of 
German 103 and 10 J+. Miss von Westen. 



108 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

211. ELEMENTARY COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION. 

This course may be pursued with Course 103 or Course 105 as a 
sophomore elective. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss von Westen. (II) 

212. ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION. 

This course may be pursued with Course 10 U or Course 106 as a 
sohphomore elective. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss von Westen. (II) 

315 and 316. BRIEF HISTORY OP GERMAN LITERATURE. 

A study of the literary movements and of individual authors 
from early times to the present with special emphasis on his- 
torical, political, and philosophical backgrounds, social tenden- 
cies, and accompanying expressions of music and art in their 
relations to the development of German literature. Majors are 
required to take this course collaterally with course 317 and 318. 
Prerequisite, at least two years of college German or the equiva- 
lent. One hour for the year. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Schoch or Miss von Westen. 

317 and 318. SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE. 

A study of literary productions and excerpts of outstanding works 
exemplifying various movements of German literature and the 
works of individual authors from early times to the present. 
Majors are required to take this course collaterally with Course 
315 and 316. Prerequisite, at least two years of college German 
or the equivalent. Two hours for the year. Credit, four semester 
hours. Miss Schoch or Miss von Westen. 

319 and 320. GERMAN CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE. 

Essentially a reading course which will give the students a store 
of interesting and valuable information and will, at the same 
time, enable them to acquire vocabularies for a reading knowledge 
of geography and history, literary and art criticisms. Pre- 
requisite, two years of college German or the equivalent. Two 
hours for the year. Credit, four semester hours. Miss Schoch or 
Miss von Westen. (Ill) 

321 and 322. GOETHE'S LIFE AND SELECTED WORKS. 

Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
Schoch. (Ill) 

325 and 326. GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE NINTEENTH AND 
TWENTIETH CENTURIES. 
Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss von 
Westen. (Ill) 

329 and 330. GERMAN CLASSICS IN ENGLISH. 

A general-culture course designed to acquaint the student with 
representative masterpieces of German literature. Lectures on 
the literary movements in Germany from medieval times to the 
present. One hour for the year. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Schoch. 

331. LESSING. 

Three hours for the first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Schoch. (Ill) 



Department of Health 109 

332. SCHILLER. 

Three hours for the second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Schoch. (Ill) 

363 and 364. TEACHING GERMAN IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS. 

Prerequisite, two years beyond the intermediate course. One hour 
for the year. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Schoch. (Ill) 

401. GOETHE'S FAUST. 

Three hours either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Schoch. (IV) 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

Medical Division: Dr. Collings, Dr. Gove, Dr. Evers- 
meyer. Hygiene : Professor Carlsson ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Harris ; Instructor Shamburger. 

101r. HYGIENE. 

A practical course designed to place before each student the 
ideal of a well-balanced program for daily living and to empha- 
size her obligation to serve society by the promotion of indi- 
vidual, family, and public health. Three hours for one semester. 
Required of all freshmen except those in the Home Economics 
course. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Carlsson, Miss Harris, 
Miss Shamburger. (I) 

103. HYGIENE. 

A practical course designed to help students to direct their ac- 
tivities in accordance with modern health standards. Required 
of all one-year Commercial students. Two hours, one semester. 
Miss Harris, Miss Shamburger. (I) 

231. PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC HEALTH. 

A general survey of the field of public health including a con- 
sideration of the causes, prevention and control of disease; 
conservation of maternal, infant and child life. Special study 
will be made of governmental and voluntary health agencies. 
Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Hygiene 101 or 
Physiology 277 and six semester hours in Biology or Chemistry. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Carlsson. (Ill) 

236. FIRST AID. 

First Aid, theory and demonstrations, and practice. Official course 
leading to full Red Cross certification. One hour, first semester. 
Credit, one semester hour. Dr. Collings. (II) Required of 
Juniors in Physical Education. Elective for others. 

269r. CHILD HYGIENE. 

Development and care of the child from prenatal life through 
adolescence. Three hours, each semester. Prerequisite, Hygiene 
101 or Physiology 277. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Carls- 
son. (II) 



110 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

332. SCHOOL HYGIENE. 

For those who expect to teach, this course supplies basic in- 
formation in health education. Members of the class will par- 
ticipate in health teaching. Two hours, second semester. Pre- 
requisite, nine semseter hours, Hygiene 101, Education, one 
course, and General Biology or Chemistry. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Carlsson. (Ill) 

364. MEDICAL INFORMATION FOR SOCIAL WORKERS. 

Medical background for social case work. A survey of modern 
methods of medical diagnosis and treatment, with special em- 
phasis on diseases likely to be encountered by the social worker. 
Three hours, second semester. Restricted to students specializing 
in the field of case work. Open to others only by special permis- 
sion. Credit, three semester hours. Dr. Collings. (Ill) 

467. HEALTH EDUCATION. 

A study of aims, methods, and materials for health teaching, 
class observation, and practice teaching in elementary and sec- 
ondary schools. Two hours, first semester. Required of seniors 
in the Bachelor of Science in Physical Education course. Elective 
for other seniors. Prerequisite, nine semester hours, Hygiene 
101, Education one course, and General Biology or Chemistry. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Carlsson. (Ill) 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 
HISTORY 

Professors Kendrick, Johns, Arnett; Associate Pro- 
fessors Gullander, Largent, Draper ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Pfaff; Instructors Hege, McFadyen, Mrs. 
Pfaff. 

101r. and 102r. MODERN EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION. 

The study of European civilization from the eighteenth century 
to the present. A secondary aim of the course is to interpret 
present-day institutions and problems in terms of their origins 
and development. Three hours for the year. For freshmen. 
Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Johns, Mr. Arnett, Mr. Pfaff, 
Miss Gullander, Miss Largent, Miss Draper, Miss Hege, Miss 
McFadyen, Mrs. Pfaff. (I) 

105r. CURRENT EVENTS AND PROBLEMS. 

An elementary survey of events of current interest, emphasizing 
particularly causes of conflict between nations, and social and 
economic problems of present day American life. Magazines 
and newspapers will be used, and an effort will be made to teach 
students how to discriminate between biased and unbiased articles. 
Two hours either semester. Elective for freshmen and sopho- 
mores. Credit, two semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Miss 
Gullander. 



Department of History and Political Science 111 

211. THE UNITED STATES TO 1865. 

A general survey of the political, social, and economic history of 
the period. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Kendrick, Mr. Johns, Miss Draper, Miss Largent. (II) 

212r. THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1865. 

A continuation of 211 but may be taken separately either se- 
mester by B.S.S.A. students in fulfillment of their sophomore 
requirement in recent American history. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Kendrick, Mr. Johns, Miss Draper, Miss Largent. (II) 



Elective Courses 

All elective courses numbered "200" require one year of history 
as prerequisite except by permission of the head of the depart- 
ment. All "300" courses require one year of history and /or junior 
or senior standing (except by permission of the department 
head). 

255. THE RENAISSANCE. 

A study of the background, causes, and progress of the intellec- 
tual and cultural movements in Europe in the fourteenth, fif- 
teenth, and sixteenth centuries. Two hours, first semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Draper. (II) 
(Offered in 1940-1941 and alternate years.) 

256. THE REFORMATION. 

A study of the reformation period in European history. Two 

hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Draper. 

(II) 

(Offered in 1941 and alternate years.) 

273. ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL ENGLAND. 

A study of the principal economic and social problems of Eng- 
land from the Middle Ages to the eighteenth century. Two hours, 
first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Gullander. (II) 
(Offered in 1941-1942 and alternate years.) 

274. ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL ENGLAND. 

A continuation of 273 from the eighteenth century to the present. 
Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Gullander. (II) 
(Offered in 1942 and alternate years.) 

283 and 284. CURRENT PROBLEMS. 

A study of current affairs, particularly those of an economic and 
social character. Leading periodicals will be used as texts. One 
hour for the year. Credit, two semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$1.25 a semester. Mr. Arnett. (II) 

333 and 334. REPRESENTATIVE AMERICANS. 

A study of the representative men and women in various phases 
of American life. One hour for the year. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Alexander. 



112 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

337. THE AMERICAN COLONIES. 

Special emphasis will be placed on the social, economic, and 
constitutional development of the English colonies down to the 
American Revolution. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Johns. (Ill) 
(Offered in 1941-1942 and alternate years.) 

343. NORTH CAROLINA TO 1835. 

A general course in the history of the Colony and the State to 
1835. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Mr. Arnett. (Ill) 

344. NORTH CAROLINA SINCE 1835. 

A continuation of 343 from 1835 to the present. Two hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Arnett. (Ill) 

346. THE SOUTH. 

A study of the part the South has had in the history of the 
Nation. (This course offers a particularly good background for 
English 356.) Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Kendrick. (Ill) 
(Offered in 1940-41 and alternate years) 

348. THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1914. 

This course is intended for students who wish to familiarize 
themselves with the history of the United States during their 
own life-time. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Kendrick. (Ill) 
(Offered in 1941-1942 and alternate years.) 

353. ANCIENT CIVILIZATION. 

Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Kendrick. (Ill) 

354. MEDIEVAL CIVILIZATION. 

Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Draper. (Ill) 

361. THE AGE OF ABSOLUTISM. 

A survey of the Age of Louis XIV and the Old Regime in Europe. 
Emphasis will be placed upon all phases of French development 
as typical of Europe and as background for the French Revolu- 
tion. The development of totalitarianism in government at the 
same time as liberalism in thought will be considered. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Lar- 
gent. (Ill) 
(Offered in 1940-1941 and alternate years.) 

362. THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. 

A survey of the background of the French Revolution as it de- 
veloped between 1750 and 1789 and a study of the Revolution 
through 1795. Emphasis will be placed upon the struggle for 
social, economic, and political democracy. Both in this and in 
History 361 some attention will be given to historical method. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Largent. (Ill) 
(Offered in 1940-41 and alternate years) 



Department of History and Political Science 113 

363. THE NAPOLEONIC ERA. 

A study of the Directory and the Napoleonic State from 1795 to 
1815. Special attention will be given to the influence of the 
Napoleonic system upon Europe and the world. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Pf aff . (Ill) 
(Offered in 1941-1942 and alternate years.) 

364. EUROPE FROM 1815 TO 1870. 

Particular emphasis will be given to economic and political 
liberalism, romanticism, nationalism, and the beginnings of mod- 
ern imperialism. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Pfaff. (Ill) 
(Offered in 1941-1942 and alternate years.) 

365. EUROPE FROM 1870 TO 1914. 

The growth of nationalism, industrialism, imperialism, militarism 
and the secret alliances that finally produced the World War. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Arnett. (Ill) 

366. EUROPE FROM 1914 TO THE PRESENT. 

The war, the resulting revolutions and the early spread of de- 
mocracy and pacifism, the work of the League of Nations, the 
rise of Communism and Fascism, and the growth of militant 
nationalism. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Arnett. (Ill) 

449. HISTORY. A CO-ORDINATING COURSE. 

This course covers the general field of history and stresses inter- 
relations and interpretations. To be conducted in seminar form, 
at hours to be arranged. Given by the members of the Depart- 
ment of History. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Required of all senior History majors. (IV) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Elliott; Associate Professor Alexander; Instructor 
Hege. 

All courses in Political Science carry credit as History. 

321r. THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. 

This course will be a study of the government of the United 
States. Origin, organization, and development will be emphasized. 
Special attention will be given to the Government in action — 
elections, law-making, and administration. Three hours, either 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Elliott, Miss Alex- 
ander, Miss Hege. (Ill) 

322. THE STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT. 

A continuation of course 321 with attention paid to the same 
questions in the state and local fields. Three hours, second semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Alexander. (Ill) 

324. WORLD POLITICS. 

In this course a survey of world politics since 1848 will be made. 
Important treaties, the partition of Africa, the Far East prob- 
lem, the position of the small and weak states, and the recent 



114 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

efforts to organize the nations of the world will be studied. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Elliott. (Ill) 

325. MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT. 

The study will include surveys of the different forms of city 
government, its functions, and its problems of administration. 
The possible reforms in municipal government will be discussed. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Alexander. (Ill) 
(Offered in 1941-1942 and alternate years.) 

327. AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES. 

In this course a survey will be made of the development of polit- 
ical parties. Party organizations and activities will be studied. 
Nominations, campaign methods, and party reforms will be dis- 
cussed. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Alexander. (Ill) 
(Offered in 1940-1941 and alternate years.) 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Professors Edwards, Campbell, Swanson; Associate 
Professors Playfoot, Tansil; Assistant Professors 
Edwards, Street, Rosa, Naumann, Coxe; Field 
Teacher Trainer Allen ; Instructors Howell, Forbes, 
Bowers ; Assistants Cooke, Surratt. 

The specialized undergraduate curricula in home economics in- 
clude General Home Economics, Clothing and Textiles, Foods 
and Nutrition, Housing, Home Relationships and Child De- 
velopment, Home Economics Education, and Institution Econom- 
ics. The General Home Economics curriculum is planned pri- 
marily for students interested in homemaking and home eco- 
nomics journalism. The Clothing and Textile curricula are 
planned for students primarily interested in clothing design, 
textile testing and various types of department store work. The 
Foods and Nutrition curricula are planned for students inter- 
ested in specialized study of nutrition, nutrition work in public 
welfare programs, experimental food study and food demon- 
stration work. The Housing curricula are organized for stu- 
dents interested in the specialized study of house planning and 
home furnishing, experimental equipment study, and multiple- 
house management. The Home Relationships and Child Devel- 
opment curriculum is organized primarily for students inter- 
ested in nursery school and parent education teaching. The 
Home Economics Education curricula are planned for home 
economics students who expect to teach in high school or enter 
cooperative extension service. The Institution Economics cur- 
ricula are organized for students planning to enter the fields of 
hospital dietetics, school lunch room management, institution 
house administration and other types of institutional work. 



Department of Home Economics 115 

CLOTHING AND TEXTILES 

lOlr. CLOTHING SELECTION AND CONSTRUCTION. 

The factors that influence the individual in the selection, pur- 
chase, and construction of clothing as revealed by self -analysis ; 
knowledge of clothing fabrics; the clothing budget; wardrobe 
buying procedures. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory 
each week. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Mrs. Street, Mrs". Surratt. (I) 

231r. STAGE COSTUMING. 

This course includes a study of historic and modern costume as 
it affects the designing of stage costumes. It is especially planned 
for Play-Liker members, dance, music, and home economics 
majors. One lecture and two three-hour laboratories each week. 
No prerequisite. Elective. Credit, three semester hours. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00. Misses Naumann and Coxe. (II) 

301r. PATTERN STUDY AND CONSTRUCTION. 

Advanced study of textile fabrics; the foundation pattern, flat 
pattern construction; construction of garments from designed 
patterns. One lecture and two three-hour laboratories each week. 
Prerequisites, Home Economics 101 and Art 101. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Coxe. (Ill) 

311r. COSTUME DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. 

This course includes the application of art principles to dress, 
the study of current styles, ways of identifying clothes with the 
wearer, and discussions of fashion influences, trends and pre- 
dictions. During the laboratory periods actual clothing and dress 
accessories are designed and constructed. Two lectures and one 
three-hour laboratory each week. Prerequisites, Art 101 and 
Home Economics 101. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. Miss Naumann. (Ill) 

331. HISTORY OF COSTUME. 

This course includes a study of the historic, literary, and artis- 
tic backgrounds related to the costumes of various countries 
from the earliest civilizations to the present day and their rela- 
tion to present dress. Three lectures each week. Prerequisites, 
History 101 and 102, Home Economics 311, or approved equi- 
valents. Elective. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Naumann. 
(Ill or IV) 

401. ADVANCED CLOTHING CONSTRUCTION. 

The development of understanding and appreciation of the use 
of line, form, texture, and color through modeling, draping, and 
construction of garments on the form and human figure. One 
lecture and two three-hour laboratories each week. Prerequisites, 
Home Economics 301 and 311. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Coxe. (Ill) 

411. ADVANCED COSTUME DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION. 

This course includes the advanced and creative study of cos- 
tume design and its relation to fashion, materials, the human 
form, accessories, use and the principles of design. During the 
laboratory periods actual clothing and accessories are designed 
and constructed. One lecture and two three-hour laboratories 



116 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

each week. Prerequisite, Home Economics 311. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Naumann. (Ill or 
IV) 

421. HISTORIC TEXTILES. 

This course includes a study of the historic and artistic back- 
grounds related to the textiles of various countries from the 
early Egyptian civilization to modern times. The characteristic 
fibers, weaves, motifs, and dyes used in these textiles will be 
studied. Three lectures each week. Selected field trip required. 
Prerequisites, History 101 and 102, Home Economics 101 or ap- 
proved equivalents. Elective. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Naumann. (Ill or IV) 
(Not given 1940-41.) 

431. DECORATIVE TEXTILES. 

This course includes a study of the application of art principles 
in planning and executing stitchery designs for articles which 
may be used in home furnishing and costume designing. Two 
lectures and one three-hour laboratory each week. Elective. 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Miss Nau- 
mann. (Ill) 
(Not given 1940-41) 

441. TEXTILE ANALYSIS. 

A study of the chemical and physical properties of the textile 
fibers; yarn and cloth construction; finish of fabrics; standard 
testing methods used; test results interpreted in terms of con- 
sumer information. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory 
each week. Prerequisites, Home Economics 101, Chemistry 231 
and 332; Physics 101 and 102 or approved equivalent. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Coxe. (Ill 
or IV) 

451. CLOTHING FOR CHILDREN. 

The selection and construction of children's clothing as related 
to the development of the child ; brief study of children's clothing 
through the ages. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory 
each week. Prerequisite, Home Economics 101. Credit, two 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Coxe. (Ill or IV) 
(Not given 1940-41.) 

461. CO-ORDINATING COURSE. CLOTHING AND TEXTILE ECO- 
NOMICS. 
The economic aspects of the production, distribution, and use of 
clothing and textiles, directly or indirectly affecting the con- 
sumer; clothing selection and needs of the individual and family 
on different income levels; responsibility of the consumer in re- 
lation to conditions in the textile and clothing industry; stan- 
dardization, labeling, and shopping ethics of clothing and tex- 
tile goods. Three lectures each week. Credit, three semester 
hours. Misses Coxe and Naumann. (Ill or IV) 



Department of Home Economics 117 

FOOD AND NUTRITION 

203r. FOOD SELECTION AND PREPARATION. 

A study of foods designed to give the student a scientific un- 
derstanding of the function of foods, a knowledge of the funda- 
mental principles of cookery, and the ability to utilize such know- 
ledge in the selection, preparation and service of standard pro- 
ducts. One lecture and two three-hour laboratories each week. 
Prerequisites, Chemistry 101 and 102, or 103 and 104, or indivi- 
dual approval. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$4.00. Mrs. Edwards, Miss Howell, and Mrs. Surratt. (I) 

213. NUTRITION. 

A study of the nutritive requirements of the body; dietaries for 
various ages, with special emphasis on child feeding; diet in 
relation to the prevention and treatment of disease. Menu plan- 
ning, food selection and preparation for camps will be empha- 
sized in the laboratory. Two lectures and one three-hour labora- 
tory each week. Credit, three semester hours, second semester. 
Laboratory fee, $2.50. Prerequisite or parallel, Chemistry 101 
and 102 or 103 and 104. Required of Physical Education majors. 
Elective. Mrs. Edwards. (II) 

303r. MEAL STUDY. 

This course includes the study of meal planning, marketing and 
costs; the selection, preparation, and service of foods in rela- 
tion to meals. The relations of selection, arrangement, and use 
of equipment and furnishings, the planning and use of time, and 
the techniques of operation to efficient and aesthetic meal ser- 
vice are emphasized. Two lectures and one three-hour labora- 
tory each week. Prerequisite, Home Economics 203. Credit r 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Howell. (Ill) 

313r. NUTRITION AND DIETETICS. 

This course aims to give the student a knowledge of the funda- 
mental principles of nutrition, and to develop the ability to 
utilize this knowledge in the planning of adequate dietaries for 
the normal individual and for the family group living at differ- 
ent economic levels. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory 
each week. Prerequisites, Chemistry 231 and 332, Home Eco- 
nomics 303 (or parallel). Credit, three semester hours. Labora- 
tory fee, $4.00. Mrs. Edwards. (Ill) 

323. EXPERIMENTAL FOOD STUDY. 

This course aims to give the student an insight into experi- 
mental procedure through (a) review of recent experimental 
food studies, (b) laboratory investigation of factors regulating 
standards in food products and preparation. Two lectures and 
one three-hour laboratory each week. Prerequisites, Home Eco- 
nomics 313 and Physics 101 and 102 (or parallel) or approved 
equivalents. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mrs. Edwards. (Ill or IV) 
(Not given 1940-41.) 

343. FAMILY NUTRITION. 

The study of family dietary standards, emphasizing food values, 
meal planning, preparation and service adapted to different in- 
come levels. Special consideration will be given to food bud- 



118 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

gets, child feeding, special diets, marketing and food costs in 
relation to income. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory 
each week. Prerequisite, one year of science and junior-senior 
ranking. Elective for Sociology majors and others. Credit, three 
semester hours. First semester. Laboratory fee, $4.00.. Mrs. 
Edwards. (Ill) 

403. DIET THERAPY. 

This course deals with the modification of the normal diet to 
meet the dietary requirements of pathological and special con- 
ditions which depend largely on diet for treatment. Three lec- 
tures each week. Prerequisites, Home Economics 313. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mrs. Edwards. (Ill or IV) 

413. NUTRITION OF DEVELOPMENT. 

This course relates the normal development and optimal health 
of the child to his nutritional needs from conception through 
adolescence. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory each 
week. Credit, three semester hours. Prerequisite, Home Eco- 
nomics 313. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Mrs. Edwards. (Ill or IV) 

433. CO-ORDINATING COURSE. FOOD ECONOMICS. 

This course deals with the problems of food production, distri- 
bution, and selection; markets and marketing; food standardiza- 
tion and prices ; food utilization in the home. Three lectures each 
week. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Edwards, Miss Howell. 
(Ill or IV) 
(Not given 1940-1941) 

HOUSING 

205r. THE HOUSE AND ITS FURNISHINGS. 

In this course a study is made of the planning and furnishing 
of houses. The laboratory work includes the practical problems 
of house planning in relation to family needs and income, the 
actual arrangement of furniture and furnishings, the construc- 
tion of various furnishings and accessories, the remodeling and 
refurnishing of a college girl's room, and special house and room 
remodeling. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory each 
week. Prerequisite, Art 101. Credit, three semester hours. Lab- 
oratory fee, $2.00. Miss Naumann. (II) 

305. HOUSING. 

The study of modern housing from the economic and social angles 
as concerned with house planning, building, building regula- 
tions, legislation, financing, and recent developments in housing. 
Two lectures each week. Prerequisite, Home Economics 205, or 
by individual approval. Elective. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Edwards. (Ill or IV) 
(Not given 1940-41) 

315. HISTORY OF FURNITURE. 

This course includes a study of the historic background related 
to furniture of various countries from early civilization to mod- 
ern times. Three lectures each week. Selected field trip required. 
Prerequisites, History 101 and 102, Home Economics 205 or ap- 
proved equivalent. Elective. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Naumann. (Ill or IV) 
(Not given 1940-41) 



Department of Home Economics 119 

325r. HOUSEHOLD BUYING. 

This course includes the study of the production, distribution, 
branding, labeling, advertising, legislation and standardization 
of household goods in relation to consumer buying. Two lectures 
each week. Prerequisite, Economics 325 (or parallel) or ap- 
proved equivalent. Elective. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Edwards. (Ill or IV) 

405r. CO-ORDINATING COURSE (FOR GENERAL HOME ECO- 
NOMICS MAJORS). HOME MANAGEMENT. 
Management problems of the homemaker in relation to all house- 
hold activities, income, labor, time utilization, and family rela- 
tionships. Application of the principles underlying manage- 
ment through residence in the Home Management House. Home 
Management House residence and group conferences. Credit, 
two semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mrs. Street, Miss 
Howell. (Ill) 

415r. HOUSEHOLD EQUIPMENT. 

The selection, operation, care and arrangement of household 
equipment in relation to income and efficiency in the use of time 
and labor. One lecture and one three-hour laboratory each week. 
Prerequisite, Physics SOlr or approved equivalent. Elective. 
Credit, two semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mrs. Street. 
(Ill or IV) 

435. ADVANCED HOME FURNISHING. 

In this course an intensive study is made of past and present 
house furnishings in relation to type and arrangement of house, 
income, and costs; selection, arrangement and adaptation of 
style and type of furniture and furnishings. One lecture and 
two three-hour laboratories each week. Selected field trips re- 
quired. Prerequisite, Home Economics 205. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Naumann. (Ill or 
IV) 
(Not given 1940-41) 

445. PROBLEMS IN FAMILY FINANCE. 

Earning and spending the family income to increase its ade- 
quacy and insure economic security; household budgeting and 
accounting; household credit; investments and control of prop- 
erty. Two lectures each week. Prerequisite, Home Economics 
325. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Street. (Ill or IV) 
(Not given 1940-41) 

455. CO-ORDINATING COURSE. PROBLEMS IN HOUSEHOLD 
ECONOMICS. 
This course will be conducted as a seminar and will include the 
discussion of present day housing in relation to the family — 
planning, furnishing, equipping, managing, and financing. Three 
lectures each week. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Street, 
Miss Nauman. (Ill or IV) 
(Not given 1940-41) 



120 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

HOME RELATIONSHIPS AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

302r. CHILD DEVELOPMENT. 

A general course in the physical, mental, and social develop- 
ment of the child. Two lectures each week and observation in 
the nursery school. Credit, three semester hours. Prerequisite, 
Psychology 221r or approved equivalent. Elective. Mrs. Rosa, 
Miss Forbes. (Ill) 

402. SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC PROBLEMS OF THE HOME. 

The principles of economics and sociology as applied to problems 
of present-day home and family living — money management, 
health, housing, recreation, legislation, and relationships. Two 
lectures each week. Prerequisites, Economics 325 and Sociology 
321 or approved equivalents. Credit, two semester hours. Elec- 
tive. Miss Edwards. (Ill or IV) 

412r. HOME RELATIONSHIPS. 

A study of the relationships of parents and children as they are 
affected by modern home and family life. Two lectures each 
week. Prerequisite (or parallel), Home Economics 302 and So- 
ciology 321 or approved equivalents. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Edwards. (Ill or IV) 

HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

307r. TEACHING METHODS IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

The aims and principles of education as applied to the field of 
home economics teaching; the organization and administration 
of home economics in the secondary school; an introduction to 
curriculum construction. Two lectures each week. Prerequisites, 
Psychology 222r and Education 350 (or parallel) or approved 
equivalents. Credit, two semester hours. Fee 50c. Miss Playfoot 
and others. (Ill) 

407r. CO-ORDINATING COURSE. HOME ECONOMICS EDUCA- 
TION SEMINAR. 
This course includes the discussion of the principles of teaching 
as observed and experienced in the classroom. The course will 
emphasize the analyses of student-teacher problems. Two lec- 
tures each week. Credit, two semester hours. Fee 50c. Miss 
Campbell and others. (Ill) 

417. PARENT EDUCATION METHODS. 

A study of the history and philosophy of parent education; a 
review of typical programs, methods, and materials for parents' 
study with practice in planning lessons and leading adult 
groups. Group conferences each week with observation and prac- 
tice to be arranged. Prerequisites, Home Economics 302 and 412 
(or parallel). Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Rosa. (Ill 
or IV) 

427r. SUPERVISED TEACHING IN NUTRITION. 

Experience in the teaching of nutrition, especially planned for 
those interested in hospital dietetics and school feeding. Prere- 
quisite, Home Economics 307 or approved equivalent. Credit, one 
semester hour. Miss Playfoot. (Ill) 



Department op Home Economics 121 

437. COORDINATING COURSE. NURSERY SCHOOL EDUCATION. 
A course in the theory and practice of nursery school educa- 
tion, including a study of equipping, organizing, and managing 
a nursery school with supervised observation, experiences, and 
teaching in the nursery school and with parent study groups. 
Group conferences each week and laboratory to be arranged in the 
nursery school. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Forbes. 
(Ill or IV) 

447. FOOD DEMONSTRATION TECHNIQUES. 

A laboratory course dealing with the techniques of food demon- 
stration. One lecture and one two-hour laboratory each week. 
Prerequisite, Home Economics 313. Credit, two semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $U.OO. Mrs. Edwards. (Ill or IV) 

467r. COORDINATING COURSE. SUPERVISED TEACHING IN 
HOME ECONOMICS. 
The application of the principles of teaching to situations as 
found in the secondary school with conferences, observations, 
and teaching under supervision. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Campbell, Miss Playfoot, Mrs. Bowers. (Ill) 

INSTITUTION ECONOMICS 

309. INSTITUTION FOOD STUDY. 

A study of the selection, preparation and service of food on the 
quantity basis. One lecture and two three-hour laboratories each 
week. Prerequisite, Home Economics 303, or by individual ap- 
proval. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
Elective. Miss Tansil. (Ill) 

419. INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT. 

The organization of administrative work in the food and house 
units of such institutions as schools, colleges, hospitals, com- 
mercial and industrial institutions; the study of the manage- 
ment of employees, materials, money, and time; the use of job 
analysis, work directions and records. Two lectures each week. 
Prerequisite, Home Economics 309 (or parallel). Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Tansil. (Ill) 

420. INSTITUTION BUYING. 

A study of institution foods and equipment. Emphasis is placed 
on buying procedure, specifications, costs and records; the prob- 
lems involved in food purchasing, storage and yield of various 
wholesale units; selection, installation and operation of equip- 
ment. Two lectures each week. Prerequisite, Home Economics 
U19. Credit, tvjo semester hours. Miss Tansil. (Ill) 

429. INSTITUTION EXPERIENCE. 

Practical work in the cafeteria in preparing and serving food 
and in keeping records. By the rotation of duties experience is 
gained in the various preparation units, in counter service and 
money management. Emphasis is placed on the study of each 
job and the achievement of high standards of work. Prerequi- 
sites, Home Economics 309 and U19 (or parallel). Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Tansil. (Ill) 



122 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

430. CO-ORDINATING COURSE. INSTITUTION ECONOMICS 
SEMINAR. 
The seminar discussions for this course will be organized around 
the practical experiences of the students in the various institu- 
tion centers, and will include all phases of institution manage- 
ment. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Tansil. (Ill) 

439. INSTITUTION HOUSE ADMINISTRATION. 

The furnishing and maintenance of institution house units such 
as educational institutions, clubs, hospitals, and hotels. The 
study of materials, records, and employee-training. This course 
prepares for positions as executive housekeepers, supervisors 
of residence halls and plant maintenance managers. Three lec- 
tures each week. Prerequisite (or parallel), Home Economics 
U20. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Tansil. (Ill) 
(Not given 1940-41) 



GENERAL COURSES 

lOOr. SURVEY COURSE IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

A survey study of basic principles of room furnishing, clothing 
selection and grooming, money management and buying tech- 
niques, social customs and etiquette, and relationships. The course 
will be presented in lecture, discussion, and demonstration form. 
No prerequisite. Elective to freshmen and sophomores, other 
than home economics majors. Credit, three semester hours. Fee, 
$2.00. Selected staff members. (I) 

300r. HOME AND FAMILY LIVING. 

This course will include the presentation and discussion of basic 
principles and topics relating to housing, feeding, management 
and relationships of the home and family, especially emphasiz- 
ing house planning, food needs of the family, meal planning, 
money expenditures and budgeting, and child care and train- 
ing. Three lectures each week. Elective to junior-senior stu- 
dents other than home economics majors. Credit, three semester 
hours. Selected staff members. (Ill) 

400r. SPECIAL PROBLEM IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

An individual problem to be selected by the student under guid- 
ance of the student adviser. The problem will be worked out 
under the supervision of an assigned staff member. Conference 
hours to be arranged. Credit 1-2 semester hours. (Ill) 

501r. SPECIAL PROBLEM IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

An individual problem to be selected by the student with the ap- 
proval of the head of the department. This problem is to be of 
pertinent interest to the home and of relation to the proposed 
thesis of the student. The problem will be worked out under the 
supervision of one or more staff members. Conference hours to 
be arranged. Credit, one to six semester hours. Assigned staff 
member. (IV) 

511r. THESIS SEMINAR. 

Reports of progress and discussion of theses and related prob- 
lems. No credit. (IV) 



Department of Home Economics 123 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

The degree of Master of Science in Home Economics is offered 
after the completion of prescribed courses in home economics 
and related fields. The prerequisites for the degree are a Bach- 
elor of Science degree in Home Economics as offered at this in- 
stitution or at an accredited institution offering an approved 
course in home economics, or a Bachelor's degree in an approved 
major field from an accredited institution. The requirements 
for the Master of Science degree are nine full courses, six of 
which shall constitute the major and three the minor. The 
thesis, which is required of all candidates for the degree of Master 
of Science, shall carry the equivalent value of one full course. 
Other requirements as outlined by the Graduate School of the 
University of North Carolina must be met. These requirements 
include a reading knowledge of a modern language; a written 
comprehensive examination in the major field; an oral examina- 
tion on the thesis; residence; and approved recommendation of 
the appointed advisory committee to the Graduate Council. 

LIBRARY 

101. LIBRARY INSTRUCTION. 

An elective course designed to equip students at the beginning of 
their college studies with a skill in finding printed material 
which should serve them not only during their college years but 
in all later pursuit of information. It also offers help with such 
necessary techniques as the making of bibliographies and the 
intelligent inspection of periodical literature. One hour, either 
semester. Credit, one semester hour. Miss Urban. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Professors Barton, Strong; Associate Professor Wat- 
KINS ; Instructor Grogan. 

The courses essential to the major, which is based on 101, 102, 
or 103, 104, are 205, 217, 218, 325, 327, 337, 450. The courses es- 
sential to the minor, which is based on 101 and 102, or 103, 104 
are 217 and 218. In each case, other courses are to be chosen to 
make up the required number of hours. 

Students who expect to major or minor in Mathematics are 
urged by the department to take Mathematics 101 and 102; 
those who take Mathematics as an elective, whether preparing 
for the sciences or not, are advised to take Mathematics 103 
and 104. 

101 and 102. ALGEBRA AND PLANE TRIGONOMETRY. 

Algebra, three hours, first semester. Plane Trigonometry, three 
hours, second semester. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Bar- 
ton. (I) 

103 and 104. ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS. 

An introductory course which treats of the graphical represen- 
tation of functions and the elements of Trigonometry, Analy- 
tic Geometry, and Calculus. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. Miss Barton, Miss Strong, Miss Watkins, 
Miss Grogan. (I) 



124 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

205. SOLID AND SPHERICAL GEOMETRY. 

Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Strong. (II) 

206. INTRODUCTION TO ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. 

This course is more elementary than Mathematics 217 and is 
designed as an alternative to Mathematics 102 or 104 for those 
students who have had Trigonometry in high school. Students 
should not elect both Mathematics 206 and 217. Three hours, 
second semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 101 or 103 and a 
course in Trigonometry. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Watkins. (I) 

217. ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. 

Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 101 and 
102, or 103 and 10 U> Credit, three semester hours. Miss Bar- 
ton. (II) 

218. INTRODUCTION TO THE CALCULUS. 

Three hours, second semester. Prerequiste, Mathematics 217 or 
206. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barton. (II) 

241. THEORY OF STATISTICS. 

An introductory course in statistical methods. Such topics as 
the collection and classification of data, graphical methods, fre- 
quency distribution, averages, correlation, index numbers, and 
time series will be treated. This course is designed especially 
for students in other departments who are interested in the 
fundamental principles of statistical methods and cannot be used 
to fulfill the science requirement for graduation. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Watkins. 
(ID 

320. COLLEGE GEOMETRY. 

This course includes a rapid review of high school geometry, 
followed by a brief study -of the modern geometry of the tri- 
angle and circle. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, 
Mathematics 101 and 102, or 103 and 10 U, and approval of in- 
structor. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Strong. (Ill) 

325. ADVANCED ALGEBRA AND THEORY OF EQUATIONS. 

Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 217 or 
206. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Strong. (Ill) 

327. DIFFERENTIAL AND INTEGRAL CALCULUS. 

Three hours, first semester. A continuation of Mathematics 
218. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barton. (Ill) 

328. ADVANCED ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. 

Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 218. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barton. (Ill) 

337. HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS. 

Two hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 217 or 
206. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Watkins. (Ill) 



: 



Department of Music 125 

430. ADVANCED CALCULUS. 

This course will extend the concepts developed in the elementary 
Calculus to functions of more than one variable. It will in- 
clude a study of partial derivatives, multiple integrals with 
their applications; also some elementary work in the solution 
of differential equations. Two hours, first semester. Prere- 
quisite, Mathematics 327 or its equivalent. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Barton. (Ill) 

432. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 

Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 327. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barton. (Ill) 

450". COORDINATING COURSE. 

Three hours, second semester. Required of all mathematics 
majors in the senior year. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Barton, Miss Strong. 

The following courses will be given whenever called for: 

324. HIGHER PLANE CURVES. 

Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 327, 
328. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barton. (Ill) 

431. PROJECTIVE GEOMETRY. 

Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Mathematics 328. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Strong. (Ill) 

433 and 434. MODERN ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. 

Two hours for the year. Prerequisite, Mathematics 327, 328. 
Credit, four semester hours. Miss Barton. (Ill) 

ASTRONOMY 

312. DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY. 

The practical work includes constellation study, exercises with 
the celestial globe, and elementary observation with field glass 
and small telescope. This course may be used toward a major 
or minor in Mathematics. Two recitations and one two-hour 
period for laboratory and observational work, second semester. 
Prerequisites, Mathematics 101 and 102 or 103 and 104. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Strong. (Ill) 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Professors Altvater, Thompson; Associate Professors 
Minor, Ferrell, More, Hannas ; Assistant Professors 
Oncley, Holloway ; Instructors Clement, Henry, A. 
Oncley, Dickieson, Stephens. 

COURSES IN APPLIED MUSIC 

"Applied Music" refers to the practical study of piano, organ, 
voice, violin, or orchestral instruments, in private individual 
lessons. See School of Music for entrance requirements and 
classifications of those who elect formal courses in music. Pri- 



126 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

vate lessons in applied music are available to students from 
other departments whose courses of study admit of such extra 
work. 

For Freshmen: 

101-102. PIANO, ORGAN, VIOLIN, VIOLONCELLO. COURSE A. 
PIANO, COURSE C. 

103-104. VOICE. COURSE B. 

107-108. MAJOR ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENT. COURSE D. 

109-110. APPLIED MUSIC. A.B. COURSE. 

113-114. PIANO. COURSE B. 

117-118. PIANO. COURSE D. 

121-122. INCIDENTAL INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC IN ALL 
COURSES. 

For Sophomores: 

201-202. PIANO, ORGAN, VIOLIN, VIOLONCELLO. COURSE A. 

203-204. VOICE. COURSE B. 

207-208. MAJOR ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENT. COURSE D. 

209-210. APPLIED MUSIC. A.B. COURSE. 

213-214. PIANO. COURSE B. 

217-218. PIANO. COURSE D. 

221-222. INCIDENTAL INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC IN ALL 
COURSES. 

For Juniors: 

301-302. PIANO, ORGAN, VIOLIN, VIOLONCELLO. COURSE A. 

303-304. VOICE. COURSE B. 

305-306. VOICE. COURSE C. 

307-308. MAJOR ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENT. COURSE D. 

309-310. APPLIED MUSIC. A.B. COURSE. 

317-318. MINOR ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENT. COURSE D. 

321-322. INCIDENTAL INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC IN ALL 
COURSES. 

335. ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS: WOODWIND AND 
BRASS. REQUIRED IN COURSES C AND D. 

336. VIOLIN, VIOLA, CELLO, BASS. 



Department of Music 127 

For Seniors: 

401-402. PIANO, ORGAN, VIOLIN, VIOLONCELLO. COURSE A. 

403-404. VOICE. COURSE B. 

405-406. VOICE. COURSE C. 

407-408. MAJOR ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENT. COURSE D. 

409-410. APPLIED MUSIC. A.B. COURSE. 

417-418. MINOR APPLIED MUSIC. COURSE D. 

421-422. INCIDENTAL INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC IN ALL 
COURSES. 

475. VIOLIN. COURSE C. 

COURSES IN MUSICAL THEORY AND MUSIC EDUCATION 

100. COLLEGE CHOIR. 

Membership in the choir is open to all students having a voice 
of fair effectiveness, a correct ear, and some knowledge of 
musical notation. Two rehearsals each week. Credit, one semes- 
ter hour for the year's work. Mr. Thompson. 

101 and 102. HARMONY AND KEYBOARD HARMONY. 

This course deals with the individuality and unity of melody, 
harmony, and rhythm as elements of musical expression. It 
aims to develop the ability to recognize, in aural analysis, all 
the diatonic harmonies in both major and minor modes, and 
to employ them in harmonization of both given and original 
melodies. Emphasis is placed upon the conscious musical fact 
rather than upon the written symbols; hence much original 
work is required. Three hours for the year. Required of fresh- 
men in the School of Music. Elective for students in Bachelor of 
Arts Course. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Hannas. (I) 

111 and 112. SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING. 

This course gives systematic training in the fundamentals of 
music theory, sight singing and ear training, stressing the ele- 
mentary problems in pitch and rhythm. Individual work is re- 
quired in both sight singing and ear training. Two hours for the 
year. Required of freshmen in School of Music. Credit, four\ 
semester hours. Miss Holloway. (I) 

127r. MUSIC APPRECIATION. 

This course is planned to help the non-music student to listen 
intelligently to music. No technical knowledge of music is 
required for entrance. The instruments of the symphony or- 
chestra, the various forms of musical composition and the stand- 
ard symphonic literature are studied. Three hours either se- 
mester. Elective in Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science 
courses (except Bachelor of Science in Music) for Freshmen and 
Sophomores. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Thompson. (I) 



128 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

150. COLLEGE ORCHESTRA. 

Qualified players of orchestral instruments are admitted to 
membership following try-outs by the conductor. Two rehears- 
als each week. Credit, one semester hour for the year's work* 
Mr. Altvater. 

200. ENSEMBLE PLAYING. 

Participation in performance of chamber music. Elective for 
qualified players on permission of dean. Two meetings each 
week. One hour for the year. Credit, two semester hours for 
the year's work. Staff. 

201 and 202. ADVANCED HARMONY AND KEYBOARD HAR- 
MONY. 

Application of the principles outlined in Music 101-102, to the 
study of altered chords, chromatic harmonies, remote and en- 
harmonic modulations. Analysis of Bach Chorales and Grieg 
Op. 66, etc., as a basis for the study of the principles of musical 
form and harmonic analysis. Practice in original composi- 
tion. Three hours for the year. Required of sophomores in the 
School of Music. Elective for students in the Bachelor of Arts 
Course. Prerequisite, Music 101-102. Credit, six semester hours. 
Miss Hannas. (II) 

211 and 212. SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING. 

This course gives more extensive trainng in sight singing and 
ear training, studying more difficult problems, including two- 
and three-part material. One hour for the year. Required of 
all sophomores in School of Music. Prerequisite, Music 111-112. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Holloway. (II) 

231. HISTORY AND APPRECIATION OF MUSIC. 

A general survey of music history before the Christian era. A 
more detailed study of the music and of music history from the 
beginning of the Christian era to the culmination of the poly- 
phonic school as represented in the monumental works of J. S. 
Bach. Through the records and scores of the Carnegie Music 
Library much of the great music of all periods is available for 
illustration and study. Three hours, first semester. Required 
of sophomores in School of Music. Elective for students in 
Bachelor of Arts Course. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Thompson. (Ill) 

232. MUSIC HISTORY AND APPRECIATION. 

A study of the musical development from 1750 to the present 
time — a knowledge of the history and an intimate acquaintance 
with important works of each of the great classic and romantic 
composers is required. Three hours, second semester. Required 
of sophomores in School of Music. Elective for students in> 
Bachelor of Arts Course. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Thompson. (II) 

250. ENSEMBLE SINGING. 

Participation in choral singing of advanced nature for smaller 
groups. Study of motets, madrigals and other chamber forms. 
Limited to voice students. May be elected only by permission 
of head of department. Two meetings each week. Credit, two 
semester hours for the year. Mr. Oncley. 



Department of Music 129 

300. MUSIC FORM AND STRUCTURE. 

A survey of the structure and form of music as related especially 
to the dance. Designed especially as an elective for majors in 
Education and in Physical Education. Two hours weekly, second 
semester. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Thompson. (Ill) 

301 and 302. COUNTERPOINT. 

Application of the principles of single and reversible counter- 
point, to two or more melodies in combination. Study of the va- 
rious forms of polyphonic composition, with emphasis on 16th, 
18th, and 20th century idioms. Two hours for the year. Re- 
quired of all juniors in School of Music. Prerequiste, Music 201- 
202. Credit, four semester hours. Miss Hannas. (Ill) 

311 and 312. SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING. 

This course lays emphasis on the reading of part work suitable 
for glee clubs and chorus work in grammar grades and high 
school. Special attention is given to harmonic dictation as it 
bears on the problem of chorus singing. One hour for the year. 
Required of juniors mnjoring in Music Education or in Voice. 
Prerequisites, Music 111-112, 211-212. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Holloway. (Ill) 

315 and 316. PUBLIC SCHOOL METHODS. 

A study of the values and aims of music in the elementary school, 
the subject matter used, and the best methods of presenting the 
various problems encountered in rote and sight singing. Model 
lessons by the instructor, lesson planning, observation in the 
Training School, and teaching of the class by its members are 
used as means of guining teaching skill. Two hours for the year. 
Required of juniors in Music Education. Open to juniors and 
seniors majoring in Applied Music. Prerequisites, Music 101- 
102, 111-112. Credit, four semester hours. Miss More. (Ill) 

323 and 324. CHOIR CONDUCTING. 

This course deals with the organization and training of church 
choirs, the technique of conducting and playing the organ at 
the same time, and a study of various liturgies. It presents a 
survey of the best material available for the average quartet or 
chorus choir. Two hours for the year. Required of all students 
majoring in Organ. Junior and senior elective for students hav- 
ing had one year of Organ. Credit, four semester hours. Mr. 
Thompson. (Ill) 

325 and 326. VOICE TECHNIC. 

Special attention given to voice building, careful study of dic- 
tion. One hour for the year. Required of juniors in Music Edu- 
cation. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Oncley. (Ill) 

327. MUSIC APPRECIATION. 

The course in Music Appreciation will be adapted to the needs 
of the general college student who wishes to obtain a better 
understanding of music as an element of liberal culture and to 
develop the power of listening intelligently. No technical knowl- 
edge is required for entrance. The following subjects will be 
studied: the orchestra and orchestral instruments; the mate- 
rials of music; the fundamental musical forms as illustrated in 



130 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

the standard orchestral literature. Three hours, either semester. 
Elective in Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science courses 
(except Bachelor of Science in Music). Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Thompson. (Ill) 

328. THE MUSIC DRAMAS OF RICHARD WAGNER. 

A study of the operas of Richard Wagner, beginning with the 
early operas, "Lohengrin" and "Tannhauser", continuing with 
an intensive study of the Nibelungen Ring Cycle, ("Das Rhein- 
gold", "Die Walkuere", "Siegfried", and "Die Gotterdammer- 
ung"), and culminating with "Tristan and Isolde" and "Parsi- 
fal". The recordings and scores of the Carnegie Music Library 
will be used in this course, which will be largely adapted to the 
broadcasts from the Metropolitan Opera House. A brief survey 
of the history of opera from its beginning in 1600 to the time 
of Wagner, will precede the study of the Wagnerian operas. 
Three hours, second semester. Elective open to Juniors, Seniors, 
and Sophomores by approval of the instructor. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Mr. Thompson. (Ill) 

335. ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS— WOODWIND AND BRASS. 

Class study of wind instruments, both wood and brass. Each 
student is given opportunity to gain a practical knowledge of 
several instruments — a knowledge which will be useful to a 
student who expects to direct school orchestras. Two hours, first 
semester. Required of juniors in Music Education. Credit, two 
semester hours. Mr. Henry. (Ill) 

336. ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS — VIOLIN, VIOLA, 'CELLO, 

BASS. 
Class instruction. The object of this course is to give the stu- 
dent a working knowledge of the stringed instruments. It aims 
also to prepare her to organize and conduct ensemble classes. 
Required of juniors in Music Education. Two hours, second se- 
mester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Henry. (Ill) 

338. COMMUNITY MUSIC. 

A study of various phases of the subject, including the function 
and values of music in typical community situations and for typi- 
cal community needs: in industrial and commercial organiza- 
tions, in settlement houses and other character-building agen- 
cies, and in hospitals and institutions of correction, especially 
considering the socializing, emotional and therapeutic values of 
music; and of activities and organizations to meet these needs. 
Practical methods of organizing musical activities for recrea- 
tional use will be considered, and materials for all types of com- 
munity musical activities examined and evaluated. Training in 
directing community singing will be given. Two hours, second 
semester. Elective for Juniors and Seniors in any department 
with the approval of the instructor of the course and the student's 
major adviser. Credit, two semester hours. Miss More. (Ill) 

340. PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 

The essentials of school music problems and materials in the 
intermediate and upper grades. Three hours, second semester. 
Elective for Bachelor of Arts students who have not taken Music 
3bl. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Holloway. (Ill) 



Department of Music 131 

341. PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 

Fundamentals of music theory and sight reading necessary for 
primary grade teachers — study of the child voice, rote songs, 
problems and materials of music in grades one to three. Three 
hours, first semester. Elective for Bachelor of Arts students. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Holloway. (Ill) 

342. PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 

Fundamentals of music theory and sight reading necessary for 
intermediate and upper grade teachers — study of problems and 
music materials in grades four to six. Three hours, second se- 
mester. Elective for Bachelor of Arts students. Prerequisite, 
Music 3^1. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Holloway. (Ill) 

343 and 344. VOICE TEACHING METHODS. 

Classification of teaching material. The study of phonetics as 
applied to the singing voice. Special attention to breathing, tone 
production, tone quality, and diction. Observation and practice 
teaching required. Three hours for the year. Elective for se- 
niors majoring in Voice. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Oncley. 
(Ill) 

*345 and 346. PIANO TEACHING METHODS. 

Classification of fundamental teaching material and best meth- 
ods of presentation to the child mind. Notation, sight reading, 
ear training, rhythm, technique, melody writing, and musical 
games. Observation of children's classes. Three hours for the 
year. Open to juniors in School of Music majoring in Piano. 
Prerequisite, Piano 201-202. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
Clement. (Ill) 

355 and 356. FORM AND ANALYSIS. 

Analysis of musical structure in primary, composite, and large 
forms. Constructive work. Two hours for the year. Prere- 
quisite, Music 101-102, 201-202. Credit, four semester hours. Mr. 
Henry. (Ill) 

357 and 358. VIOLIN TEACHING METHODS. 

Classification of material and methods of presentation. Ability 
to teach both class groups and individual pupils through ob- 
servation and practical experience. Three hours for the year. 
Open to juniors majoring in Violin. Credit, six semester hours. 
Mr. Dickieson. (Ill) 

401 and 402. COORDINATING COURSE— COMPOSITION. 

Required of seniors majoring in Applied Music, except voice, and 
of all A.B. music majors. Practice in modern composition. Four 
semester hours for the year. Miss Hannas. (Ill) 

415. MUSIC APPRECIATION METHODS. 

A study of the educational values and aims of music apprecia- 
tion in the schools and the best methods and subject matter for 
accomplishing those aims. Model lessons to the class, observa- 
tion, and practice teaching in the Training School will furnish 
practical application of the methods studied. Two hours, first 

* Note : Courses 345-346 and 461-462, having been elected at the beginning 
of the college year, must be pursued through both semesters before credit toward 
the degree is allowed for either. 



132 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

semester. Required of seniors in Music Education. Open to all 
seniors in the School of Music. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
More. (Ill) 

416. SELECTION AND USE OF MATERIALS. 

A study of the various sorts of music materials suited to the 
development of the pupil from childhood to maturity, including 
several of the most used series of school music texts, materials 
for many sorts of programs, and for the various musical organ- 
izations of the school and community. Two hours, second semes- 
ter. Required of seniors in Music Education. Open to all seniors 
in the School of Music. Credit, two semester hours. Miss More. 
(Ill) 

425 and 426. VOICE TECHNIC. 

Continuation of Music 325-326. Required of seniors in Music 
Education. One hour for the year. Credit, two semester hours. 
Mr. Oncley. (Ill) 

431 and 432. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 

A study of the larger forms of musical composition. Designed 
for students who give evidence of marked creative ability. Two 
hours for the year. Elective for students who have taken Music 
4.01-402 or its equivalent. Credit, four semester hours. Miss 
Hannas. (Ill) 

435. CONDUCTING. 

This course will teach the technique of the baton, the essential 
qualities of successful conducting, the fundamentals of choral 
and orchestral interpretation and will give practice in conduct- 
ing, followed by detailed criticism by the class and by the in- 
structor. Two hours, first semester. Required of seniors in 
Music Education. Elective for other seniors in the School of 
Music. Credit, two semester hours. Miss More. (Ill) 

445 and 446. HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC METHODS. 

A study of music work in junior and senior high schools, in- 
cluding the course of study, classes in theory, history, and ap- 
preciation; credit for outside study; extracurricular activities 
and public performances; and the relation of the supervisor to 
the community and to the various members of the school organ- 
ization. Two hours for the year. Required of seniors in Music 
Education. Open to all seniors in the School of Music. Prere- 
quisite, Music 315-816. Credit, four semester hours. Miss More. 
(HI) 

455 and 456. INSTRUMENTATION. 

Individual characteristics of orchestra instruments; building of 
the orchestral score. One hour for the year. Prerequisites, Music 
101, 102, 201, 202. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Henry. (Ill) 

*461 and 462. PRACTICE PIANO TEACHING. 

Practice of the principles learned in the methods course by the 
teaching of children under the supervision and direction of the 
instructor of Piano Teaching Methods. Observation of chil- 
dren's classes. Three hours for the year. Open to seniors in the 

* Note : Courses 345-346 and 461-462, having been elected at the beginning: 
of the college year, must be pursued through both semesters before credit toward 
the degree is allowed for either. 



Department of Philosophy 133 

School of Music majoring in Piano. Prerequisites, Music 345- 
346, Piano 301, 302. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Clement 
(III) 
465 and 466. SUPERVISED TEACHING. 

The daily teaching in various grades of the Training School is 
prepared for and supplemented by frequent conferences with 
supervisors for constructive criticism and planning of new work. 
Three hours for the year. Required of all seniors in Music Edu- 
cation. Prerequisite, Music 315-316. Credit, six semester hours. 
Miss More, Miss Holloway. (Ill) 

467 and 468. PRACTICE VIOLIN TEACHING. 

Application of the problems involved in Music 357-358, through 
the teaching of children, under the direct supervision of the Violin 
Department. Orchestra organization and routine, through active 
membership in the college orchestra. Three hours for the year. 
Elective for seniors in Violin Department. Credit, six semester 
hours. Mr. Dickieson. (Ill) 

469 and 470. PRACTICE VOICE TEACHING. 

Application in actual teaching of the methods set forth in Music 
343-344, under supervision of the Voice Department. Three hours 
for the year. Elective for seniors in the Voice Department. 
Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Oncley. (Ill) 

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Associate Professor Clark. 

101r. A PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE FOR TODAY. 

A freshman orientation course. A survey of human values in the 
modern world, and of what the various opportunities which a col- 
lege has to offer may contribute to the understanding and ap- 
preciation of such values. An introduction to the question as to 
what, essentially, a human person is, and of the place and value 
of the human individual in the ultimate scheme or order of the 
universe. Three hours, each semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. (I) 

315. SCIENCE AND RELIGION. 

A comparative study of the scientific and the religious approaches 
to human thought and experience. A discussion of the points at 
which a conflict between science and religion is felt today. A sur- 
vey of what some of the most competent thinkers on these topics 
have had to say about them, with a view to the development of 
more adequate methods of reflective thinking in such matters. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 

321. ETHICS. 

A study of ethical standards, and of principles for the evaluation 
of human life generally. An application of these principles to 
some controversial problems in personality and character develop- 
ment, and to questions of value connected with marriage and the 
family, contemporary political issues, the problems of our indus- 
trial order, the social significance of the fine arts, the purposes 
of education. An introduction to the question of the relationship 
between ethics and religion. Open to sophomores, with consent 



134 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

of instructor, and to juniors and seniors. Three hours, first se- 
mester. Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 

322. AESTHETICS. 

A study of the meaning of beauty, and of some of the great philo- 
sophies of aesthetics. The relationship between beauty and the 
fine and practical arts. The role of aesthetic values among other 
human values. The relationship between truth and beauty. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 

323. LOGIC. 

A study in the principles of systematic and objective thinking. 
Practice in the detection of common fallacies. An introduction 
to the forms of valid deductive and inductive reasoning and to 
the role of logic in the sciences, mathematical, physical, and social. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 

326. THE PRESENT CONFLICT OF SOCIAL PHILOSOPHIES. 

The trends in philosophical thinking behind the present world 
conflict. A comparative study of the philosophies of Fascism, 
Communism, and of "a democratic way of life" conceived as de- 
pendent upon the rule of the general will of the people. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 

331. PHILOSOPHICAL AND SCIENTIFIC ASPECTS OF MODERN 
HISTORY. 

The effects of science, and scientific philosophy, upon modern his- 
tory and on recent cultural developments in the western world. 
This course is designed to complement courses in European his- 
tory, and credit earned in it will be accepted for a major or a 
minor in History. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. (Ill) 

347. CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY. 

Studies of some of the most influential movement in philosophical 
thinking today, and, in particular, of various philosophical re- 
actions to the theory of evolution. Readings in the works of out- 
standing living philosophers. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 

349. HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY. 

Attention will be centered on a few of the great ancient philoso- 
phical founders of the European tradition of thought and culture. 
Heraclitus, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Plotinus, St. 
Anselm. The thought of each of these men will be studied in the 
light of the social environment from which it grew, the life and 
personality of the philosopher, and the effect it has had upon the 
subsequent development of European philosophy, art, literature, 
science, and social and political theory. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. (Ill) 

350. HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY. 

The method of study in this course will be similar to that in 
Philosophy 349. The thinkers emphasized will be: Descartes, 
Hobbes, Spinoze, Locke, Berkley, Hume, Rousseau, Kant, Schopen- 
hauer, Whitehead. Credit earned will be accepted for a major or 
minor in History, unless the student has already received history 
credit in Philosophy 331. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. (Ill) 



Department of Physical Education 135 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Professor Coleman ; Assistant Professors Martus, *Tis- 
dale, White, Davis; Instructors *Vail, Thompson, 
Pakk, Shelden, Brownlee, Hoye. 

101. physical education for freshmen. 

Physical Education assignments for new students are based: (1) 
on their previous training and experience in Physical Education 
as noted on a questionnaire filled out by new students during 
Freshman Week; (2) on the record of their physical and medical 
examinations. According to these findings, students are scheduled 
in Body Mechanics, Rhythms, Recreational Sports, Tennis, etc. 
Those students showing satisfactory skills and experience are 
allowed free election in the Physical Education program. Motor 
skills tests are given to check on these placements. During the 
winter season special attention is given to training in posture 
through class activities and discussions. Two hours for the year. 
Required of all freshmen. Miss Davis, Miss Hoye, Miss Shelden, 
Miss Thompson, Miss Brownlee, Miss White. 

102. PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR FRESHMEN. 

Students who have satisfactorily completed the work of the first 
semester may elect swimming, archery, tennis, baseball, folk 
dancing, tap dancing, American country dancing, modern dance, 
gymnastics, recreational sports, golf or riding. Students 
needing further work on Body Mechanics are assigned to this 
group. Miss Davis, Miss Hoye, Miss Shelden, Miss Thompson, 
Miss Brownlee, Miss White. 

103 and 104. BODY MECHANICS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL. 

Substituted for regular class work on the advice of the college 
physician and the physical director. Students carry on under 
supervision individual exercise programs based on their par- 
ticular needs. Two hours for the year. Miss Shelden. 

105 and 106. MODIFIED ACTIVITIES. 

This course is planned to meet the needs of those students whose 
activities are restricted and includes folk dancing, recreational 
sports and volleyball. Two hours for the year. Miss Thompson. 

107. PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR COMMERCIAL STUDENTS. 

Choice of one of the following activities: swimming, tap danc- 
ing, recreational sports. Two hours for one semester. Required 
of all commercial students. Miss Davis, Miss Hoye, Miss Thomp- 
son. 

109. HORSEBACK RIDING. 

Open to students after the first semester of the Freshman year. 
Special arrangements are made with accredited Riding Academies 
who offer for $15.00 a series of fifteen lessons, including trans- 
portation; this is accepted as one semester in Physical Education. 
Not more than two semesters may be presented for credit. 

110. HORSEBACK RIDING. ADVANCED COURSE. 






136 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

201 and 202. PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR SOPHOMORES. 

In the first semester a student may choose one of the following: 
archery, field hockey, swimming, modern dance, tap dancing, 
tennis, golf, folk dancing. In the second semester: archery, 
swimming, and diving, tennis, tap dancing, modern dance, re- 
creational sports, badminton, baseball, are offered. Two hours 
for the year. Required of all Sophomores. Miss Davis, Miss Hoye, 
Miss Brownlee, Miss Thompson, Miss White. 

203. GOLF. 

Golf may be elected by students after the first semester of the 
Freshman year. No more than two semesters may be presented 
for credit. Special arrangements are made with local Golf Clubs 
for students desiring instruction in Golf. Fifteen lessons are ac- 
cepted as the equivalent of one semester's work. A special rate 
of $15.00 for the semester includes instruction, transportation, 
greens fee, caddies and the use of clubs. 

204. GOLF. ADVANCED COURSE. 

Electives 

Open only to students who have completed the two-year require- 
ment in Physical Education. 

225. ADVANCED MODERN DANCE. 

Open only to students who have completed two semesters of the 
Modern Dance or who can present the necessary skill. Two hours, 
first semester. Credit, one semester hour. Miss Brownlee, (II) 

228. FOLK AND NATIONAL DANCING. 

Open only to students who have had one semester of dancing, 
or who can present the requisite skill. A study will be made of 
the music, the costumes, and the technique of national dance forms, 
with special emphasis on English and American country dances, 
as coordinated by Cecil Sharp. Two hours, second semester. 
Credit, one semester hour. Miss White, Miss Brownlee. (II) 

229. LIFE SAVING AND WATERFRONT SUPERVISION. 

Open only to students who can present the requisite skill in 
swimming. Designed for students interested in camp counselor- 
ships and summer recreation programs. Two hours, second se- 
mester. Credit, one semester hour. Miss Shelden. (II) 

231. PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

Methods, material, and organization of the Physical Education 
curriculum for Grades I to VI. Required by the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction for Elementary Teachers' Certificate. 
Two hours, each semester. Credit, one semester hours. Miss Cole- 
man. (II) 

232. COMMUNITY RECREATION. 

A study of the organization and administration of programs in 
community recreation. Observation of the Greensboro play- 
grounds, and practice in the organization and leadership of so- 
cial games and community festivals. It is advised but not re- 
quired that Physical Education 231 be taken before Physical 
Education 232. Two hours, second semester. Credit, one semes- 
ter hour. Miss Coleman. (II) 






Department of Physical Education 137 

233. ATHLETICS FOR HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS. 

Open only to students who can present a playing knowledge of 
basketball. The course is designed to assist prospective high 
school teachers in the administration of the athletic program 
for girls. Coaching and organization of basketball, field ball, 
and volley ball; lead-up games for basketball; organization and 
direction of the athletic association for high school girls. Two 
hours, first semester. Credit, one semester hour. Miss White. 
(ID 

CAMP LEADERSHIP 

Lectures, discussions, observations and required readings on camp 
programs, camp organization and administration, and the place 
of camping in the educational program. Open to Juniors and 
Seniors who can present adequate skills and interests in such 
camp activities as music, crafts, dramatics, sports, etc. One hour, 
second semester. Credit, one semester hour. Miss Thompson. 
(HI) 

235. ATHLETICS FOR HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS. 

A continuation of Physical Education 233, taking up the coach- 
ing of baseball, softball, badminton, and games of a recreational 
type. Organization of field days, sports days, and play days 
for high school girls. Two hours, second semester. Credit, one 
semester hour. Miss Thompson, Miss White. (II) 

TEACHER-TRAINING COURSES FOR MAJOR STUDENTS 

The technical courses in Physical Education are based on the 
study of education and of biology. Courses in language, history, 
and other academic subjects are required in order to secure 
the cultural background essential to women who hope to hold 
positions in this field of education. 

For entrance requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree 
in Physical Education see page 66. 

No student will be permitted to enter upon or to continue the 
work of the course when in the judgment of the College Physi- 
cian her physical condition renders it inadvisable. 
Students entering with advance credits from other colleges are 
asked to arrange a conference with the Director of Physical 
Education before registering for the major course in Physical 
Education. 

For the requirements for graduation with B.S. in Physical 
Education, see page 79. 

Professional Courses 

111 and 112. 

Practice in the following activities: field hockey, soccer, swim- 
ming, gymnastics, stunts, folk and tap dancing, track, baseball. 
Required of freshmen in Bachelor of Science in Physical Edu- 
cation in place of 101 and 102. Miss Davis, Miss Martus, Miss 
Shelden, Miss Thompson, Miss Brownlee, Miss White. 

211 and 212. 

Practice in the following activities: field hockey, soccer, field- 
ball, speedball, volleyball, tap and social dancing, swimming, 



138 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

basketball, modern dance, archery, recreational sports. Re- 
quired of Sophomores in Bachelor of Science in Physical Edu- 
cation in place of 201 and 202. Miss Davis, Miss Thompson, Miss 
Brownlee, Miss White. 

241. PLAYGROUND ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. 

The construction and equipment of school and community play- 
grounds, scout organization and leadership; techniques of teach- 
ing playground games, led-up games to team sports, stunts, and 
relays. Three hours, first semester. Required of Sophomores in 
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education Course. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Coleman, Miss Davis. 

351. PRINCIPLES AND METHODS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

Integration of principles in general education and Physical Edu- 
cation. Survey of aims and objectives of Physical Education, 
general methods in Education and their application to the teach- 
ing of Physical Education. Two lecture and three laboratory 
hours, first semester. Required of Juniors. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Martus. 

352. THE CURRICULUM IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

Construction of modern programs in Physical Education. Study 
of state and city programs. Introduction to tests and measure- 
ments with survey of standard tests of motor ability and achieve- 
ments. Two hours, second semester. Required of Juniors. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Martus. 

359 and 360. TECHNIQUES AND TEACHING METHODS IN 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES. 

Folk dancing, tennis, marching, gymnastics, apparatus, modern 
dance, child rhythms, singing games, story plays, basketball, 
field hockey, soccer, baseball, archery. This course also pro- 
vides opportunity for officiating in team and individual sports 
and includes suggested procedures for the organization of field 
days, sports days and play days. Required of Juniors. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Davis, Miss Martus, Miss Shelden, Miss 
Thompson, Miss Brownlee, Miss White. 

375 KINESIOLOGY. 

This course deals with the human bones, joints, and muscles 
concerned with physical exercises; the mechanical conditions 
under which these work; the manner in which they enter into 
the coordinate movements of life and of gymnastics and sports. 
Special emphasis is laid on the application of these principles 
to the solution of problems of posture and deformities. Three 
hours, second semester. Required of juniors. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Shelden. 

461 and 462. DIRECTED TEACHING. 

Technique of teaching Physical Education under Supervision. 
Regular observation in all departments of the Training School. 
Required of seniors. Credit, four semester hours. Miss Martus. 

463 and 464. ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. 

The first semester is given to a study of the history and litera- 
ture of Physical Education. In the second semester the class 
studies plans and equipment for modern gymnasia and athletic 
fields, and organizes courses in Physical Education for high 



Department of Physical Education 139 

schools and colleges. The methods of supervision in the ele- 
mentary schools are included. The group also takes up the co- 
ordination of departments of health and of recreation with 
Physical Education. Two hours, for the year. Required of se- 
niors. Credit, four semester hours. Miss Coleman. 

465 and 466. BODY MECHANICS. 

Lectures and clinical practice in exercise for the individual with 
special reference to correction of spine and foot deformities. 
Two hours for the year. Required of seniors in Bachelor of 
Science in Physical Education Course. Credit, four semester 
hours. Miss Shelden. 

467. HEALTH EDUCATION. 

A study of aims, methods, and materials for health teaching in 
the elementary and secondary schools. Two hours, first semester. 
Required of seniors. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Carlsson. 

468. TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

An introduction to tests and measurements in physical education 
with emphasis on the practical application to the program in the 
elementary and high school. Two hours, second semester. Required 
of seniors in Physical Education Course. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Shelden. 

469 and 470. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES AND TEACHING METH- 
ODS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 
Swimming, modern dance, life saving, folk dancing, canoeing, 
This course includes assisting in college classes in Physical Edu- 
cation and officiating in Physical Education activities of the 
college and community; the planning and production of festi- 
vals and pageants and a survey of the problems and organiza- 
tion of summer camps. Required of seniors. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Miss Coleman, Miss Davis, Miss Thompson, Miss 
Brownlee, Miss White. 

GYMNASIUM COSTUME 

Every student in the regular college courses must provide her- 
self with a regulation gymnasium outfit as follows: 

Two washable suits ($2.25 each) $4.50 

One official jersey 1.00 

Regulation shoes 2.50 

Two pairs ribbed hose (at $.50) 1.00 



$9.00' 



Students in the Commercial courses are not required to pur- 
chase jersey. 

This equipment must be secured after coming to college from 
dealers who handle the uniform adopted and required by the 
Physical Education Department. 

No swimming suit except a regulation cotton suit may be worn 
in the swimming pool. This suit must be secured through the 
Department of Physical Education, and is laundered by the Col- 
lege after each swimming period. The cost of this suit is about 
$1.25. Students using the pool must also have rubber bathing 
shoes (cost $.50). 



* Maximum cost. 



140 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS* 

Professor Warfield; Assistant Professor Tiedeman; 
Assistant Gill. 

PHYSICS LABORATORIES — The physics department occupies the ma- 
jor portion of the first floor of the new Science Building. There is 
a large general laboratory and three smaller special purpose lab- 
oratories: one for mechanics, heat, and sound experiments, one 
for experiments in magnetism, electricity, and modern physics, 
and another for experiments in the realm of light. In addition 
there are a suite of rooms embracing a studio and several dark 
rooms for photography, and another suite of rooms for all types 
of X-ray work. Three lecture rooms of various sizes are well 
equipped for demonstration lectures in Physics. A shaft from the 
roof terminates in the largest lecture room, and will be provided 
with a Foucault pendulum and with a heliostat for directing a 
beam of sunlight on to the lecture table at any hour of the day. 
A preparation room, stock room, shop, storage battery room, 
motor-generator and pump rooms, and offices complete the list of 
rooms on the first floor used by the Physics Department. A room 
on the fourth floor is available for experiments requiring sun 
light, and a small observatory on the roof is available for astro- 
nomical and meterological observations. Each laboratory and two 
of the lecture tables will be provided with gas, compressed air 
and partial vacuum lines, and with electrical outlets for alter- 
nating current of 60 cycles and of audio frequencies, and of direct 
current from storage batteries and motor-generator sets. A timing 
circuit is also provided for each laboratory. The mechanics lab- 
oratory also contains a vibration-proof table-topped pillar. 

101 and 102. GENERAL PHYSICS. 

Students taking this course will be divided into two groups; 
those who take it as an elective with no expectation of doing 
advanced work in science will be given material broader in 
scope and less technical in treatment than that given other stu- 
dents. Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 per se- 
mester. Mr. Warfield, Mr. Tiedeman, Miss Gill. (I) 

205 and 206. GENERAL PHYSICS. 

A general course on the mechanics of solids, liquids, and gases, 
and on heat, the first semester; and on electricity, sound, and 
light the second semester. Three lecture hours and one three- 
hour laboratory for the year. Prerequisite, Mathematics 103 and 
104. Credit, eight semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 per se- 
mester. Mr. Warfield, Mr. Tiedeman, Miss Gill. (II) 

207 and 208. GENERAL PHYSICS. 

The combined contents of this course with Physics 101 and 102 
are equivalent to Physics 205-206. One lecture hour for the year. 
Prerequisites or Corequisites, Physics 101 and 102. Credit, two 
semester hours. Mr. Tiedeman. (II) 



* Students who plan to major in Physics are advised to take Mathematics 
103-104 in the Freshman year and Physics 205-206 in the Sophomore year. Since 
Physics 205-206 is a Grade II course, it can be counted toward the major. The 
courses essential to the major are Physics 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, and 326. 



Department of Physics 141 

209r. PHOTOGRAPHY. 

A course designed to teach the student the principles of physics 
involved in photography. The course will serve as a foundation 
for the pursuit of photography as a hobby, or for its use as a 
clinical or research tool or in the preparation of teaching or lec- 
ture material. The student must purchase her own films and 
papers. One lecture hour, and two three-hour laboratories each 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 
Mr. Tiedeman. (II) 

211. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS. 

An advanced course on laboratory technique and manipulation 
as involved in special laboratory problems. One three-hour labo- 
ratory, first semester. Approval of instructor is necessary. Pre- 
requisites, Physics 101-102, or Physics 205-206. Credit, one se- 
mester hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. Warfield, Mr. Tiede- 
man. (II) 

212. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS. 

Similar to Physics 211. Second semester. Credit, one semester 
hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. Warfield, Mr. Tiedeman. (II) 

214. COLOR AND LIGHTING. 

A course on the fundamentals of color phenomena and of illu- 
mination and their applications in the home, in classrooms, on 
the stage, etc. Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory, 
second semester. No prerequisite but approval by the department 
and class chairman is necessary. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Warfield. (II) 

216. SOUND. 

This is a course planned especially for students of music, speech, 
and psychology. It embraces a study of a wide selection of 
sound phenomena and their applications in music, speech, hear- 
ing, architecture, and modern electro-mechanical sound devices. 
Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory, second semester. 
No prerequisite but approval by the department and class chair- 
man is necessary. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$3.00. Mr. Tiedeman. (II) 

301r. PHYSICS. 

Emphasizes those features of physics having greatest applica- 
tion in everyday life. Two lecture hours and one three-hour 
laboratory, either semester. Required of juniors in the B.S. in 
Home Economics course, unless Physics 101-102 is substituted. 
Open to other students subject to the approval of the department 
and of the class chairman. Credit, three semester hours. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Warfield, Mr. Tiedeman, Miss Gill. (Ill) 

310. ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY. 

This course is a logical continuation of Physics 209r, and pays 
special attention to the conditions which must be met to portray 
photographically an original. Some work in color film will be 
given. The student must purchase her own films and papers. 
Prerequisite, Physics 209. One lecture hour and two three-hour 
laboratories, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Tiedeman. (Ill) 



142 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

321. LIGHT. 

An advanced course on physical optics embracing: optical in- 
struments, spectra, interference phenomena, polarized light, na- 
ture of light, absorption and dispersion. Given in alternate years. 
Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory, first semester. 
Prerequisites, Physics 101-102, or 205-206. Credit, three semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $0. Mr. Warfield. (Ill) 

322. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM. 

An advanced course on electrical and magnetic theories and in- 
struments, embracing: electron theory, electrolysis, thermo- 
electricity, electromagnetics, and alternating currents. Given in 
alternate years. Two lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory, 
second semester. Prerequisites, Physics 101-102, or Physics 
205-206. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Mr. Tiedeman. (Ill) 

323. HEAT. 

An advanced course on the theory of heat, embracing: thermo- 
dynamics, molecular physics, quantum theory, and radiations. 
Given in alternate years. Two lecture hours and one three-hour 
laboratory, first semester. Prerequisites, Physics 101-102, or 
Physics 205-206, and Mathematics 103-10U or their equivalents 
Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Tiede- 
man. (Ill) 
(Not given in 1940-41.) 

324. MECHANICS. 

An advanced course on theoretical mechanics, embracing: wave 
motions, gyroscopic actions, dynamics of fluids, and quantum 
mechanics. Given in alternate years. Two lecture hours and 
one three-hour laboratory, second semester. Prerequisites, Physics 
101-102, or Physics 205-206, and Mathematics 103 -10 %, or their 
equivalents. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Mr. Warfield. (Ill) 
(Not given in 1940-41.) 

326. ELECTRONICS. 

A course mainly on the properties and practical applications of 
the electron, embracing: thermionics, photoelectricity, cathode 
rays, X-rays, and radioactivity. Two lecture hours and one 
three-hour laboratory, second semester. Prerequisites, Physics 
101-102, or Physics 205-206. Credit, three semester hours. Labo- 
ratory fee, $.2.00. Mr. Warfield. (Ill) 

328. ELEMENTS OF RADIO COMMUNICATION. 

A course of lectures and laboratory work consisting of elemen- 
tary considerations of the fundamental laws and their applica- 
tions to the circuits of modern radio systems. One lecture hour 
and two three-hour laboratories, second semester. Prerequisites, 
Physics 101-102, or Physics 205-206. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. (Ill) 

331. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS. 

A laboratory course which will allow students who have taken 
Physics 211 and 212 to continue laboratory work. One three- 
hour laboratory, first semester. Prerequisites, Physics 211 and 



Department of Psychology 143 

212 and two other advanced courses in Physics which have been 
completed or are being taken concurrently. Credit, one semester 
hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. Warfield, Mr. Tiedeman. (Ill) 

332. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS. 

Similar to Physics 331. Second semester. Credit, one semester 
hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. Warfield, Mr. Tiedeman. (Ill) 

443 and 444. X-RAY TECHNIQUE. 

A course in the theory of X-rays and practical experience by 
each student in the making of radiographs in all the more com- 
mon positions, using hospital-type equipment; the processing of 
films and instruction in the care, use, and dangers of all types 
of X-ray equipment. The student must purchase her own X-ray 
films. One lecture hour and two three-hour laboratories for the 
year. Prerequisites, Biology 371 and 372 and Physics 101-102 or 
205-206. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00 each 
semester. Mr. Warfield. (Ill) 

450. COORDINATING COURSE (DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN 
PHYSICS). 
A survey of contemporary physics incorporating an historical 
treatment of the discoyery of fundamental laws and of the evo- 
lution of modern theories of physics. Required of all seniors ma- 
joring in Physics. Three lecture hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Warfield, Mr. Tiedeman. (Ill) 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors Highsmith, Martin, Duffy; Associate Pro- 
fessor Barkley; Assistant Professor Chase; Assistant 
Stanland. 

PSYCHOLOGY LABORATORIES— The psychology laboratories include 
a large room suitable for sections in elementary and advanced 
laboratory courses, a special room for mental testing or clinical 
examinations, a laboratory for child psychology, a combined ap- 
paratus room and laboratory, and adjoining lecture rooms. These 
laboratories are equipped with furniture and apparatus suitable 
for use in the laboratory courses. There is also equipment for 
use in the study of special problems and class demonstration. The 
testing room is equipped with materials needed in the common 
mental testing procedures. The equipment for testing children 
is especially adequate. 

211 and 212. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

Designed to present the basic principles and methods of psy- 
chology as an experimental natural science. Two lecture hours 
and three laboratory hours a week for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. Approval of instructor is necessary. Laboratory 
fee, $1.00 a semester. Mr. Barkley. (II) 

221r. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

The development of points of view, problems, and methods of 
psychology; the fundamental principles necessary for under- 
standing the behavior of human beings; the facts and principles 



144 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

of intelligent behavior, motivation, and personality. Three hours 
either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$.50. Mr. Highsmith, Mr. Martin, Miss Duffy, Mr. Barkley, Mr. 
Chase. (II) 

222r. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

The psychological facts and principles in learning, study, indi- 
vidual differences, and adjustment. Three hours either semester. 
Prerequisite, Psychology 221 or its equivalent. Credit, three se- 
mester hours. Laboratory fee, $.50. Mr. Highsmith, Mr. Mar- 
tin, Miss Duffy, Mr. Barkley, Mr. Chase. (II) 

232. APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY. 

A study of the applications of psychology in industry, personnel 
work, advertising, selling, medicine, law, politics, and athletics. 
Special attention is given to problems of vocational guidance 
and individual efficiency. Three hours, second semester. Prere- 
quisite, one course in Psychology. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Barkley. (II) 

326r. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY. 

A general survey of the development of child behavior. Experi- 
ments using children will be performed to illustrate the facts 
of the development of the child. Two lectures and one two-hour 
laboratory period a week for the semester. Prerequisite, Psychol- 
ogy 211-212 or 221. Credit, three semester hours, either semester. 
Laboratory fee, $.50. Mr. Chase. (Ill) 

333r. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 

This course affords an opportunity for students to work indi- 
vidually or in small groups on psychological problems of spe- 
cial interest to them. The work may represent either a survey 
of a given field or intensive investigation of a particular prob- 
lem. The course is especially adapted to student-faculty co- 
operation on minor research problems. Three hours, either se- 
mester. Consult instructor before registering for this course. 
Credit, three semester hours. Members of the Staff. (Ill) 

334r. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 

This course is a continuation of Psychology 333. Three hours, 
either semester. Prerequisite, Psychology 333. Credit, three 
semester hours. Members of Staff. (Ill) 

337r. MENTAL MEASUREMENTS. 

A study of current methods of measuring mental abilities. Prac- 
tice in the administration and scoring of group and individual 
tests. Three hours, either semester. Prerequisites, six hours in 
Psychology. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Highsmith and Miss Stanland. (Ill) 

341. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY AND MENTAL HYGIENE. 

A study of abnormal mental phenomena in their relation to 
normal life, including such topics as sensation; perception; 
thought; sleep; dreams; hypnosis; disassociation ; the psycho- 
neuroses; personality disorders, especially of childhood; the 
fundamental principles of mental hygiene. Three hours, first 
semester. Prerequisite, six hours in Psychology. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Barkley. (Ill) 



Department of Psychology 145 

342. PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE. 

This course deals with developmental characteristics and prob- 
lems of adolescence. Testing devices for studying developmental 
trends and behavior problems will be stresed. Three hours, sec- 
ond semester. Prerequisite, one course in Psychology. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Highsmith. (Ill) 

344. ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, approval of instruc- 
tor. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Martin. (Ill) 

345. THE DEVELOPMENT OF PERSONALITY. 

A study of factors influencing the development of personality. 
Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, six hours in Psychol- 
ogy. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Duffy. (Ill) 

347. MOTIVATION OF BEHAVIOR. 

A study of the sources and development of motives. Three hours, 
first semester. Prerequisite, 6 hours in Psychology, or the equiva- 
lent. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Martin. (Ill) 

348. BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS. 

Study of causes and management of common behavior prob- 
lems in children. Typical cases in various age groups through 
adolescence will be studied in relation to total personality de- 
velopment. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Psychol- 
ogy 326 or 222. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Highsmith. 

449. COORDINATING COURSE. 

Required of majors. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Members of the Staff. (IV) 



RELIGION 

321. THE GROWTH OF HEBREW RELIGION. 

The development of the religion of the Hebrews from the period 
of the earliest records to the beginning of the Christian era, 
with special emphasis on the teachings of the prophets. Par- 
ticular attention will be given to the historical, social, and cul- 
tural background of the various periods of Hebrew religious 
history. The religious ideas of the Hebrews will be considered 
as to their value and permanent significance. Combination of 
lecture and seminar method. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Rowland. 

322. THE LIFE AND TEACHINGS OF JESUS. 

An historical study of the life of Jesus against the background 
of the political, social, economic, cultural, and religious condi- 
tions of his time, and a study of his teachings in connection 
with the situations that called them forth. After consideration 
of the content of the teachings there will be reading and dis- 
cussion as to their applicability to the problems of modern life. 
Combination of lecture and seminar method. Three hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Rowland. 



146 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

271. THE LITERARY STUDY OF THE BIBLE. 

A reverently critical study of the Bible as a part of the world's 
great literature. The purpose sought in the course may be said 
to be a fuller comprehension of the truth of the Bible through 
a more intelligent appreciation of its excellencies of form and 
structure. Representative masterpieces will be considered — 
among them essays, orations, stories, and poems. Two hours, 
first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Smith. (II) (See 
Department of English). 

272. THE LITERARY STUDY OF THE BIBLE. 

A continuation of Course 271. Two hours, second semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Smith. (II) (See Department 
of English). 

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Professors Barney, Underwood, Hooke, Miller; As- 
sociate Professors Laird, Hardr£, LaRochelle; As- 
sistant Professors Abbott, Cutting, Farinholt, Tay- 
lor; Instructor Funderburk. 

FRENCH 

101 and 102. BEGINNING COURSE. 

Texts: An elementary French grammar, a reader for beginners, 
and some easy French text. In this course, special emphasis is 
laid on the fundamental principles of French grammar. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Taylor. (I) 

103 and 104. INTERMEDIATE COURSE. 

The regular sections of 103 and 104 begin with the major em- 
phasis on review of the fundamental principles of French gram- 
mar and gradually devote more time to reading. At least one 
book on French life and customs and one modern literary work 
will be read outside of class. 

Several special sections are available for those whose previous 
training indicates that they will benefit from a different type of 
teaching than the above. The main emphasis from the first is on 
reading and about one thousand pages of text is read outside of 
class during the year. Those continuing French from these sec- 
tions should enter course 207. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. Mr. Underwood, Mr. Hooke, Miss Taylor, 
Miss Farinholt, Mrs. Funderburk. (I) 

105r. ORAL FRENCH. 

Designed to develop some facility of expression in students who 
have had little or no opportunity to hear or to speak French. 
Freshman elective. Open to other students who have had French 
1-2 or its equivalent. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Hardre. (I) 

207. READING FROM EARLIER LITERATURE. 

Reading in chronological order of selections from French Litera- 
ture to 1800, with such verb or other drill as seems desirable. 



Department of Romance Languages 147 

Supplementary reading in French literary history. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Underwood 
and others. (II) (Students may major from 207-208, but those 
who offer French as a teaching subject, whether majoring or 
not, should take French 219-220 or some other course in gram- 
mar and composition). 

208. READINGS FROM MODERN LITERATURE. 

Continuation of Course 207. Literary readings from 1800 to 
present. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Underwood and others. (II) 

209. READING AND COMPOSITION. 

The emphasis in this course is on language, with composition 
and conversation based partly on reading of modern French. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Hooke, Mr. Hardre. (II) 

Note: A student may choose French 207 or 209 and continue 
either in the second semester by 208 or 210, but may not take 
both 207-208 and 209-210 for credit. 

210. READING AND COMPOSITION. 

Continuation of Course 209. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hooke, Mr. Hardre. 

211 and 212. ELEMENTARY CONVERSATION. 

This course is intended as a sophomore elective in French for 
those who desire to gain proficiency in conversation. Those who 
have completed French 209 and 210, or equivalent, but are not 
ready for French 351 and 352 will also be admitted. Three hours 
for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Hardre, Mr. 
Hooke. (II) 

219 and 220. COMPOSITION. 

This one-hour course in composition may be combined with 
French 207-208 above or taken separately by those who feel the 
need of practical exercise on grammatical principles. One hour 
for the year. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Barney. (II) 

325. SURVEY COURSE. 

Lectures, translations in class, and reports from assigned read- 
ings on the general development of French literature from the 
beginning to 1600. This course will give the student a general 
basis for more specific work in literature. Three hours, first 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barney. (Ill) 

326. SURVEY OF MODERN FRENCH LITERATURE. 

A continuation of Course 325. This course covers in outline the 
last three centuries and forms a basis for more specific study. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Barney. (Ill) 

327 and 328. SEVENTEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE. 

The aim of this course is to give a comprehensive view of the 
literature of the period and of the conditions under which it was 
produced. Selected works from the following authors will be 
read: Corneille, Pascal, La Rochefoucauld, Mme de Sevigne, 



148 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Moliere, Racine, La Bruyere, and La Fontaine. Three hours for 
the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Laird. (Ill) 
(Not offered in 1940-1941). 

329 and 330. EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE. 

This course is primarily a study of Voltaire, Montesquieu, 
Diderot, Rousseau and others of the Enlightenment who pre- 
pared the way for modern democracy, liberty and science. Full 
attention is given to drama, fiction, the salons, the quarrel of 
the ancients and moderns, sentimentalism, etc. Three hours for 
the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Underwood. (Ill) 
(Not offered in 1940-1941). 

331 and 332. FRENCH ROMANTICISM. 

A study of the best known poetry, novels, and dramas of the 
first half of the nineteenth century. An effort is made to in- 
crease the students' critical ability and appreciation of poetry. 
Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
Miller. (Ill) 

335 and 336. FRENCH LITERATURE SINCE 1850. 

A study of the better known writers and literary movements of 
the late nineteenth century, such as Balzac, Flaubert, Sainte- 
Beuve, Taine, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Anatole France; realism, 
naturalism, impressionism, symbolism. Three hours for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Underwood. (Ill) 
(Not offered in 1940-1941). 

337 and 338. CONTEMPORARY FRENCH DRAMA. 

A survey of French drama from the closing years of the nine- 
teenth century to the present time. Class discussion and analysis 
of representative plays, and reports on supplementary reading. 
All plays are read in French editions, especially those of La 
Petite Illustration. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester 
hours. Mr. Hooke. (Ill) 

351 and 352. ADVANCED CONVERSATION. 

This course is conducted wholly in French. Its aim is to give a 
more intimate knowledge of France as it is today, together 
with the ability to carry on an ordinary conversation in French. 
Three hours for the year. Prerequisites, French 209 and 210, or 
$11 and 212. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Hardre. (Ill) 

353 and 354. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a comprehensive 
review of French grammar and a thorough grounding in the 
principles of French composition. During the latter part of the 
second semester, special attention is given to the study of French 
letter-writing, both social and commercial. Three hours for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Hardre. (Ill) 

361. PROFESSIONAL REVIEW OF GRAMMAR. 

Professional review of one or more elementary and reference 
grammars. The main principles of grammar will be taken up 
with a view to organizing and extending previous knowledge. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Barney. (Ill) 



Department of Romance Languages 149 

362. PHONETICS. 

A course in both scientific and practical phonetics. Beginning 
with the description of correct position of the vocal organs for 
the reproduction of the sounds represented by the symbols of 
the International Phonetic Association, the rules for the pro- 
nunciation of single words are learned and fixed by much prac- 
tice in phonetic transcription. The students hear the sounds 
from records made by native French professors. This course 
should be taken by all those who expect to teach French. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Bar- 
ney. (Ill) 

365 and 366. FRENCH LITERATURE IN ENGLISH. 

This course is offered for the purpose of acquainting students 
not prepared to pursue the regular courses in French literature 
or not having time for extensive work, with the masterpieces 
of French literature and those works which have affected the 
thought of the world. One hour for the year. Credit, two 
semester hours. Mr. Barney. (Ill) 

371 and 372. CHOSES FRANCAISES. 

A general information course on France and the French people. 
There will be some consideration of geography and history as a 
necessary background, followed by a study of French national 
traits, home life, and institutions. This course is intended to 
give the student an inspirational background for the study of 
French similar to that obtained by travel, and to give the pros- 
pective teacher of that language a fund of information useful 
in her chosen profession. Three hours for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. Miss Laird. (Ill) 

450. COORDINATING COURSE. 

This course will attempt to correlate the student's previous train- 
ing in French and, as far as possible, give her an opportunity 
to view the field as a whole. It should be taken by all seniors 
majoring in French as preparation for the comprehensive ex- 
amination. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Barney and others. (Ill) 

475. THE EARLY FRENCH NOVEL. 

Reading, reports, discussion, and some class translation from 
the sources and beginning of the novel in France to 1800. Three 
hours for the first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Barney. (Ill) 

476. MODERN FRENCH NOVEL. 

Similar to Course 475 in method. Both courses should be elected 
by those who wish to acquire ability for extensive private read- 
ing. Three hours for the second semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Barney. (Ill) 



SPANISH 

101 and 102. ELEMENTARY COURSE. 

Thorough drill is given in pronunciation, vocabulary building, 
and important principles of grammar. This is designed to equip 



150 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

the student with a solid foundation for more advanced study of 
the Spanish language and literature. Texts: An elementary 
grammar; short stories on Spain, Mexico, and South America; 
a short and simple novel. Collateral reading: Three hundred 
pages on the geography and history of the Spanish-speaking 
countries. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 
Miss LaRochelle, Miss Abbott, Miss Cutting, Miss Farinholt. (I) 

103 and 104. INTERMEDIATE COURSE. 

Review of grammar, reading with composition and conversa- 
tion based on texts read. Texts : A review grammar ; novels and 
dramas of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Collateral 
reading: Three hundred pages on the art, music, dance, and 
customs of the Spanish people. Three hours for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. Miss LaRochelle, Miss Abbott, Miss Cutting, 
Miss Farinholt. (I) 

205 and 206. THE SPANISH NOVEL OF THE NINETEENTH CEN- 
TURY AND COMPOSITION. 

A study of the development of the novel from its early begin- 
nings through the nineteenth century. Intensive study of the 
life and works of the nineteenth century novelists. Drill on 
conversation and composition. Texts : Novels of Fernan Caballero, 
Valera, Alarcon, Pereda, Perez Galdos, Pardo Bazan, Clarin, 
and Palacio Valdes; a composition book; a newspaper. Col- 
lateral reading: History of Spanish Literature by Merimee and 
Morley; Introduction to Spanish Literature by Northup; El 
Conde de Lucanor; Amadis de Gaula; Celestina; Lazarillo de 
Tormes; Don Quixote, and two novels of the nineteenth century. 
Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
LaRochelle. (II) 

211 and 212. CONVERSATION. 

This course is intended as a junior or senior elective in Spanish 
for those who desire to gain proficiency in written and spoken 
Spanish with some reference to commercial practice. Spanish is 
used in class as much as possible, though much time is spent 
on composing letters in Spanish and on translation. Free com- 
position and oral practice based on outside reading of news- 
papers and magazines. Use of phonograph records in prepara- 
tion of various types of prose and poetry. Three hours for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Cutting. (II) 

321 and 322. CONTEMPORARY SPANISH NOVEL AND COMPO- 
SITION. 
A special study of the life and representative works of modern 
novelists. Continuation of drill on conversation and composition. 
Texts: Novels of Blasco, Ibanez, Baroja, Valle-Inclan, Ricardo 
Leon, Concha Espina, and Azorin; a composition book; a news- 
paper. Collateral reading: Four contemporary novels. Three 
hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss LaRochelle. 
(Ill) 

323 and 324. SPANISH DRAMA AND COMPOSITION. 

History of the development of the drama from the thirteenth 
century to the present day. Intensive study of the life and works 
of contemporary dramatists. Free composition and oral reports 



Department of Romance Languages 151 

on assigned topics. Texts: Dramas of Perez Galdos, Benavente, 
Linares Rivas, Dicenta, Los Hermanos Quintero, Arniches, Mar- 
quina, and Martinez Sierra; a composition book; a newspaper. 
Collateral reading: History of Spanish Literature by Merimee 
and Morley; Introduction to Spanish Literature by Northup; 
La Vida es Sueno, El Gran Galeoto, Don Juan Tenorio, and two 
contemporary dramas. Three hours for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. Miss LaRochelle. (Ill) 
(Not offered in 1940-1941). 

333. THE NOVEL OF THE GOLDEN AGE. 

A study of Cervantes' Don Quixote in part and some of his 
Novelas Exemplares. Lectures, recitations, and collateral read- 
ing. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Cutting. 

334. The DRAMA OF THE GOLDEN AGE. 

A study of selected plays by Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, 
Ruiz de Alarcon, and Calderon de la Barca. Lectures, recita- 
tions, and collateral reading. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Cutting. (Ill) 

353 and 354. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 

A comprehensive review of the principles of Spanish grammar, 
their practical application in the construction of sentences, para- 
phrasing from Spanish texts, and free composition. This course 
should be taken by those who intend to teach Spanish. Three hours 
for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Abbott. (Ill) 
(Not offered in 1940-1941). 

449 and 450. CO-ORDINATING COURSE— SURVEY OF SPANISH 
LITERATURE. 
An introduction to the general field of Spanish literature from 
its origins to the present time. Lectures, recitations, and re- 
ports in English. Collateral reading in English and Spanish. 
A portion of this course will be devoted to special preparation 
for the comprehensive examination. Three hours for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. Miss Abbott. (Ill) 

ITALIAN 

201 and 202. BEGINNING COURSE. 

Study of grammar supplemented with reading and conversation. 
The student will be taught to understand simple Italian, spoken 
or written, and to pronounce the language correctly. Three hours 
for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Miller. (II) 
(Not offered in 1940-1941 ) . 

303 and 304. INTERMEDIATE COURSE. 

This is a continuation of Course 201 and 202. After a further 
grounding in the principles of grammar, Dante's Inferno and 
selections from Petrarch, Boccaccio, and other authors will be 
read as time permits. Three hours for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. Miss Miller. (Ill) 
(Not offered in 1940-1941). 



152 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

DEPARTMENT OF SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 

Professor Keister ; Assistant Professors Spruill, Adams, 
Parker; Instructors Little john, Lowrance, Harman. 

The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Secretarial Administration is designed to give a broad founda- 
tion of culture on which is built specialized training to prepare 
those who desire to enter the field of secretarial work. The re- 
quirements in the freshman and sophomore years correspond to 
those of a liberal arts course. Certain basic courses in Eco- 
nomics, which give a fundamental understanding of the opera- 
tion of our business and economic organization are required as 
a foundation for the more specialized courses in Secretarial 
Science. 

For the requirements for graduation with a B.S. in Secretarial 
Administration, see page 66. 

211 and 212. TYPEWRITING. 

Instruction is given in this course in the care and use of the 
typewriter. Fundamental training in proper rhythm, touch and 
reach is followed by exercises developing speed. Three hours a 
week for the year. Credit, two semester hours. Required of 
sophomores in the B. S- S. A. curriculum. Laboratory fee, $1.00 
each semester. Mr. Harman. 

311 and 312. ADVANCED TYPEWRITING. 

Emphasis in this course is placed on the development of speed 
and accuracy in typing. The proper form to be used in different 
types of letters, articles, and statistical tabulations will be de- 
veloped. Three hours a week for the year. Credit, two semester 
hours. Required of juniors in the B. S. S. A. curriculum. Lab- 
oratory fee, $1.00 each semester. Mr. Harman. 

321 and 322. SHORTHAND. 

This course aims to develop an understanding of the basic prin- 
ciples of Gregg shorthand and the ability to apply these prin- 
ciples to an extensive shorthand vocabulary. Special emphasis 
is placed upon the reading and writing of material composed 
of brief forms and words of high frequency. Daily for the year. 
Credit, eight semester hours. Required of Juniors in the B. S. S. A. 
curriculum. Laboratory fee, $1.00 each semester. Miss Adams, 
Mrs. Lowrance. 

423. SECRETARIAL SCIENCE. 

An intensive review of the fundamentals of Gregg shorthand. 
Emphasis is placed upon the development of a specialized short- 
hand vocabulary applicable to manufacturing, banking, legal 
work, insurance, etc., in conjunction with training in the taking 
of notes and in transcribing them correctly. Special attention 
is given to form and placement as well as to speed and ac- 
curacy. Prerequisite, 321 and 322 or the equivalent. Daily, first 
semester. Credit, four semester hours. Required of seniors in 
the B. S. S. A. curriculum. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Miss Spruill. 



Department of Secretarial Science 153 

424. OFFICE MANAGEMENT AND PRACTICES. 

The aim of this course is to present actual office situations, and, 
through the assignment of definite problems, to develop an 
understanding of the principles, materials, and techniques of 
office practices and management. Special attention is given to 
the various systems of filing. Dictation and transcription are 
required throughout the course. Three hours a week, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Required of seniors in 
the B. S. S. A. curriculum. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Miss Spruill. 

426r. BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE. 

This course deals with the psychological basis and fundamental 
principles of effective business letter writing; a detailed treat- 
ment of the various types of letters with which the secretary 
has to deal in meeting a wide variety of business situations] 
special projects which afford practice in applying principles; 
and a critical study of current practices in business correspond- 
ence. Three hours, each semester. Open to seniors. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Parker. 

431r. OFFICE MACHINES. 

A one-semester course designed to give the students a fair degree 
of skill in the use of such office machines and equipment as the 
following: gelatin duplicators, stencil duplicators, adding and 
calculating machines, dictating machines, billing and bookkeep- 
ing machines. Consideration is given to the organization of office 
machines courses by the rotation plan, as well as methods for 
conducting courses in this subject. Three hours, either semester. 
Required of all senior B. S. S. A. students. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Adams. 

335 and 336. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING FOR BUSINESS 
TEACHERS. 
Accounting principles and systems applicable to different types 
of businesses : accounting for partnerships and corporations and 
their reorganization, liquidation, and consolidation; accounting 
for branch houses and affiliated corporations, cost accounting; 
special reserves, investments and the elements of actuarial sci- 
ence. Principles are applied by solving numerous accounting 
problems. Prerequisite, Economics 233 and 23U or the equiva- 
lent. Three hours for the year. For juniors. Credit, six semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Bonner. 

Professional Courses for Business Teachers 

459r. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN SHORTHAND, TYPE- 
WRITING, AND BOOKKEEPING. 
An evaluation of the various methods of teaching shorthand, 
typewriting, and bookkeeping with emphasis on current methods 
in each case; objectives; equipment; special projects and teach- 
ing devices and techniques; classroom procedures; testing and 
remedial teaching; and a study of texts and available teaching 
materials for high schools and adult and vocational evening 
schools will be dealt with in this course. Three hours, each semes- 
ter. Open to seniors. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Parker. 



154 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

461r. SUPERVISED TEACHING OF BUSINESS SUBJECTS. 

In this course, the methods of teaching business subjects are 
applied to actual classroom teaching in the Curry Demonstration 
School and in the Greensboro Senior High School. Students may 
choose from a wide variety of subjects the field in which they 
wish to do their directed teaching. Demonstration teaching, les- 
son planning, teaching under supervision, and conferences con- 
stitute the work of the course. Three hours, each semester. Open 
to seniors. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Parker, Miss Adams, 
Mr. Littlejohn, Mrs. Lowrance. 

465. PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS EDUCATION. 

A study of the agencies and institutions for business education, 
their scope and functions. A critical study of the aim and ob- 
jectives of business education. The various business curricula 
are evaluated in relation to modern educational philosophy, the 
trends in business education, and the findings of business educa- 
tion research. Tests, measurements, and standards in commercial 
subjects; trait development, job analysis, occupational surveys 
and follow-up studies in business curricula building, and the 
need for business education research will receive careful atten- 
tion. Open to juniors and seniors. Credit, three semester hours. 
(Not given in 1940-1941). 

467r. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN THE SOCIAL BUSINESS 
SUBJECTS. 
A study of the aims and objectives, the selection, analysis, and 
organization of appropriate textbook and supplementary subject 
matter, and effective methods of teaching the social-business sub- 
jects in high schools and adult and vocational evening schools. 
Elementary economics, business law, general business, business 
organization, economic geography, and other business subjects 
that have for their objective an understanding of organized 
business, business relations, and the various business problems 
met by the individual in his personal, social, and civic activities. 
Special emphasis is given to the methods whereby consumer 
material may be infused within each of the social-business sub- 
jects. Three hours, each semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Littlejohn. 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Johnson ; Associate Professors Shivers, Moss- 
man ; Assistant Hilford. 

211 and 212. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY. 

A general survey of introductory Sociology with considerable 
emphasis on social change, current social problems and social 
control. Three hours for the year. Elective for sophomores. 
Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Johnson, Miss Mossman. (II) 

321. PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY. 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the 
science of society. The course will consider the origin, nature, 
and development of social organization as conditioned by physi- 



Department of Sociology 155 

cal, psychological, and cultural factors; the social institutions, 
such as property, the family, the church, and the state; and the 
inter-relation between human nature and culture. Modern social 
problems will be examined in relation to theories of social 
progress. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Johnson, Miss Mossman. (Ill) 

322. SOCIAL PROBLEMS. 

This course deals with various current social problems and social 
maladjustments. It is concerned with such processes as depend- 
ency, deficiency, degeneration, unrest, demoralization, disorgan- 
ization, and revolution. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Johnson, Miss Mossman. (Ill) 

323. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

A study of individual and collective behavior in relation to the 
various social and cultural influences. This course deals with 
group behavior conditioned by original human nature, the cul- 
tural environment, and differences in class interests. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johnson. (Ill) 

324. RURAL SOCIAL PROBLEMS. 

The social problems which are peculiar to rural life, such as 
rural education, rural recreation, the rural home, the rural 
church, will be studied. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Johnson. (Ill) 

326. COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION. 

The approach to the study of the community is made by con- 
sidering human nature and the development of personality. This 
is followed by a study of the processes involved in the economic, 
ecological, and cultural organization of the community. Three 
hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Sociology 211-212 or 321, 
or in the case of seniors, the consent of the instructor. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Mossman. (Ill) 

327. INTERRACIAL RELATIONS. 

After a brief account of the cultural and historical background 
of the Negro in Africa, this course will consider the problems 
of amalgamation, assimilation, population, racial mental equip- 
ment, and migration. With this introduction there will follow 
an analysis of the present political, social, cultural, and economic 
status of the Negro in the United States, and a consideration 
of such problems as education, health, sanitation, and desirable 
interracial relationships. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Johnson. (Ill) 

328. ANTHROPOLOGY. 

In this course will be discussed the earliest appearance of man, 
the prehistoric history of Europe, the types of mankind, uni- 
versal human traits, culture, the diffusion of culture. The aims 
of this course are to give a perspective of the general history 
of mankind and an analysis of representative cultures of primi- 
tive and civilized societies for the purpose of recognizing the 
universal human traits reflected in property ownership, marriage, 
etc. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Johnson. (Ill) 



156 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

333. THE FAMILY. 

An historical introduction to the problem of the family is fol- 
lowed by a consideration of such materials as the natural and 
institutional family, the modern family, the home and the family, 
the family and the community, methods of studying the family, 
and the mechanism and processes of interaction taking place in 
the family. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Shivers. (Ill) 

335r. MARRIAGE. 

A study of the practical problems of courtship and marriage 
with emphasis upon personal relationships. Three hours, either 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Prerequisite, Sociology 
333 except for seniors. Miss Shivers. (Ill) 

336. CRIMINOLOGY. 

This course will consider theories of criminology and punish- 
ment. It will analyze case studies of delinquents; compare and 
criticize programs for the social treatment of the criminal. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Shivers. (Ill) 

339. INTRODUCTION TO THE FIELD OF SOCIAL WORK. 

A general view of the entire field of social work including his- 
torical background and the present scope, aims and methods. 
Field trips are taken to public and private social agencies. Three 
hours, first semester. Open to majors in Sociology and others 
with permission of the professor. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Mossman. (Ill) 

340. INTRODUCTION TO THE FIELD OF SOCIAL WORK. 

A study of the organization and methods of social agencies, with 
special emphasis upon the techniques used in treatment in special- 
ized fields. Field work to include study of local agencies. Two 
class lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory period, second 
semester. Open to those who have taken Sociology 339. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Mossman. (Ill) 

342. SOCIAL PROBLEMS OF CHILD WELFARE. 

A discussion of the methods of caring for dependent, neglected, 
and delinquent children with emphasis upon the types of agencies 
which have been established to deal with these problems. Three 
hours. Second semester. Miss Mossman. (Ill) 
(This course to be given alternate years with Sociology 344.) 

344. AN INTRODUCTION TO METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH. 
A course to study methods of planning and conducting com- 
munity surveys, and methods of study of social conditions and 
institutions. Three hours, second semester. 

(This course to be given alternate years with Sociology 342.) 
(Not offered in 1941.) 

450. COORDINATING COURSE— SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY. 

A seminar in contemporary sociological theories. Three hours, 
second semester. For majors and minors in Sociology. Required 
for majors. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johnson, Miss 
Shivers. (Ill) 



The School of Music 157 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

H. Hugh Altvater, A.B., Mus.M., Dean. 

COURSES IN MUSICAL THEORY AND MUSIC EDUCATION 
COURSES IN APPLIED MUSIC 

The School of Music offers regular courses leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Music, with major in piano, organ, 
violin, violoncello, voice, public school music, or orchestral in- 
struments. Students who wish to pursue music without the 
specialization which is necessary for this degree may elect music 
as a major in the Bachelor of Arts course. 

All students majoring in music are required to be members of 
the college choir or orchestra unless excused by the dean of the 
School of Music. 

The fees for lessons in Applied Music (piano, organ, violin, voice, 
violoncello, and wind instruments) are given under the head 
of "Expense." (Consult the index). 

CURRICULUM IN MUSIC 

A. Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music with 
the major in piano*, organf, violint, or violoncello^. 

SEM. SEM. 

Freshman HRS. Sophomore HRS. 

Music 101-102, Harmony 6 Music 201-202, Harmony 6 

Music 111-112, Sight Sing- Music 231-232, History of 

ing and Ear Training 4 Music 6 

Applied Music 101-102 6 Applied Music 201-202 6 

English 101-102 6 English 211-212 6 

Modern Language 6 Modern Language 6 

Hygiene 101 3 Music 211-212, Sight Sing- 
ing and Ear Training 2 

31 32 

SEM. SEM. 

Junior hrs. Senior HRS. 

Music 301-302, Counter- Music 401-402, Composi- 

point 4 tion 4 

Applied Music 301-302 10 Applied Music 401-402 10 

Psychology 221 3 Music 455-456, Instrumen- 

Music 355-356, Form and tation 2 

Analysis 4 Music Elective 11 

Music Elective 4 College Elective 3 

College Elective 3 

28 30 

* Students majoring in piano who are deficient in sight-reading must pur- 
sue a regular non-credit course in this field until the faculty passes favorably 
upon their sight" reading ability. Piano majors are required to participate in 
ensemble group rehearsals at the request of their teacher. 

7 Students majoring in organ must elect Music 323-324. 

i Violin and violoncello majors are required to play in ensemble groups at 
request of teacher. 

The School of Music is an Associate Member of the National Association of 
Schools of Music. 



158 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



Note: If a student pursuing the above courses plans to teach 
her major subject in the public schools, the following courses 
must be taken as electives : 

Teaching Methods in major subject 6 

Practice Teaching 6 

Psychology 222 3 

Education 350 3 



B. The course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
with a major in voice is as follows: 



SEM. 

Freshman hrs. 
Music 101-102, Harmony 6 
Music 111-112, Sight Sing- 
ing and Ear Training 4 

Voice 103-104 4 

Piano 113-114 2 

English 101-102 6 

German ti 

Hygiene 101 3 



SEM. 

Sophomore hrs. 

Music 201-202, Harmony 6 
Music 231-232, History of 

Music 6 

Voice 203-204 4 

Piano 213-214 2 

English 211-212 6 

French 6 

Music 211-212, Sight Sing- 
ing and Ear Training 2 



31 



32 



SEM. 

Junior hrs. 

Voice 303-304 8 

Psychology 221 3 

Italian 6 

Music Elective 8 

College Elective 3 

Music 311-312, Sight Sing- 
ing and Ear Training 2 

30 



SEM. 

Senior hrs. 

Music 355-356, Form and 

Analysis 4 

Voice 403-404 8 

Music 435, Conducting 2 

Music Elective 11 

College Elective 3 



28 



See footnote to previous curriculum for list of courses needed 
for State certification of graduates from voice course. 

A candidate for the degree in voice must demonstrate her ability 
to play piano accompaniments of average difficulty before the 
completion of her course. 



The School of Music 



159 



CURRICULA IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music. 



C. GENERAL COURSE 

SEM. 

Freshman hrs. 
Music 101-102, Harmony 6 
Music 111-112, Sight Sing- 
ing and Ear Training 4 

Piano 101-102 6 

English 101-102 6 

Modern Language 6 

Hygiene 101 3 



31 



D. INSTRUMENTAL SU- 
PERVISION COURSE 

SEM. 

Freshman hrs. 
Music 101-102, Harmony 6 
Music 111-112, Sight Sing- 
ing and Ear Training 4 

Major Orchestral Instru- 
ment 107-108 „ 4 

Piano 117-118 „... 2 

English 101-102 6 

Modern Language 6 

Hygiene 101 3 

~31 



SEM. 

Sophomore hrs. 

Music 201-202, Harmony 6 
Music 231-232, History of 

Music 6 

Music 211-212, Sight Sing- 
ing and Ear Training 2 

Piano 201-202 6 

English 211-212 6 

Modern Language 6 



32 



SEM. 

Sophomore HRS. 

Music 201-202, Harmony 6 
Music 231-232, History of 

Music 6 

Music 211-212, Sight Sing- 
ing and Ear Training 2 

Major Orchestral Instru- 
ment 207-208 4 

Piano 217-218 2 

English 211-212 6 

Modern Language 6 

~32 



SEM. 

Junior hrs. 

Music 315-316, Elementary 

School Music Methods 4 
Music 311-312, Sight Sing- 
ing and Ear Training 2 

Music 335-336, Orchestral 

Instrument Class 4 

Voice 305-306 4 

Voice Technic 325-326 2 

Psychology 221-222 6 

Music 301-302, Counter- 
point 4 

Music 355-356, Form and 

Analysis 4 



30 



SEM. 

Junior HRS. 

Music 311-312, Sight Sing- 
ing and Ear Training 2 

Music 315-316, Elementary 
School Music Methods 4 

Major Orchestral Instru- 
ment 307-308 4 

Music 335-336, Orchestral 
Instrument Class „ 4 

Psychology 221-222 6 

Music 301-302, Counter- 
point 4 

Music 355-356, Form and 
Analysis 4 

Major Orchestral Instru- 
ment (String) 317-318 3 

31 



160 



Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



SEM. 

Senior hrs. 
Music 415-416, Music Ap- 
preciation, Methods, Se- 
lection of Materials 4 

Music 445-446, High 

School Music Methods 4 

Voice 405-406 4 

Music 465-466, Supervised 

Teaching 6 

Vocal Technic 425-426 2 

Education 350 3 

Violin 475-476 3 

Music 455-456, Instru- 
mentation 2 

Music 435, Conducting 2 



SEM. 

Senior hrs. 

Music 415-416, Music Ap- 
preciation, Methods, Se- 
lection of Materials 4 

Major Orchestral Instru- 
ment 407-408 4 

Music 445-446, High 

School Music Methods 4 

Music 465-466, Supervised 
Teaching 6 

Education 350 3 

Music 455-456, Instrumen- 
tation 2 

Music 435, Conducting 2 

fMinor Orchestral Instru- 
ment (Woodwind) 417- 
418 2 

-{•Minor Orchestral Instru- 
ment (Brass) 417-418 2 



30 



29 



CURRICULUM FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS 
WITH A MAJOR IN MUSIC 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, with the major in 
piano, organ, voice, violin or violoncello. One hundred and 
twenty semester hours required for graduation. 



SEM. 

Freshman hrs. 

Music 101-102 6 

Applied Music 109-110, 

Piano, Voice, Violin 

or Violoncello, Organ 4 

English 101-102 6 

History 101-102 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Hygiene 101 3 



SEM. 

Sophomore hrs. 

Music 201-202 6 

Applied Music 209-210, 
Piano, Voice, Violin 

or Violoncello, Organ 4 

English 211-212 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Social Science 6 

Elective 2 



31 



30 



SEM. 

Junior hrs. 

Music 231-232 6 

Applied Music 309-310, 
Piano, Voice, Violin 

or Violoncello. Organ 4 

Science or Mathematics 6 

Music 301-302 4 

Electives 9 



SEM. 

Senior hrs. 

Music 401-402, Composi- 
tion 4 

Apolied Music 409-410, 
Piano, Voice, Violin 
or Violoncello, Organ 4 

Science or Mathematics 6 

Electives 16 



29 



30 



t Students in Minor Orchestral Instruments (Woodwind or Brass) will 
have one private lesson each week. 



The School of Music 161 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

The list of requirements in Applied Music as given below must 
not be misunderstood to be a complete statement of work needed 
to satisfy credit standards. The compositions mentioned are 
to be interpreted merely as symbols of stages of advancement. 
A jury of faculty members will decide upon each student's 
qualifications for entrance or advancement. 

PIANO COURSE 

Entrance Requirements: Major and minor scales and arpeggii 
at moderate tempi; Etudes such as Czerny op. 299; Heller op. 
47; Little Preludes and Fugues, Bach; Easier Two-part Inven- 
tions, Bach; compositions by standard composers equivalent in 
difficulty to Mozart, Sonata in C major, No. 3; Haydn, Sonata 
G major, No. 11; Beethoven Sonata op. 49, No. 2. 
Freshman Year: Major and minor scales M.M. 108. Major and 
minor, dominant seventh and diminished seventh arpeggii M.M. 
72; trill one, two, four eight notes, M.M. 60; legato and staccato 
octaves at moderate speed. Czerny, op. 299 and Cramer; Bach, 
Two-part Inventions; early sonatas of Haydn, Mozart, Bee- 
thoven, compositions of equal difficulty from romantic and mod- 
ern schools. Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester* 
hours. 

Sophomore Year: Technical work continued; scales M.M. 132. 
Cramer; Czerny op. 740; Bach, Three-part Inventions; easier 
dance movements from French suites; Beethoven Sonatas op. 
14, No. 1; op. 14, No. 2; romantic and modern compositions. 
Three hours for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 
Junior Year: Major and minor scales M.M. 144; scales in thirds, 
sixths, tenths, M.M. 132 ; other technical work continued. Czerny, 
op. 740; Clementi, Gradus and Parnassum; French and English 
suites; easier preludes and fugues from W.T.C., Bach; more 
difficult Beethoven sonatas ; compositions by Schumann, Schubert, 
Chopin, Rubinstein, Liszt, MacDowell, Debussy and others. Five 
hours for the year. Credit, ten semester hours. 
Senior Year: Technical work continued; Bach, preludes and 
fugues from W.T.C.; Chopin, Etudes, a wide repertoire embrac- 
ing a sonata, concerto, and pieces by classic, romantic, and modern 
composers. Complete public recital. Five hours for the year. 
Credit, ten semester hours. 

VOICE COURSE 

Because of the highly individual character of the voice, it is 
not possible to indicate stages of development so accurately as 
in the case of instruments. Entrance examinations will have to 
do with ability to sing on pitch, capacity to phrase simpler songs, 
general musical intelligence, and reading ability. 
Freshman Year: Voice classification, tone production exercises, 
diction study. Songs from Volumes I and II of Italian An- 
thology "Songs of the Seventeenth Century." Old English clas- 
sics. Two hours for the year. Credit, four semester hours. 
Sophomore Year: Technical study continued. Songs by Schu- 
bert, Brahms, and Continuation of study from Italian Anthol- 
ogy. Arias from standard oratorios. French songs by Faure, 



162 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

Widor, Vidal, etc. Two hours for the year. Credit, four se- 
mester hours. 

Junior Year: Continued study of German, English, French, 
Italian songs. English list should include works by Chadwick, 
Scott, Beach, or their artistic equivalent. At least two French 
or Italian arias should be included. Four hours for the year. 
Credit, eight semester hours. 

Senior Year: Continuation of previous year's study on more 
advanced basis. Complete public recital. Four hours for the 
year. Credit, eight semester hours. 

VIOLIN COURSE 

Entrance Requirements: The student should be able to pursue 
to her advantage the study of the 42 Etudes of Kreutzer. A 
previous thorough study of the Kayser, op. 20, the Mazas Spe- 
cial Studies and the Dont Exercises Preparatory to Kreutzer is 
recommended. 

Freshman Year: Careful review of previous technical study. 
Sevcik trill studies. Kreutzer Etudes. Three octave scales and 
arpeggios. Concertos of Bach, Viotti. Three hours for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. 

Sophomore Year: Fiorillo Etudes, double stop studies. Con- 
certos, Spohr, No. 2; Viotti, No. 22. Three hours for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. 

Junior Year: Rode Caprices. Concertos, Bruch, Mendelssohn; 
sonatas, Tartini and Corelli. Five hours for the year. Credit, 
ten semester hours. 

Senior Year: Studies by Gavinies and Schradieck. Bach solo 
sonatas. Selected great concertos and sonatas. Smaller modern 
works. Complete public recital. Viola study required. Five 
hours for the year. Credit, ten semester hours. 

VIOLONCELLO COURSE 

Entrance Requirements: Major scales in 2 octaves; ability to 
play musically an easy slow movement from the classics. 
Freshman Year: Scales in 3 octaves, thumb position studies 
from Fitzenhagen Op. 28; Lee Op. 31, Bk. 1, Dotzauer Op. 120, 
C. Schroeder Ops. 44, 57. Easy pieces by Popper, Squire, Had- 
ley. Easy sonata by Marcello, Breval, or equivalent. 
Sophomore Year: Arpeggios, scales in double stops and broken 
thirds. Lee Op. 31, Bk. 2, C. Schroeder Op. 45, Franchomme Op. 
35, Grutzmacher Op. 38, Buchler Op. 21. Early Sonatas using 
thumb position. Beethoven Op. 5, No. 2, Brahms Op. 38, or 
equivalent. Smaller works by Faure, Schmits, Saint-Saens. 
Junior Year: Orchestral Studies. Cossmann Op. 10, Servais 
Op. 11, Merk Op. 11, Duport 21 Studies. Bach Suite I, II, or 
III. Sonata by Chopin, Debussy, Ropartz, or equivalent; Varia- 
tions by Tschaikowsky, Boellmann, or equivalent; Smaller works 
by Lekeu, Granados, Roger-Ducasse, etc. 

Senior Year: Advanced Orchestral Studies. Bach Suite IV, V, 
or VI. Sonata by Delius, Honegger, Hure, Toch, or equivalent. 
Concerto by Boccherini, Haydn, Dvorak, Delius, or equivalent. 
Smaller works. Recital. 



The School of Music 163 

ORGAN COURSE 

Entrance Requirements: The completion of the Freshman re- 
quirements in Piano of this College or their equivalent. 
Second Year: The foundations of organ technic are laid by the 
study of simple exercises in legato, pedal and manual playing 
by Stainer, followed by the Caspar Koch Pedal Scales, the com- 
pletion of at least four of the "Little Eight Preludes and 
Fugues" by Bach, easy preludes and offertories, and intensive 
study of the art of Hymn playing. 

Third Year: Completion of the "Little Eight Preludes and 
Fugues" by Bach, and at least two of the more difficult preludes 
and fugues, such as the Cathedral Prelude and Fugue in E 
minor, and the Short G minor Fugue, one of the easier sonatas 
by Mendelssohn or Guilmant, standard pieces of the German and 
French school. "Studies in Pedal Phrasing" by Dudley Buck. 
Choir accompaniments. Keyboard modulation and transposi- 
tion. 

Fourth Year: Larger preludes and fugues by Bach, sonatas 
and compositions by Widor, Vierne, Bonnet, Karg-Elert, and 
others of the modern school. Oratorio accompaniments. Com- 
plete public recital. 

COURSE IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

To major in Music Education the student must have completed 
the work of the freshman year in the School of Music, including 
freshman piano; must have an acceptable singing voice; a high 
degree of skill in sight-singing and ear-training, and a personal- 
ity that shows promise of successful teaching ability. 

RECITAL ATTENDANCE 

Students pursuing regular courses in the School of Music are 
required to attend all faculty and student recitals and the per- 
formances of the College Concert Course. 

CARNEGIE MUSIC LIBRARY 

The Carnegie Corporation of New York City in 1935 awarded 
to Woman's College a "College Music Set" consisting of a li- 
brary of 826 records, 250 music scores, 125 works on music his- 
tory, appreciation, biography and reference books, and a Cape- 
hart reproducing machine. This award is valued at $2,750. 
Two rooms in the Music Building have been set aside as a li- 
brary to house this valuable collection. A librarian is in charge, 
and the library is kept open daily, not only for the students of 
the music history and appreciation classes, but for the use of 
all students and members of the college community who may 
wish to acquaint themselves with the music of the great masters. 

STUDENTS' RECITALS 

Students' recitals are given weekly, at which time works studied 
in the classroom are performed before the students of the Music 
Department. All students majoring in music are required to 
attend these recitals and to take part in them when requested to 
do so. These semi-public appearances are of great assistance in 
enabling the student to acquire that ease and self-possession so 
essential to a successful public performance. 



164 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

ARTISTS' RECITALS AND CONCERTS 

Not less important than classroom instruction is the opportun- 
ity of hearing good music rendered by artists of superior abil- 
ity. To afford students this opportunity a regular series of re- 
citals and concerts is given annually, the best artists available 
being secured. 

Recitals and concerts are given frequently during the school 
year by members of the music faculty. 

COLLEGE VESTED CHOIR 

The college Vested Choir is composed of one hundred and twen- 
ty-five college students who rehearse twice weekly and sing in 
chapel once each week. In addition, the choir studies one or 
more of the great choral works, which, with the assistance of 
soloists, is presented in public performance. The choir sings for 
the university sermons and other important college events. 

THE ORCHESTRA 

Membership in the college orchestra is open to all students who 
play an orchestral instrument sufficiently well to meet the re- 
quirements of the director. Two rehearsals are held each week 
throughout the college year, and attendance is required of stu" 
dents who are studying an orchestral instrument. Public con- 
certs are given during the college year as often as circumstances 
warrant. The orchestra is under the direction of Dean Alt- 
vater. One semester hour's credit is granted for two semesters' 
work in the orchestra. 

THE BAND 

The purpose of the College Band is three-fold: (1) the recrea- 
tion and musical enjoyment of its members, (2) the musical 
advancement of the entire college, (3) the provision of a work- 
ing laboratory for instrumental public school music students. 
During the fall season the emphasis is on such traditional band 
activities as marching, playing for athletic events, participation 
in a small number of worthy community projects and celebra- 
tions. During the winter the band functions as a concert and 
symphonic organization dealing with a much higher grade of 
music. The band is equipped with a number of high quality in- 
struments furnished by the college, also with uniforms for the 
entire membership. As the number of instruments is limited, 
students are urged to possess their own whenever possible. 

MADRIGAL CLUB 

The Madrigal Club is an organization of the Music Education 
Department. The membership of the club is made up of sopho- 
mores, juniors, and seniors who are majoring or minoring in 
music education, and faculty members of this department. Stu- 
dent officers administer the affairs of the club. The club's ac- 
tivities are planned to enrich the members' musical experience, 
broaden their interest and pride in their prospective profession, 
and to familiarize them with current developments in the field 
of music education. 



The Commercial Department 165 

THE GLEE CLUB 

The Glee Club is made up of students selected from the Voice 
classes, the enrollment being limited to thirty members. Mu- 
sicianship and responsibility as well as vocal quality are con- 
sidered in making the selections. An intensive study of sacred 
and secular works, covering a wide variety of styles, is included 
in the year's work, and the group makes concert appearances 
both on and off the campus. The Glee Club meets twice a week 
under the direction of Assistant Professor Oncley. 

ANNUAL HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC CONTEST-FESTIVAL 

One of the major activities sponsored by the School of Music 
for the improvement of music in the State is the annual North 
Carolina Music Contest-Festival for High Schools. District 
elimination contests for the town and consolidated high schools 
are held in ten centers in the State, and those with high scores in 
these district contests, enter the annual State contest held at 
the College in April of each year. The attendance at the twen- 
tieth annual contest held in April, 1939, was 5600 students. 
Three hundred and fifty-seven schools participated in the State 
and District contests; one hundred and sixty-nine schools were 
represented in one or more events in the State contest. These 
annual performances have given the music teachers, supervisors, 
and students a splendid opportunity to compare their work with 
that done in the other schools. The contest has in this way made 
a real contribution to the rapid development of music in the 
schools of the State. 



THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

*Assistant Professor Joyce, Director; Instructors, Mar- 

LEY, HARRELL, PERECINIC. 

Applicants for admission to the Commercial Depart- 
ment must meet the regular college entrance require- 
ments. 

In addition to completing the courses listed below, 
which provide a minimum of 31 credit hours, students 
enrolled in the one-year Commercial Course must meet 
the special requirements of the department. 

Credit Hours 

Typewriting 1, 2 6 

Shorthand 1, 2 12 

Accounting 3 

Business Correspondence 3 

Office Training 4 

Hygiene 2 

Physical Education 1 



* On leave 1939-1940. 



166 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATE 

Before being issued a certificate by the College, the 
Department requires that students be able to take dic- 
tation at the rate of one hundred words a minute and 
to type accurately at a minimum rate of fifty words a 
minute. 

1. SHORTHAND. 

This course includes the direct application and theory of Gregg 
shorthand as presented through word building, phrasing, and 
letter writing. Emphasis is placed on the proper arm, hand, 
and finger movements essential to the development of rapid, 
fluent writing, and on transcription of sentences, simple busi- 
ness letters, and articles. Six credit hours. Mrs. Marley, Miss 
Harrell. 

2. SHORTHAND. 

Review of theory, including principles of word building, brief 
forms, abbreviations, and phrasing; dictation and transcription 
of business letters and material taken from editorials and court 
testimonials. Emphasis is placed not only on the development 
of speed and accuracy in taking dictation and in transcribing 
notes, but also on the effective arrangement of different types 
of written business communication and materials taken from 
print. Six credit hours. Mrs. Marley, Miss Harrell. 

8. TYPEWRITING. 

In this course students study the use and care of the typewriter. 
Exercises are given for the developing of proper rhythm, touch, 
and reach, and the writing from various kinds of copy. Em- 
phasis is placed on rhythm, accuracy, and the development of 
speed. Problems in arrangement of special material are given. 
Three credit hours. Miss Perecinic. 

9. TYPEWRITING. 

Instruction in the form and arrangement of letters, articles, 
statistical tabulations, special emphasis being placed upon ef- 
fective proportion in arranging different types of material and 
in copying from rough drafts. Timed tests are given for ac- 
curacy and speed, as well as direct dictation at the machine. 
Three credit hours. Miss Perecinic. 

11. BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE. 

This course includes the study of the principles and rules of 
standard English as applied to the needs of business. Spelling, 
vocabulary building, and the mechanical details of writing are 
an important part of the course. Practical experience is given 
in writing various types of letters and other forms of business 
correspondence. Three credit hours. Miss Harrell. 

12. OFFICE TRAINING. 

This course includes lectures and reading assignments on sub- 
jects relating to business ethics and etiquette. Laboratory proj- 
ects include practice in operating adding machines, comptomet- 



The Commercial Department 167 

ers, ediphones, billing machines, and duplicating machines. 
Practice is given in filing, indexing, proof reading, and stencil 
writing and in the preparation of business papers and itiner- 
aries. Special care is taken to develop the occupational intel- 
ligence of the student. Four credit hours. Mrs. Marley, Miss 
Perecinic. 

14. ACCOUNTING. 

This course is intended to provide the stenographic student 
with reasonable knowledge of accounting principles necessary 
for her to understand intelligently and to execute the duties 
common to all office workers. It covers the basic principles of 
accounting theory and the development of accounts, the presen- 
tation and interpretation of financial statements, as well as the 
duties of the bookkeeper at the close of the fiscal period. Three 
credit hours. Mrs. Marley, Miss Perecinic. 

PLACEMENT SERVICE 

The department maintains constant contact with the leading 
commercial and industrial institutions of the State and co- 
operates with the College Placement Bureau in securing posi- 
tions for those students successfully completing the course. 

LABORATORY FEE 

A typewriting laboratory fee of $2.00 each semester is required 
of every student in the Commercial Department. 



VIII. Registry 



FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

Abbott, Alice K., Assistant Professor, Romance Languages 

Adams, Maude L., Assistant Professor, Secretarial Science 

Alexander, Louise B., Associate Professor, Political Science 

Allen, Bernice, Field Teacher Trainer, Home Economics 

Allen, Dorothy S., Instructor, Education 

Altvater, H. Hugh, Professor, Music ; Dean of School of Music 

Anderson, Elizabeth, Assistant, Biology 

Anselm, George, Professor, Education 

Anthony, Hallie, Secretary, Public Relations Department 

Arnett, A. M., Professor, History 

Arundel, Edna, Instructor, Biology 

Barkley, Key L., Associate Professor, Psychology 

Barney, W. S., Professor, Romance Languages 

Barrow, Elva E., Associate Professor, Chemistry 

Barton, Helen, Professor, Mathematics 

Bonner, Brant, Instructor, Economics 

Bowers, Mrs. Mabel G., Instructor, Home Economics 

Bowling, Sarah, Order Assistant and Secretary to the Librarian 

Boyd, Alice L., Assistant Cataloguer 

Boyd, Mrs. Estelle, Supervisor of Dormitories 

Bridgers, John E., Jr., Associate Professor, English 

Brownlee, Jean, Instructor, Physical Education 

Brummitt, Mary E., Assistant, Biology 

Bunting, Frederick H., Assistant Professor, Economics 

Burns, Helen, Counselor and Freshman Class Chairman 

*Bush, May D., Instructor, English 

Byrd, Clara B., Alumnae Secretary 

Campbell, Mabel, Professor, Home Economics 

Carlsson, Victoria, Professor, Hygiene 

Carter, Anne Fulton, Counselor 

Cassell, Sara Sue, Assistant Dietitian 

Chase, Wilton P., Assistant Professor, Psychology 

Clark, John A., Associate Professor, Philosophy 

Clark, Hazel, Counselor 

Clement, Dorothy Lee, Instructor, Music 

Clutts, O. P., Professor, Education 

Coit, Laura H., Secretary of the College 

Coldwell, Inez, Associate Professor, Biology 

Cole, Rebecca, Counselor 

Coleman, Mary C, Professor, Physical Education 

Collings, Ruth M., (M.D.), Physician and Professor of Hygiene 

Cooke, Elizabeth P., Assistant, Home Economics 

Cook, John H., Professor, Education 

Coxe, Agnes N., Assistant Professor, Home Economics 

Cutting, Helen, Assistant Professor, Romance Languages 

Davis, Dorothy, Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

Denneen, Marie B., Associate Professor, Education 

Dickieson, George W., Instructor, Music 

Dorsett, Wilbur, Assistant, Dramatics 

Doub, Bessie, Assistant Dietitian 

Draper, Bernice E., Associate Professor, History 

Duffy, Elizabeth, Professor, Psychology 

Dunn, J. Arthur, Professor, English 

Edwards, Flora White, Assistant Professor, Home Economics 

Edwards, Margaret M., Professor, Home Economics 

Elliott, Harriet W., Dean of Women ; Professor, Political Science 

England, Florence Olson, Instructor, Chemistry 

Eversmeyer, Bernice, Assistant Physician 



* On leave. 



170 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



Farinholt, Virginia C, Assistant Professor, Romance Languages 

Ferrell, Mary Lois, Associate Professor of Piano 

Fitzgerald, Mary, Assistant Professor, Education 

Fitzgerald, Ruth, Professor, Education 

Flintom, Margaret, Instructor, Education 

Forbes, Frances, Instructor, Home Economics 

Forney, E. J., Treasurer of the College 

Forney, Edna A., Assistant Treasurer 

Foster, Frances, Office of Alumnae Secretary 

Foust, Dr. J. I., President Emeritus 

Friedlaender, Marc, Associate Professor, English 

Funderburk, Annie Beam, Counselor; Instructor, Romance Languages 

Gangstad, Virginia, Instructor, Biology 

Gant, Elizabeth, Secretary, Office of the Dean of Music School 

Givler, John Paul, Professor, Biology 

Gill, Ruth, Assistant, Physics 

Gould, Mildred R., Associate Professor, English 

Gove, Anna M., (M.D.), Physician 

Grogan, lone H., Counselor; Instructor, Mathematics 

Gullander, Magnhilde, Associate Professor, History 

Gunter, Ruth, Assistant Professor, Education 

Haigler, Margaret, Office of the Registrar 

Hall, A. C, Professor, English 

Hall, Earl H., Professor of Botany 

Hamlett, Hermione, Instructor, Art 

Hannas, Ruth, Associate Professor, Music 

Hardre, Rene, Associate Professor, Romance Languages 

Harrell, Mary, Instructor, Commercial Department 

Harris, Mildred, Assistant Professor, Hygiene 

Harwood, Edith, Office of the Registrar 

Hasty, Mary, Secretary, Public Relations Department 

Hathaway, Elizabeth, Counselor 

Hawkins, Kathleen P., Secretary, Office of the Registrar 

Heffner, Madeline, Assistant, Biology 

Hege, Josephine, Instructor, History 

Henry, George E., Instructor, Music 

Henry, Sara, Secretary, Office of the Treasurer 

Highsmith, J. A., Professor, Psychology 

Hilford, Grace, Assistant, Sociology 

Holloway, Birdie H., Assistant Professor, Music 

Holman, Emma Linton, Reserve Librarian 

Hood, Marjorie, Head Circulation Department, Library 

Hooke, Malcolm, Professor, Romance Languages 

Hopkins, Anne Pleasants, Counselor 

Howell, Evelyn, Instructor, Home Economics 

Hoye, Anna Scott, Counselor ; Instructor, Physical Education 

Hughes, Annie H., Secretary, Office of the College Physician 

Hunter, Eugenia M., Supervisor of Kindergarten 

Hunter, Mrs. J. S., Counselor 

Hurley, L. B., Professor, English 

Hussey, Minnie M., Readers Adviser, Library 

Ingraham, Helen, Associate Professor, Biology 
Ivy, Gregory D., Professor, Art 

Jackson, Dr. W. C, Dean of Administration 
Jamison, Minnie L., Counselor 

Jernigan, Charlton C, Associate Professor, Classical Civilization 
Jester, Betty Brown, Manager, Book Store 
Johns, C. D., Professor, History 
Johnson, Glenn R., Professor, Sociology 

♦Joyce, George M., Assistant Professor, Commercial Department, Assistant 
Professor, Economics 

Keister, Albert S., Professor, Economics 

Kendrick, B. B., Professor, History 

Kimmel, Herbert, Associate Professor, Education 

Kohler, Charlotte, Instructor, English 

Kreimeier, Anna M., Assistant Professor, Education 

**Krug, Helen, Assistant Professor, Education 



* On leave 

** On leave second semester 



Faculty and Administrative Staff 171 



Laird, Jessie C, Associate Professor, Romance Languages 

Land, Betty Aiken, Assistant Professor, Education 

Largent, Vera, Associate Professor, History 

LaRochelle, Augustine, Associate Professor, Romance Languages 

Lathrop, Virginia Terrell, Publications 

Lattimore, May, Secretary, Office of the Dean of Women 

Lee, Mary Betty, Secretary, Office of the Principal of Curry 

Leslie, Edythe Orrell, Secretary, Department of Home Economics 

Lewis, Nancy Duke, Counselor 

Littlejohn, Vance, Instructor, Secretarial Science 

Love, Lila Belle, Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Lovings, Lillian Mebane, Mimeographing Department 

Lowrance, Adele Pitts, Instructor, Secretarial Science 

Lyle, Guy R., Professor, Librarian 

MacFadyen, Miriam, Associate Professor, Education 

McFadyen, Christiana, Instructor, History 

Mcllvaine, Dorothy S., Instructor, Art 

McLean, Jessie, Nurse, Infirmary 

Marley, Mary Ellis, Instructor, Commercial Department 

Martin, Evelyn, Counselor 

Martin, W. W., Professor, Psychology 

Martus, Ethel L., Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

Mehaffie, Harriett, Assistant Professor, Education 

Melvin, Eva Cox, Secretary, Department of Education 

Miller, Meta Helena, Professor, Romance Languages 

Mims, Mary Jane, Office of Registrar 

Minor, Alleine R., Associate Professor of Piano 

Moore, Mary Taylor, Professor, Registrar of the College 

More, Grace Van Dyke, Associate Professor of Public School Music 

Mossman, Mereb E., Associate Professor, Sociology 

Nauman, Harriet, Assistant Professor, Home Economics 

Newton, Mildred P., Secretary of Admissions ; Office of the Registrar 

Nunn, Mary, Secretary, Office of the Class Chairman 

Odgen, Marguerite C, Instructor, Education 
Oncley, Paul, Assistant Professor, Music 
Oncley, Alma Lissow, Instructor, Music 

Painter, James, Associate Professor, English 

Painter, Kathleen S., Instructor, English 

Park, Herbert "W., Instructor, Physical Education 

Parker, G. H., Assistant Professor, Secretarial Science 

Parker, Mary Welsh, Assistant, Chemistry ; Counselor 

Perecinic, Barbara A., Instructor, Commercial Department 

Peterson, Mollie Anne, Associate Professor, Art 

Petty, Mary M., Professor, Chemistry 

Pfaff, Eugene E., Instructor, History 

Pfaff, Kathleen, Instructor, History 

Phillips, C. W., Director of Public Relations Department 

Pickard, Helen L., Secretary, Office of Assistant Controller 

Playfoot, Viva M., Associate Professor, Home Economics 

Reger, Anna, Assistant Professor, Education ; Librarian Curry Training School 

Ritchie, Lawrence, Instructor, Biology 

Roberg, Frances, Assistant, Chemistry 

Rosa, Bess N., Assistant Professor, Home Economics 

Rowland, Wilmina, Director of Religious Activities 

Rowley, Abigail E., Associate Professor, English 

Sampson, Elizabeth, Head Cataloguer, Library 

Schaeffer, Florence, Professor, Chemistry 

Schoch, Caroline, Professor, German 

Shaftesbury, Archie D., Associate Professor of Zoology 

Shamburger, Anne, Instructor, Hygiene 

Shaver, Ruth, Instructor, Education 

Shelburne, Florence, Assistant Librarian, Curry Training School 

Shelden, Miriam A., Instructor, Physical Education 

Shields, Margaret V., Instructor, English 

Shivers, Lyda Gordon, Associate Prof essoi-, Sociology 

Sink, J. M., Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 



* On leave 

** On leave second semester 



172 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



Skelton, Robert M., Instructor, Art 

Skelton, Florence B., Instructor, Art 

Smith, John Aaron, Associate Professor, Education 

Smith, Martha E., Assistant Professor, Chemistry 

Smith, W. C, Professor, English 

fSnedden, Elizabeth, Instructor, Education 

Spruill, Patty, Assistant Professor, Secretarial Science 

Stanland, Marion E., Assistant, Psychology 

Staton, Cora Jane, Nurse, Infirmary 

Stephens, Harper, Instructor, Music 

Stewart, Mary Leath, Assistant Professor, Art 

Stout, Janette, Head of Postoffice 

Street, Madeleine B., Assistant Professor, Home Economics 

Strong, Cornelia, Professor, Mathematics 

Summerell, Jane, Associate Professor, English 

Surratt, Helen Kirk, Assistant, Home Economics 

Swanson, Mabel, Dietitian 

Tansil, Blanche, Associate Professor, Home Economics 

Tatum, Marion, Instructor, English 

Taylor, Katherine, Counselor; Assistant Professor, Romance Languages 

Taylor, W. R., Professor, English 

Teague, C. E. f Assistant Controller 

Tennent, Mary A., Assistant Registrar 

Thiel, Albert F., Associate Professor of Botany 

Thompson, George, Professor of Organ 

Thompson, Henrietta, Instructor, Physical Education 

Thrush, Helen, Assistant Professor, Art 

Tiedeman, John A., Assistant Professor, Physics 

Tillett, Nettie Sue, Associate Professor, English 

*Tisdale, Hope, Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

Trumper, Virginia, In charge of Periodicals, Library 

Tuck, Lena, Nurse, Infirmary 

Underwood, George A., Professor, Romance Languages 

von Western, Klasine E., Instructor, German 






Warfield, Calvin N., Professor, Physics 

Watkins, Emily Holmes, Associate Professor, Mathematics 

White, Christine, Assistant Professor, Physical Education 

Wilkerson, Treva, Circulation Department, Library 

Wilkins, Kate, Instructor, Chemistry 

Williams, Maude, Associate Professor of Physiology 

Williams, Sue Vernon, Reference Librarian, Library 

Wilson, George P., Professor, English 

*Yates, Elizabeth, Secretary, Office of the Dean of Administration 



* On leave 

t Second Bemester 



ENROLLMENT SUMMARY, 1939-1940 



Senior Class 418 

Junior Class 416 

Sophomore Class 484 

Freshman Class 729 

Commercial Class 148 

Special Students 66 

Total Regular Session 2,261 

Summer Session 1939 621 

Total number enrolled 2,882 

Number counted twice 251 

2,631 

Training School Enrollment 391 

Training School Enrollment Summer Session 1939 114 

Kindergarten and Nursery Sehool — 87 

642 

Total Enrollment 1S39-40 3,173 



Student List 173 

LIST OF STUDENTS 

SENIOR CLASS 

Abernethy, Margaret, A.B Elkin, Surry 

Adams, Martha, A.B Gastonia, Gaston 

Alexander, Mary Neil, B.S.H.E Matthews, R. 1, Mecklenburg 

Allen, Jane, B.S.H.E Troy, Montgomery 

Ambrose, Virginia, B.S.H.E Conway, S. C. 

Ammons, Bertha Mae, A.B Rowland, Robeson 

Anderson, Blanche, B.S.P.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Anderson, Rebecca, A.B Snow Hill, Greene 

Anderson, Sibyl, B.S.H.E Clyde, Haywood 

Andrews, Alice, B.S.S.A Mt. Gilead, R. 1, Richmond 

Armentrout, Shirley, A.B Goldsboro, Wayne 

Armstrong, Jeanelle, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Ashby, Letitia, A.B Mt. Airy, Surry 

Austin, Sarah, A.B Monroe, R. 2, Union 

Avery, Emma Sharpe, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Axley, Ellen, A.B Murphy, Cherokee 

Ayscue, Evelyn, B.S.H.E Kittrell, Franklin 

Baer, Rosa, B.S.S.A Dunn,- Harnett 

Baker, Margie, B.S.H.E Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 

Barefoot, Anna Jean, A.B Canton, Haywood 

Barksdale, Anne, B.S.S.A Saluda, Polk 

Barksdale, Beverly, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Barnes, Lois, A.B Wallingford, R. 1, Connecticut 

Barnwell, Ruth, B.S.S.A Edneyville, Henderson 

Barringer, Frances, A.B Concord, Cabarrus 

Bell, Dorothy, A.B Westfield, N. J. 

Bell, Eleanor H., A.B Mooresville, Iredell 

Benton, Nell, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Bergen, Alice, B.S.S.A Oxford, Granville 

Black, Kate, B.S.S.A Reidsville, Rockingham 

Black, Margaret, A.B Greensboro, Guilfrod 

Blanchard, Alice, A.B Hobbsville, Gates 

Blanchard, Edith, B.S.H.E Gatesville, Gates 

Boger, Virginia, B.S.S.A Albemarle, Stanly 

Boles, Pauline, A.B Cycle, Yadkin 

Brady, Hilda, A.B Franklinville, Randolph 

Briggs, Olive, B.S.S.A Burnsville, Yancey 

Bright, Rachel, A.B New Hill, Wake 

Britten, Kathryn, A.B Kinston, Lenoir 

Brock, Dorothy, A.B Elizabeth City, Pasquotank 

Brooks, Geraldine F., B.S.H.E Roxboro, Person 

Brooks, Lucille, B.S.S.A Tarboro, Edgecombe 

Brothers, Dorothy, A.B LaGrange, Lenoir 

Brown, Adelaide, B.S.S.A Asheville, Buncombe 

Brown, Barbara, A.B Brookline, Mass. 

Brown, Dorothy A., A.B Salisbury, Rowan 

Brown, Evelyn, A.B Rocky Mount, R. 2, Edgecombe 

Brown, Katherine, A.B Concord, R. 4, Cabarrus 

Brown, Martha K., B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Brown, Mary Betty, A.B. Taylorsville, Alexander 

Browne, Nancy, A.B Wilson, Wilson 

Budd, Mary Dell, B.S.S.A Siler City, Chatham 

Burnett, Anne, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount, Nash 

Burns, Betty, B.S.S.A Fairmont, Robeson 

Butler, Doris, A.B Clinton, Sampson 

Caddell, Mabel, B.S.S.A Hoffman, Richmond 

Carman, Joy, A.B Point Pleasant, N. J. 

Caroon, Elicia, B.S.S.A New Bern, Craven 

Caroon, Inez, A.B Kinston, Lenoir 

Carson, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Statesville, Iredell 

Cashwell, Eleanor, A.B Gastonia, Gaston 

Chadwick, Ruth, B.S.S.A New Bern, Craven 

Chaffee, Margaret, A.B Morganton, Burke 

Chaffin, Helen, A.B Lillington, Harnett 

Chambliss, Joyce, A.B Reidsville, Rockingham 

Chamness, Daisy, B.S.P.E Bennettsville, S. C. 

Chance, Virginia, B.S.S.A Hendersonville, Henderson 

Changaris, Christina, A.B Durham, Durham 



174 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

SENIOR CLASS— Continued 

Church, Elizabeth, A.B Roaring River, Wilkes 

Clein, Bernice, B.S.S.A. Greensboro, Guilford 

Clutts, Betty, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Cochran, Mary Ruth, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount, Nash 

Cohen, Helen, B.S.P.E Port Chester, N. Y. 

Coleman, Mildred, B.S.S.A Norlina, Warren 

Coley, Dorothy, B.S.P.E Raleigh, R. 5, Wake 

Conly, Josephine, B.S.S.A Wilson, Wilson 

Connor, Virginia, B.S.S.A Asheville, Buncombe 

Coogan, Alice, B.S.S.A Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Cooney, Jean, B.S.S.A Trenton, N. J. 

Cowles, Roberta, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Cox, Marian, B.S.M Winterville, Pitt 

Crabtree, Gertrude, B.S.H.E Bahama, R. 3, Durham 

Craft, Louise, B.S.H.E Pittsboro, R. 2, Chatham 

Craver, Virginia, A.B Lexington, R. 4, Davidson 

Crook, Carolyn, A.B East Haddon, Conn. 

Croom, Leah, B.S H.E Wilmington, New Hanover 

Crotty, Ruth, B.A Brooklyn, New York 

Crowell, Rebecca, B.S.H.E Richfield, Stanly 

Cunningham, Helen, B.S.M Monroe, Union 

Daniel, Edith, A.B Elm City, Wilson 

Daniel, Naomi, A.B Roxboro, R. 3, Person 

Davidson, May, B.S.S.A Huntersville, R. 1, Mecklenburg 

Davis, Rebecca, A.B Dunn, Harnett 

Davison, Betsy, B.S.M Leaksville, Rockingham 

Dawson, Katherine, B.S.H.E New Bern, R. 2, Craven 

Day, Mary E., B.S.S.A Wilmington, New Hanover 

Dennis, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Loch, Arbour, N. J. 

Dewey, Jean, B.S.S.A Goldsboro, Wayne 

Dickson, Carmelita, A.B Boothbay Harbor, Maine 

Dimmette, Marie, A.B Gastonia, Gaston 

Dowd, Carolyn, B.S.H.E Carthage, Moore 

Durham, Celia, A.B Chapel Hill, Orange 

Edwards, Frances Louise, B.S.S.A Asheville, Buncombe 

Efird, Wilhelmina, B.S.S.A Albemarle, Stanly 

Efland, Maxine, B.S.S.A Efland, Orange 

Eller, Ruth, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Ellington, Mary Osbourne, A.B Rocky Mount, Nash 

Ellis, Elizabeth, A.B Goldston, Chatham 

Ellis, Grace, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Ennis, Phoebe, A.B Raleigh, Wake 

Faison, Margery, A.B Chester, Pennsylvania 

Finklehoffe, Maralyn, A.B Springfield, Mass. 

Fisher, Marian E., B.S.H.E Northampton, Mass. 

Forester, Helen, A.B Birmingham, Mich. 

Fox, Ann, A.B Staley, Randolph 

Francis, Virginia, B.S.H.E King, Stokes 

Fretz, Ruth, A.B Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Frick, Pearle, A.B Gold Hill, Rowan 

Frye, Mary Ruth, A.B Carthage, R. 1, Moore 

Fuller, Julia, B.S.P.E Franklinton, Franklin 

Fuller, Kathryn, B.S.M Spruce Pine, Mitchell 

Futrell, Mary Frances, B.S.S.A Nashville, Nash 

Gallagher, Marjorie, A.B Charleston, S. C. 

Galloway, Marion, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Gardner, Virginia, B.S.S.A Murfreesboro, Hertford 

Gaylord, Virginia, A.B. Pantego, Beaufort 

Gentles, Avril, A.B Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Gilbert, Rebekah, A.B Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Gillam, Bessie A., A.B ..Morganton, Burke 

Gilliam, VeLora, B.S.H.E Elon College, R. 1, Alamance 

Gillmore, Ruth, B.S.P.E ,W, alpole ^ Mas Zl 

Godbey, Maurine, B.S.H.E Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Goodrum, Emily, B.S.S.A Davidson Mecklenburg 

Gordon, Ruth, A.B Pittsboro, Chatham 

Gore, Josephine, B.S.P.E Tabor City, Columbus 

Gravely, Lulu, A.B ■■■-■■■; Rocky Mount, Nash 

Greeson, Evelyn, B.S.S.A Burlington, R. 4, Alamance 

Griffin, Ellen, B.S.P.E Dubuque, Iowa 



Student List 175 

SENIOR CLASS— Continued 

Griffin, Katharine, A.B Sanford, Lee 

Grimes, Gertrude, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Groner, Janet, A.B South Orange, N. J. 

Guyer, Lois, A.B Haddon Heights, N. J. 

Hall, Celia, B.S.S.A New Bern, Craven 

Hall, Frances, A.B Zebulon, Wake 

Hall, Sarah, B.S.H.E Mt. Ulla, Rowan 

Ham. Nancy, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Hamlett, Lettie, A.B Thomasville, Davidson 

Hammond, Angela, A.B Cranford, N. J. 

Hammond, Thelma, A.B Maplewood, N. J. 

Hamrick, Edith, A.B Shelby, R. 3, Cleveland 

Hardee, Roberta, A.B Durham, Durham 

Harding, Grace, B.S.S.A Washington, Beaufort 

Hardwicke, Pauline, A.B Wake Forest, Wake 

Harry, Jeanette, B.S.S.A Grover, Cleveland 

Hartsook, Jean, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Harvey, Nettie, B.S.H.E Moncks Corner, S. C. 

Harward, Frances, B.S.M Apex, Wake 

Haugh, Mildred, B.S.H.E Short Hills, N. J. 

Hawkins, Mary Frances, B.S.H.E Waynesboro, Va. 

Hayman, Beatrice, B.S.S.A Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Heffner, Mary Miller, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Hege, Mary Ellen, A.B Lexington, R. 1, Davidson 

Hemphill, Emma, A.B Greensboro, R. 4, Guilford 

Herbert, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Herring, Eloise, B.S.H.E Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Herring, Jane, A.B Clinton, Sampson 

Higgins, Mary, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Hightower, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Wadesboro, Anson 

Hollowell, Rebecca, A.B Edenton, Chowan 

Holman, Kathryn, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Holmes, Elizabeth, B.S.M Leaksville, Rockingham 

Horner, Eleanor, A.B Burlington, Alamance 

Horton, Blanche, B.S.S.A Wendell, Wake 

Howard, Betsy, A.B. Raleigh, Wake 

Howard, Carol, B.S.S.A St. Pauls, Robeson 

Howard, Elinor, B.S.S.A Concord, Cabarrus 

Howard, Virginia, B.S.S.A Asheville, Buncombe 

Howell, Virginia, A.B Morganton, Burke 

Howerton, Helen, AB Asheville, Buncombe 

Hudspeth, Pauline, B.S.H.E Yadkinville, Yadkin 

Huff, Barbara, B.S.H.E Plainfield, N. J. 

Huff, Margaret, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Hughes, Claire, B.S.S.A Wilmington, New Hanover 

Hughes, Mary Louise, B.S.S.A Elizabeth City, Pasquotank 

Hunnicutt, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Asheville, Buncombe 

Hunt, Barbara, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Hunter, Virginia, B.S.H.E Petersburg, Va. 

Huntington, Ann, A.B Elmira, N. Y. 

Ingram, Frances, B.S.S.A Norwood, Stanly 

Irwin, Patricia, A.B Bradley Beach, N. J. 

Jackson, Henrietta, B.S.H.E Weeksville, Pasquotank 

Johnson, Lillian, A.B Holly Springs, Wake 

Johnston, Beatrice, B.S.M Concord, Cabarrus 

Joines, Faye, A.B Sparta, Alleghany 

Jones, Grant, A.B Wilmington, New Hanover 

Jones, Patsy, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Joyner, Sara, B.S.S.A Wilson, R. 2, Wilson 

Kanipe, Dorothy, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Kearns, Mary Wade, B.S.S.A Pleasant Garden, Guilford 

Keller, Sara, A.B Gastonia, Gaston 

Kellogg, Josephine, B.S.S.A Wilson, Wilson 

Kennette, Margaret, B.S.P.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Kerbaugh, Bessie Rhodes, A.B North Wilkesboro, Wilkes 

King, Eunice, A.B Raleigh, Wake 

King, Frances, A.B Hendersonville, Henderson 

Kinlaw, Dora, B.S.H.E Lumberton, Robeson 

Kinlaw, Dovie, B.S.H.E Lumberton, Robeson 

Kinsey, Eugenia, B.S.S.A Columbia, S. C. 



176 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

SENIOR CLASS— Continued 

Kirstein, Alma, B.S.M Asheville, Buncombe 

Klein, Jennie, A.B Annapolis, Md. 

Knox, Annie Lee, B.S.H.E Bear Poplar, Rowan 

Koehler, Dorothy, A.B Albion, Pa. 

Koonce, Marguerite, B.S.H.E Raleigh, Wake 

Krug, Natalie, A.B Lexington, Davidson 

Land, Jessie, B.S.S.A New Bern, Craven 

Lassiter, Mary Rieves, B.S.S.A Madison, Rockingham 

Latham, Ethel, A.B Mocksville, Davie 

Leary, Elizabeth, A.B Washington, Beaufort 

Lee, Elizabeth, A.B Fallston, Cleveland 

Lively, Mary Louise Gill, A.B Laurinburg, Scotland 

Lloyd, Joan, A.B Lakewood, Ohio 

Lohr, Mabel, A.B Lexington, R. 6, Davidson 

Londner, Esther, B.S.S.A Marion, McDowell 

Lovell, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Leonia, N. J. 

Loving, Grace, A.B Drakes Branch, Va. 

Lukens, Margaret, A.B Norfolk, Va. 

McBane, Margaret, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

McBride, Rebekah, A.B Marshville, Union 

McBryde, Kathleen, B.S.S.A Raeford, Hoke 

McBryde, Mary E., B.S.S.A Raeford, Hoke 

McCollum, Marguerite, A.B Wentworth, Rockingham 

McDowell, Alice, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

McFadyen, Lena, B.S.P.E Raeford, Hoke 

Mcintosh, Mary Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Raleigh, Wake 

McLean, Martha, B.S.P.E Rockingham, Richmond 

McLean, Rosemary, B.S.H.E Salisbury, Rowan 

McNeill, Emma King, B.S.H.E Lumberton, Robeson 

McNeill, Marian, B.S.S.A Rowland, Robeson 

Mandell, Muriel, A.B Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Maness, Madith, A.B Hemp, R. 1, Moore 

Marks, Dorothy, A.B Tillery, Halifax 

Marks, Jennie Sewell, B.S.H.E Tillery, Halifax 

Martin, Martha Lee, A.B Marion, McDowell 

Mason, Beulah, A.B Bath, Beaufort 

Matlock, Cornelia, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Matthews, Dorothea, B.S.S.A Halifax, Halifax 

Matthews, Louise, A.B Rocky Mount, Nash 

Maxwell, Louise, A.B Davidson, Mecklenburg 

Maynard, Margaret, A.B Belmont, Gaston 

Mayo, Laura Love, B.S.S.A Hobucken, Pamlico 

Meixell, Anna, A.B Brevard, R. 2, Transylvania 

Meroney, Louise Greensboro, R. 1, Guilford 

Meyers, Elaine, A.B Plainfield, N. J. 

Moore, Mary Byrd, A.B Spray, Rockingham 

Moore, Maxie, B.S.H.E Greensboro, R. 2, Guilford 

Moore, Nell, B.S.H.E Wilmington, New Hanover 

Morgan, Elizabeth, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Morgan, Ruby, B.S.H.E Shelby, Cleveland 

Morris, Editha, A.B Tarboro, Edgecombe 

Morrison, Mary Graham, B.S.S.A Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Moser, Margaret L., A.B Greensboro, R. 4, Guilford 

Moser, Mary Sue, B.S.H.E Monroe, R. 5, Union 

Moss, Lynette, A.B Wilson, Wilson 

Munday, Sue, B.S.S.A Taylorsville, Alexander 

Murphy, Marie, A.B Southern Pines, Moore 

Muse, Laura, A.B Laurinburg, R. 2, Scotland 

Nahikian, Satenik, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

New, Doris, A.B King, Stokes 

Newell, Lucy, A.B Franklinton, Franklin 

Newsome, Mary, B.S.S.A Wake Forest, Wake 

Noel, Jean, B.S.S.A Olivia, Harnett 

Norwood, Betty, A.B Mt. Airy, Surry 

Okell, Marion, A.B Plainfield, N. J. 

Oncley, Ruth, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Outlaw, Eunice, B.S.H.E Zebulon, Wake 

Overman, Mary, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 



Student List 177 



SENIOR CLASS— Continued 



Page, Helen, A.B. Raleigh, Wake 

Palmer, Isabel, A.B. Bayside, L. I., N. Y. 

Palmer, Ruth, B.S.S.A Arlington, N. J. 

Pardo, Sara, B.S.M Havana, Cuba 

Pardue, Clara, B.S.S.A Wallburg, Davidson 

Parker, Oma, A.B Gates, Gates 

Penland, Pauline, B.S.H.E Hayesville, R. 1, Clay 

Person, Anne, B.S.H.E Littleton, Warren 

Peterson, Jeanette, B.S.S.A Smithfield, Johnston 

Pettigrew, Elizabeth, A.B Florence, S. C. 

Pike, Anne, B.S.S.A Derby Line, Vt. 

Plonk, Martha, B.S.H.E Kings Mountain, Cleveland 

Porter, Lois, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Powell, Valerie, B.S.P.E Tamaqua, Pa. 

Prine, Alta, A.B Westfield, N. J. 

Pruden, Marilyn, A.B Severn, Northampton 

Pully, Rose, A.B Kinston, Lenoir 

Purdy, Roberta, A.B Ossining, N. Y. 

Qua, Muriel, A.B Northampton, Mass. 

Quinn, Elizabeth, A.B Durham, Durham 

Railey, Anna Stone, B.S.P.E Como, Hertford 

Ramsey, Frances Louise A,.B Statesville, Iredell 

Randle, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Kings Mountain, Cleveland 

Rappoport, Rosalie, A.B Ramsey, N. J. 

Rash, Jane, B.S.M. LaCrosse, Va. 

Reed, Nola, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Reynolds, Helen, A.B Raleigh, Wake 

Rice, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Candler, Buncombe 

Richardson, Edna Earle, A.B Lakeview, Moore 

Richardson, Helen Sue, B.S.H.E Troy, Montgomery 

Richardson, Sarah, B. S. H. E Mineral Springs, Union 

Riddick, Mary Louise, B.S.S.A Scotland Neck, Halifax 

Riddick, Nell, B.S.S.A Gatesville, Gates 

Rimmer, Katherine, A.B Statesville, R. 3, Iredell 

Rives, Mary Irma, A.B Goldston, Chatham 

Roberson, Emeline, A.B Robersonville, Martin 

Rogers, Geraldine L., B.S.S.A Albemarle, Stanly 

Rose, Annie Lea, B.S.M Shelby, Cleveland 

Ross, Eleanor, A.B. Norwood, R. 1, Stanly 

Rouse, Joyce, B.S.H.E Fairmont, Robeson 

Russell, Ruth, B.S.H.E Bryson City, Swain 

Saltman, Kathlyn, A.B.M Bridgeport, Conn. 

Sanford, Agnes, A.B Mocksville, Davie 

Schaefer, Sophie, B.S.S.A Westfield, N. J. 

Schultz, Madelyn, B.S.M, Tremont, Pa. 

Schuster, Helene, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Scott, Cora Lea, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Seawell, Sara, A.B Rockingham, Richmond 

Shafer, Melba, A.B. Memphis, Tenn. 

Sharpe, Carrie Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Reidsville, Rockingham 

Sheahen, Lauretta, A.B Ontario, N. Y. 

Sherard, Adell, B.S.H.E Goldsboro, Wayne 

Shermer, Lena Sue, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Shoaf, Arriwona, B.S.H.E Lexington, Davidson 

Shoaf, Charlotte, B.S.S.A Lexington, R. 5, Davidson 

Shook, Anne, A.B Tarboro, Edgecombe 

Sides, Mary Alice, A,B Statesville, Iredell 

Siler, Emily, A.B Waynesville, Haywood 

Simmons, Mary B., B.S.H.E Yadkinville, R. 2, Yadkin 

Simmons, Mary S., B.S.S.A Pilot Mountain, Surry 

Simpson, Adele, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Sircom, Alice, A.B New York, N. Y. 

Sisk, Prather, A.B Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Sloan, Frances, B.S.M Greensboro, Guilford 

Smith, Annie Blanche, A.B Francisco, Stokes 

Smith, H. Eloise, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Smith, Erma, B.S.S.A Raleigh, Wake 

Smith, Evelyn B., A.B Old Greenwich, Conn. 

Smith, Mamie Grace, B.S.H.E Kinston, Lenoir 

Smith, Margaret I., B.S.M Wake Forest, Wake 

Snow, Theresa, A.B Kernersville, Forsyth 



178 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



SENIOR CLASS— Continued 

Snoden, Madeleine, B.S.P.E Washington, D. C. 

Soles, Kathleen, A.B Whiteville, Columbus 

Spratt, Mary Louise, A.B Charlotte, R. 3, Mecklenburg 

Spruill, Mary Jane, A.B Windsor, Bertie 

Spruill, Virginia, B.S.S.A Plymouth, Washington 

Stanton, Catherine, B.S.M Wilmington, New Hanover 

Staton, Maude, A.B Hendersonville, Henderson 

Sterling, Virginia, B.S.S.A Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Stevens, Altha, A.B Baltimore, Md. 

Stevenson, Evelyn, A.B Bennettsville, S. C. 

Strauss, Anita, B.S.P.E Hillsdale, N. Y. 

Stringfield, Thomasine, A.B Waynesville, Haywood 

Suiter, Alice, B.S.P.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Suitt, Edna, B.S.H.E Hillsboro, R. 3, Orange 

Summers, Ruth, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Sutton, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Bordentown, N. J. 

Swanson, Marjorie, A.B Brockton, Mass. 

Sweeney, Sue, A.B Marion, McDowell 

Sykes, Pearl Lindley, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Talley, Rebecca, A.B Lewiston, Bertie 

Taylor, Margaret M., A.B Townsville, Vance 

Thomas, Eleanor, A.B Chadbourn, Columbus 

Thompson, Elise, A.B Chadbourn, Columbus 

Thornton, Janette B..S.S.A Dunn, Harnett 

Tillinghast, Anne W., A.B Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Tingle, Nellie, B.S.H.E Asheville, Buncombe 

Toler, Margaret, B.S.H.E Rocky Mount, Nash 

Tomlinson, Dorothea, A.B Wilson, Wilson 

Tomlinson, Hildred, A.B Wilson, Wilson 

Torrence, Matoaka, B.S.P.E Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Trexler, Willie, A.B Salisbury, R. 5, Rowan 

Turner, Edith, A.B Interlaken, N. J. 

Turner, Mary Anne, A.B Waynesville, Haywood 

Twitty, Bess, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Tysinger, Dorothy, A.B. Lexington, R. 6, Davidson 

Usher, Alma, A.B Newton Grove, Sampson 

Walker, Carrie, A.B Burlington, Alamance 

Warren, Christine, B.S.H.E Collettsville, Caldwell 

Warren, Florence, B.S.S.A Sparta, Alleghany 

Washington, Charlie, A.B Stem, Granville 

Weeks, Mary Alice, B.S.H.E Raleigh, Wake 

Weinger, Ruth, B.S.P.E Peekskill, N. Y. 

Welch, Eloise, B.S.S.A Thomasville, Davidson 

White, Elizabeth, A.B Durham, Durham 

White, Emily K., B.S.P.E Greensboro, Guilford 

White, Genevieve, A.B Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Whitley, Ethel, A.B Marshville, Union 

Whitley, Helen, B.S.S A Enfield, Halifax 

Whitley, Kathryn, A.B Enfield, Halifax 

Williams, Audrey, B.S.S.A Baldwin, N. Y. 

Williams, Olive, B.S.H.E Statesville, R. 5, Iredell 

Williamson, Myrtle, A.B Kenly, R. 1, Johnston 

Wimbish, Christine, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Winslow, Packy, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Wise, Betty, A.B Durham, Durham 

Wolfson, Minna, A.B Springfield, Mass. 

Woody, Sarah, B.S.S.A Burnsville, Yancey 

Worthington, Nannie Lee, A.B Winterville, Pitt 

Wrenn, Kathryn, A.B Siler City, Chatham 

Wright, Catherine, B.S.H.E Henderson, R. 4, Vance 

Wright, Glenmore, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Wunsch, Evelyn, B.S.P.E Hull, Mass. 

Wyatte, Margaret, A.B Mebane, Alamance 

Wygant, Helen, A.B Baltimore, Md. 

Yates, Nancy, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Yelton, Martha, B.S.S.A Spindale, Rutherford 

Zimmerman, Jane, A.B Clemmons, Davidson 

Zimmerman, Theresa, B.S.S.A Aberdeen, Moore 



Student List 179 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Abernethy, Janice, B.S.S.A Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Alexander, Louise, A.B Huntersville, Mecklenburg 

Anderson, Mary, B.S.H.E Guilford College, R. 1, Guilford 

Anderson, Vallie, B.S.P.E Gastonia, Gaston 

Aycock, Grace, A.B Princeton, Johnston 

Ayers, Marguerite, B.S.S.A Oak City, Martin 

Ayres, Doris, B.S.S.A Pompton Lakes, N. J. 

Bain, Kathryn, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Baise, Bettie, A.B Reidsville, R. 5, Rockingham 

Baker, Doris, A.B Holly Springs, Wake 

Banks, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Trenton, Jones 

Barber, Kathleen, B.S.H.E Burlington, Alamance 

Barnes, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Wallingford, Conn. 

Bartlett, Dorothy, A.B Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Beard, Sarah, A.B Atkinson, Pender 

Beasley, Carrie Lee, B.S.M Four Oaks, R. 1, Johnston 

Beckerdite, Faye, A.B Winston-Salem, R. 5, Davidson 

Bell, Eleanor W., A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Benson, Doris, B.S.S.A Nashville, Nash 

Beshears, Leeida, B.S.S.A Franklin, Macon 

Billings, Alice, B.S.H.E Dockery, Wilkes 

Binford, Mary Margaret, B.S.P.E Guilford College, Guilford 

Bishop, Sue, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Black, Emma Neale, B.S.M Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Blackwood, Rama. A.B Jonesville, Yadkin 

Blanton, Nancy, B.S.P.E Ellenboro, Rutherford 

Bluethenthal, Joan, A.B Wilmington, New Hanover 

Boet, Johanna, A.B. Castle Hayne, New Hanover 

Booker, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Bowman, Linda, B.S.S.A Taylorsville, Alexander 

Boyd, Ethel, B.S.H.E Monroe, R. 3, Union 

Boyette, Anne, B.S.H.E Smi.thfield, Johnston 

Braswell, Annie, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount, Nash 

Braswell, Clarene, B.S.H.E Monroe, R. 3, Union 

Brewer, Alma, A.B Polkton, R. 2, Anson 

Brewster, Nancy Ann, A.B Washington, D. C. 

Bridges, Annette, A. B Raleigh, Wake 

Brisson, Louise, A.B Lumberton, Robeson 

Brown, Dorothy May, B.S.H.E Tarboro, Edgecombe 

Bullock, Judith, A.B Red Springs, Robeson 

Burden, Luella, A.B Aulander, Bertie 

Burke, Doris, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Burns, Pauline, B.S.H.E Newton, Catawba 

Burrell, Arpha, A.B Tryon, Polk 

Butler, Anne, B.S.S.A Durham, Durham 

Butler, Dorothy, A.B Roseboro, Sampson 

Butler, Rebecca, A.B St. Pauls, Robeson 

Calder, Alice, A.B Wilmington, New Hanover 

Caldwell, Anna, A.B Carthage, Moore 

Calvert, Florence, A.B Black Mountain, Buncombe 

Campbell, Lucille, B.S.S.A Harmony, Iredell 

Carlton, Katherine, B.S.H.E Warsaw, Duplin 

Carpenter, Catherine M., B.S.H.E Gastonia, Gaston 

Carter, Catherine, B.S.H.E Asheville, Buncombe 

Case, Evelyn, A.B Pantego, Beaufort 

Cashion, Imogene, A.B Hickory, Catawba 

Cecil, Jennie, A.B Lexington, Davidson 

Chandler, Annie Lou, A.B Goldsboro, Wayne 

Chapman, Virginia, A.B Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Charnock, Martha, B.S.P.E Asheville, Buncombe 

Cheek, Mary Ann, B.S.H.E Rockwell, Rowan 

Church, Jean, A.B New Bern, Craven 

Clark, Evelyn, B.S.H.E Hendersonville, R. 2, Henderson 

Clegg, Bobbie Lee, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Cline, Laura, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Cline, Marybelle, A.B Lincolnton, Lincoln 

Cobb, Sallie, B.S.S.A Pinetops, Edgecombe 

Cobler, Hazel, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Coit, Margaret, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Colerider, Sara Virginia, A.B Hickory, Catawba 

Cook, Jane, A.B Moorestown, N. J. 

Cooke, Frances T., A.B Franklinton, Franklin 



180 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

JUNIOR CLASS— Continued 

Cooper, Mary E., B.S.H.E Dobson, Surry 

Cowan, Ruth, B.S.S.A Chadbourn, Columbus 

Cox, Carrie, B.S.H.E Cove City, Craven 

Cox, Eleanor, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Cox, Evelyn, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Craig, Muriel, B.S.S.A Newark, N. J. 

Cross, Rosemary, A.B Oceanport, N. J. 

Crouch, Ruth, A.B. Stony Point, Alexander 

Dail, Guyla, B.S.S.A Winterville, Pitt 

Daniel, Frances, A.B Henderson, Vance 

Davis, Mary Delia, B.S.H.E Warrenton, Warren 

Davis, Valda, A.B Oxford, Granville 

Day, Nettie, B.S.H.E Oxford, Granville 

Dean, Helena, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Diamond, Mary, B.S.S.A Washington, Beaufort 

Dickinson, Eliza, B.S.P.E Wilson, Wilson 

Dickson, Margaret, A.B High Point, Guilford 

Dillard, Caroline, B.S.S.A Candler, Buncombe 

Dixon, Dorothy C, A.B Brown Summit, Guilford 

Dodson, Audree Faye, A.B Greensboi-o, R. 2, Guilford 

Douglas, Margaret, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Douglas, Pauline, A.B High Point, Guilford 

Douglass, Ella, A.B Raleigh, Wake 

Dubois, Rita, B.S.H.E Raleigh, Wake 

Echols, Eleanor, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Edwards, Frances Lloyd, B.S.S.A Seaboard, Northampton 

Edwards, Mary Louise, B.S.P.E Kinston, R. 1, Lenoir 

Egerton, Virginia, A.B Mill Spring, Polk 

Elliott, Jean, A.B Woodland, Northampton 

Evans, Kathryn, B.S.H.E Murfreesboro, Hertford 

Falls, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Shelby, Cleveland 

Farlow, Mary, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Farnsworth, Virginia, A.B Horse Shoe, Henderson 

Faulconer, Jean, B.S.M Greensboro, Guilford 

Feldman, Joan, B.S.H.E West Hartford, Conn. 

Fish, Rachel, B.S.S.A Angier, Harnett 

Flanagan, Nancy, A.B Greenville, Pitt 

Fleet, Sarah, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Fondren, Helen, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Fordham, Margaret, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Francis, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Waynesville, Haywood 

Gaddy, Christine, B.S.H.E Rocky Mount, Nash 

Gamble, Mary Emma, B.S.S.A Davidson, Mecklenburg 

Gandy, Thomas Ena, A.B Wadesboro, R. 1, Anson 

Gannon, Shirley, B.S.H.E Charlotte, R. 1, Mecklenburg 

Gay, Gwendolyn, B.S.M Fitchburg, Mass. 

Gentry, Sara, B.S.S.A Lillington, Harnett 

Gibbs, Ida, B.S.H.E Columbus, Tyrrell 

Gibson, Edna, B.S.P.E Laurinburg, Scotland 

Gilchrist, Rachel, A.B Brown Summit, R. 1, Guilford 

Gill, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Henderson, R. 1, Vance 

Gillett, Jane, A.B Washington, D. C. 

Gilliam, Bess F., B.S.H.E Elon College, Alamance 

Godbey, Louise, B.S.M Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Goodman, Edith, B.S.M Miami, Fla. 

Gravely, Nellie, B.S.S.A Woodsdale, Person 

Gray, Ida, A.B Durham, Durham 

Grayson, Katy Ruth, A.B Forest City, Rutherford 

Griffin, Glennie, B.S.H.E Wingate, Union 

Griffin, Lucile, B.S.H.E Sanford, Lee 

Gross, Doris, B.S.H.E West Hartford, Conn. 

Groverman, Frances, A.B Georgetown, S. C. 

Groves, Edna, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Gunn, Edna, A.B Reidsville, R. 4, Rockingham 

Gunn, Nelvin, A.B Reidsville, R. 4, Rockingham 

Hall, Martha, B.S.S.A Wilmington, New Hanover 

Hall, Ruth F., A.B Roseboro, Sampson 

Halstead, Virginia, B.S.S.A Kearny, N. J. 

Hamilton, Martha, A.B Monroe, Union 



Student List 181 

JUNIOR CLASS— Continued 

Hammond, Peggy, A.B Cranford, N. J. 

Hamrick, Katherine, A.B Boiling Springs, Cleveland 

Hamrick, Sadie, A.B Shelby, R. 3, Cleveland 

Hardesty, Virginia, B.S.S.A Morehead City, Carteret 

Hargett, Mary Elizabeth, B.S.S.A. Matthews, Mecklenburg 

Harrelson, Martha Jane, B.S.S.A Cherryville, R. 1, Lincoln 

Harris, Annie Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Conetoe, Edgecombe 

Harris, Martha L., A.B Oriental, Pamlico 

Harris, Mildred, B.S.S.A Wingate, Union 

Harrison, Sara E., B.S.P.E Mount Airy, Surry 

Hatcher, Anna Mae, A.B High Point, Guilford 

Hatsell, Audrey, A.B Jacksonville, Onslow 

Heaton, Doris, A.B Andrews, Cherokee 

Heine, Sigrid, B.S.S.A Mt. Clemens, Mich. 

Helsabeck, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Rural Hall, Forsyth 

Hennessee, Olive, A.B Pinehurst, Moore 

Henry, Lois, A.B Washington, D. C. 

Heyman, Jeanette, A.B Savannah, Ga. 

Higgins, Belva, B.S.H.E Trenton, Jones 

Hill, Clara, A.B. Smithfield, R. 2, Johnston 

Hinshaw, Edith, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Hodges, Jean, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Hodgin, Anne, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Holland, Hope, A.B Marion, McDowell 

Holleman, Virginia, B.S.S.A Jacksonville, Onslow 

Hook, Elizabeth, A.B Muncie, Ind. 

Hopkins, Edith, B.S.S.A Brown Summit, Guilford 

Home, Evelyn, B.S.H.E Wilmington, New Hanover 

House, Ruth, B.S.H.E Hobgood, Halifax 

Houston, Mary Elizabeth, A.B. Wilmington, New Hanover 

Howard, Mildred, A.B Buie's Creek, Harnett 

Howell, Carolyn, A.B Smithfield, Johnston 

Howell, Evelyn M., B.S.S.A Gastonia, Gaston 

Hoyle, Mary L., A.B Fallston, Cleveland 

Huff, Polly, B.S.S.A Mars Hill, Madison 

Hunter, Clara, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Hunter, Susan Jane, B.S.H.E Tobaccoville, Forsyth 

Ingram, Marguerette, A.B Trinity, Randolph 

Jackson, Eleanor, A.B Davidson, Mecklenburg 

Jernigan, Katherine, B.S.S.A Dunn, R. 5, Harnett 

Jessup, Martha, B.S.M Newton, Catawba 

Johnson, Bessie, A.B Henderson, Vance 

Johnson, Dorothy, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Johnson, Emeth, B.S.S.A Conway, N. C. 

Johnson, Merla, B.S.S.A Bunn, Franklin 

Johnston, Stella, B.S.S.A Davidson, Mecklenburg 

Johnston, Thelma, A.B Statesville, R. 3, Iredell 

Jones, Bernice, B.S.H.E Union Mills, Rutherford 

Jones, Frances, B.S.S.A Laurinburg, Scotland 

Jones, Mayme, B.S.S.A Eureka, Wayne 

Jordan, Mary Elizabeth, A.B Raleigh, R. 3, Wake 

Jordan, Mary Flack, B.S.P.E Laurinburg, Scotland 

Kearns, Eugenia, B.S.H.E Pleasant Garden, Guilford 

Keene, Madeleine, A.B Coats, Harnett 

Keller, Bertha, A.B Chimney Rock, Rutherford 

Kemp, Kay, B.S.S.A Zebulon, Wake 

Kerner, Frances, B.S.S.A Kernersville, Forsyth 

Kierman, Mary Elizabeth, B.S.S.A New Hayen, Conn. 

Kiker, Hazel, A.B Wadesboro, Anson 

Kiser, Helen, B.S.S.A Hickory, Catawba 

Kitchin, Florence, B.S.H.E Horse Shoe, Henderson 

Knott, Rowena, B.S.S.A Oxford, R. 1, Granville 

Lamm, Virginia, A.B Wilson, R. 2, Wilson 

Langston, Carolyn, A.B Danville, Va. 

Lawrence, Geraldine, B.S.H.E Hobgood, Halifax 

Lee, Virginia A., B.S.H.E Maiden, Catawba 

Lee, Virginia M., A.B Baltimore, Md. 

Lefler, Helen, B.S.P.E Norwood, Stanly 

Leonard, Ruth, B.S.P.E Cumberland, Md. 

Lewis, Lucile, B.S.S.A Tabor City, Columbus 



182 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

JUNIOR CLASS— Continued 

Lewis, Mary, B.S.H.E Walstonburg, R. 3, Pitt 

Lindsay, Mary, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Lippman, Elizabeth, B.S.P.E Springfield, Mass. 

Litchfield, Dorrice, B.S.P.E Emporia, Va. 

Little, Frances, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Littlefield, Dorothy, A.B Fairmont, Robeson 

Lockhart, Matrena, B.S.S.A Raleigh, Wake 

Long, Mary E., B.S.H.E Severn, Northampton 

Lowe, Frances, A.B Elon College, R. 2, Alamance 

McAvoy, Sarita, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

McCall, Vivian, B.S.S.A Salisbury, R. 2, Rowan 

McCallum, Nell, B.S.M Rowland, Robeson 

McDonald, Jean Elizabeth, A.B East Orange, N. J. 

MacDonald, Jean Kay, B.S.S.A Norton, Va. 

MacGoogan, Frances, B.S.S.A St. Pauls, Robeson 

Mcintosh, Isabel, A.B Summit, N. J. 

McKeithan, Ruth, B.S.S.A Darlington, S. C. 

McLeod, Kathryn, A.B Dunn, Harnett 

McQueen, Mary E., B.S.M Maxton, Robeson 

McRainey, Annie Florence, A.B Lumberton, Robeson 

McSwain, Jeanette, B.S.S.A Kings Mountain, R. 2, Cleveland 

Madry, Alice, A.B Rich Square, Northampton 

Magill, Ellen, A.B White Plains, N. Y... 

Mallard, Mary J., A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Maness, Ruth, A.B Hemp, Moore 

Mann, Doris, B.S.S.A Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Marshall, Doris, B.S.M Westfield, Surry 

Massey, Mabel, B.S.S.A Pleasant Hill, Northampton 

Matthews, Charlotte, A.B Stoneville, Rockingham 

Mendenhall, Martha, A.B Asheboro, Randolph 

Mercer, Louise, A.B Bladenboro, Bladen 

Mickey, Mary F., A.B Baltimore, Md. 

Miller, Juanita, A.B Salisbury, Rowan 

Miller, Mary, B.S.H.E Bakersville, Mitchell 

Miller, Millicent, B.S.M Taylorsville, Alexander 

Millssaps, Mildred, B.S.H.E Asheboro, Randolph 

Monroe, Sarah, A.B Fayetteville, R. 3, Cumberland 

Montgomery, Lillian, B.S.S.A Asheville, Buncombe 

Moore, Betty Lou, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Moore, Blanche, B.S.S.A Battleboro, Edgecombe 

Moore, Dai^y Lee B.S.H.E Wadesboro, R. 3, Anson 

Mordecai, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Raleigh, Wake 

Morgan, Helen Finch, A.B Albemarle, Stanly 

Morrison, Janet, B.S.S.A Flushing, N. Y. 

Morrow, Jean, A.B Albemarle, Stanly 

Moseley, Emma Kelly, B.S.H.E Warrenton, Warren 

Moss, Mary Frances. B.S.H.E Grover, Cleveland 

Mullican, Helen, B.S.H.E Walnut Cove, Stokes 

Murphy, Janet, B.S.S.A Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Murphy, Marguerite, A.B Waynesville, Haywood 

Murray, Jonlyn, B.S.S.A High Rock, Davidson 

Newby, Carolyn, B.S.S.A Newton, Catawba 

Norman, Oleen, A.B Elkin, Surry 

Norton, Marjorie, B.S.H.E Fairfield, Conn. 

Nunn, Elsie, A.B Whiteville, Columbus 

O'Bryan, Helen, B.S.H.E Beaufort, Carteret 

O'Connor, Jane, A.B Watertown, Conn. 

Oliver, Dora, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Oliver, M. Louise, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Ormond, Beulah, A.B Dover, Craven 

Osborne, Thelma, B.S.S.A High Point, Guilford 

Owen, Jeanne, B.S.S.A Gibsonville, Guilford 

Page, Ada, B.S.S.A Henderson, Vance 

Palmer, Martha Tugwell, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Parker, Frances, B.S.H.E Raleigh, Wake 

Parker, Helen, A.B .........Polkton, Anson 

Parker Jane, A.B Smithfield, Johnston 

Parker' Margaret. B.S.S.A ■••■■ Benson. Johnston 

Parrish, Annie Mae, B.S.P.E Louisburg R 3, Franklin 

Parsons, Irene, B.S.S.A N. Wilkesboro, Wilkes 



Student List 183 

JUNIOR CLASS— Continued 

Paschal, Janie, B.S.S.A Goldston, Chatham 

Paschall, Julia, A.B Wilson, Wilson 

Patten, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E New Bern, Craven 

Patterson, Dorothy, A.B Matthews, R. 1, Mecklenburg 

Peters, Alice M., A.B Grafton, Mass. 

Piller, Shirley, A.B Hawthorne, N. J. 

Pipkin, Marianna, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Pitman, Mary, A.B Penland, Mitchell 

Pittman, Rebecca, A.B Scotland Neck, Halifax 

Pleasant, Mildred, A.B Yanceyville, Caswell 

Pleasants, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Plonk, Virginia, A.B Kings Mountain, R. 1, Cleveland 

Poe, Nancy, A.B Rocky Mount, Nash 

Polk, Claudia Dare, A.B Rockingham, Richmond 

Popp, Lois, B.S.S.A New Haven, Conn. 

Porter, Alice, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Powell, Bessie, B.S.M Miami, Fla. 

Powers, Marie, B.S.H.E St. Pauls, Robeson 

Preddy, Theresa, B.S.S.A Madison, Rockingham 

Prevette, Betty, A.B. Asheboro, Randolph 

Pritchard, Alma, B.S.H.E Elizabeth City, Pasquotank 

Ramsaur, Sarah, A.B Lincolnton, Lincoln 

Rankin, Helen, B.S.S.A Gastonia, Gaston 

Ray, Stella, B.S.H.E Asheville, R. 2, Buncombe 

Register, Martha, A.B Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Reid, Edith, B.S.S.A Harmony, Iredell 

Ritchie, Helen, B.S.H.E Dinwiddie, Va. 

Roberts, Lucile, A.B Marshall, Madison 

Roberts, Mabel, B.S.S.A Hillsboro, R. 1, Orange 

Roesch, Clara, B.S.M Suffern, N. Y. 

Rogers, Estelle, B.S.H.E Creedmoor, Granville 

Rogers, Nan, B.S.P.E Graham, Alamance 

Rommel, Alia Irvine, A.B Louisville, Ky. 

Root, Elizabeth, A.B Rosebank, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Rosa, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Roth, Virginia, B.S.S.A New Haven, Conn. 

Royall, Christine, B.S.S.A Clinton, R. 1, Sampson 

Roys, Marjorie, B.S.S.A Mt. Clemens, Mich. 

Rubin, Blanche, B.S.S.A Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ruffin, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Tarboro, Edgecombe 

Russell, Betty Lee, B.S.M Asheville, Buncombe 

Safrit, Joyce, B.S.S.A. Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Safrit, Lucile, A.B Beaufort, Carteret 

Sandel, Betty Jean, B.S.H.E Raleigh, R. 3, Wake 

Sanders, Betsy, A.B Blue Ridge, Buncombe 

Sanders, Lula Mae, A.B Raleigh, Wake 

Sanford, Virginia, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Schoene, Willena, B.S.H.E Blacksburg, Va. 

Scholl, Elaine, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Scott, Frances, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Scott, Katherine, B.S.S.A Hamlet, Richmond 

Self, Ellen, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Shaffer, Doris, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Sharp, Florence, B.S.S.A Reidsville, Rockingham 

Sherrill, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Sherrill's Ford, R. 1, Catawba 

Sherwin, Helen, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Shuford, Adelaide, B.S.S.A Hickory, R. 3, Catawba 

Silbiger, Marjorie, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Siler, Delilah, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Silver, Cuba, B.S.S.A Raleigh, Wake 

Sloan, Sallie, A.B. Garland, Sampson 

Slocum, Mary, B.S.H.E Wilmington, R. 3, New Hanover 

Sloop, Eleanor, B.S.S.A Monroe, Union 

Smart, Betty, B.S.H.E Shelby, Cleveland 

Smith, Betsy, B.S.S.A Liberty, Randolph 

Smith, Florence F., B.S.S.A Erwin, Harnett 

Smith, Margaret W., A.B Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Smith, Mildred, B.S.S.A Kittrell, Vance 

Smith, Nancy, A.B Wilmington, New Hanover 

Smith, Naomi, B.S.M Benson, Johnston 

Smith, Rachel, A.B Francisco, Stokes 

Snyder, Vivian, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem, Forsyth 



184 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

JUNIOR CLASS— Continued 

Spivey, Celeste, B.S.H.E Rich Square, Northampton 

Staton, Frances, B.S.S.A Reidsville, R. 4, Rockingham 

Stedman, Gladys, A.B Arlington, N. J. 

Stephenson, Helen, B.S.M Angier, Harnett 

Stout, Jennie D., B.S.H.E Snow Camp, R. 2, Alamance 

Streetman, Jane, B.S.M Marion, McDowell 

Stuart, Mary Jane, B.S.H.E Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Sumner, Fannie, A.B Franklinville, Randolph 

Surles, Azalea, A.B Bladenboro, Bladen 

Sweet, Helen, A.B Scranton, Pa. 

Swindell, Dorothy, A.B Washington, Beaufort 

Talley, Katherine, A.B Randleman, Randolph 

Teague, Elizabeth, B.S.M Sanford, Lee 

Thayer, Hazel, A.B Mt. Pleasant, Cabarrus 

Thompson, Betty, A.B. Colerain, Bertie 

Tillett, Gladys, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Tomlin, Jennie V., B.S.H.E Gastonia, Gaston 

Trotter, Betsey, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Turlington, Yvette, B.S.H.E Goldsboro, Wayne 

Vreeland, Margaret, B.S.H.E Montclair, N. J. 

Vreeland, Mildred, A.B Fort Bragg, Cumberland 

Wade, Eleanor, B.S.P.E Pittsfield, Mass. 

Walker, Jane, B.S.M Waynesville, Haywood 

Walker, Josephine, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Walters, Lora, B.S.P.E LaGrange.Lenoir 

Ward, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Raleigh, Wake 

Ward, Muriel, B.S.H.E Ash, R. 1, Brunswick 

Ward, Sarah, A.B Hertford, Perquimans 

Warren, Inez, A.B , Garland, Sampson 

Warren, Sara, B.S.P.E Hurdle Mills, Person 

Warren, Vivian, B.S.S.A Newton Grove, Sampson 

Washington, Barbara, B.S.H.E Derby Line, Vt. 

Waters, Mary Frances, B.S.H.E Greensboro, R. 5, Guilford 

Watson, Louise, A.B Wadesboro, Anson 

Wells, Ruby Jane, B.S.H.E Bostic, R. 1, Rutherford 

Wells, Virginia, B.S.S.A. Greensboro, Guilford 

Welsh, Betty, A.B Monroe, Union 

Wenz, Pauline, B.S.H.E Asheville, Buncombe 

West, Betsey, A.B Wilmington, New Hanover 

White, Carolyn, B.S.S.A Roxboro, Person 

White, Faye, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

White, Louise, A.B Statesville, Iredell 

White, Nancy, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Whitlark, Faith, B.S.H.E Tarboro, Edgecombe 

Whitley, Mary Pelham. B.S.S.A Albemarle, Stanly 

Williams, Evelyn, B.S.H.E Lilesville, Anson 

Williams, Helen, A.B Leaksville, Rockingham 

Williams, Jean, B.S.M Warrenton, Warren 

Williams, Marjorie, A.B Swan Quarter, Hyde 

Williams, Sarah, B.S.S.A Statesville, Iredell 

Willis, Carolyn, B.S.H.E Raleigh, Wake 

Willis, Rachel, B.S.H.E Newton, R. 1, Catawba 

Willoughby, Jonnie Mae, B.S.H.E Ahoskie, Hertford 

Wilson, Ruth, B.S.S.A Chapanoke, Perquimans 

Winborne, Sarah, A.B Edenton, Chowan 

Winslow, Doris, B.S.S.A Robersonville, Martin 

Wiseman, Willie Mae, B.S.H.E Spruce Pine, Mitchell 

Wolfe, Carolyn, B.S.S.A Hickory, Catawba 

Woosley, Rebecca, B.S.S.A Granite Falls, Caldwell 

Work, Nellie, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Wrenn, Mary Louise, B.S.H.E Siler City, Chatham 

Wright, Doris, A.B Guilford College, Guilford 

Yarbrough, Rachel, B.S.P.E Yanceyville, Caswell 

Yeattes, Louise, A.B Pelham, R. 1, Rockingham 

Yelverton, Ermah, A.B Eureka, Wayne 

Younts, Mildred, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 



Student List 185 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Abernethy, Frances, A.B Hickory, R. 3, Catawba 

Alexander, Frances L., B.S.P.E Durham, Durham 

Allen, Christine, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Allen, Neita, B.S.P.E Henderson, Vance 

Alley, Elsie Coy, B.S.H.E Newton, Catawba 

Anderson, Margaret, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Anderson, Sara E., B.S.S.A Leaksville, Rockingham 

Andreotto, Angeline, B.S.H.E Clifton, N. J. 

Andrews, Doris, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Apple, Florence, A.B Greensboro, R. 1, Guilford 

Ardell, Frances, B.S.H.E Newark Valley, N. Y. 

Arey, Alice, A.B Worcester, Mass. 

Armstrong, Jeanelle^ B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Arney, Mabel, A.B Morganton, Burke 

Bailey, Marie, B.S.S.A. Burnsville, Yancey 

Baity, Sarah, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Baker, Margaret, A.B Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Ballow, Carolyn, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Barber, Betty, A.B Goldston, Chatham 

Barefoot, Nell, A.B Dunn, Harnett 

Barineau, Sadie, A.B Lincolnton, R. 3, Lincoln 

Barkelew, Marilyn, A.B Moorestown, N. J. 

Barker, Margaret, B.S.H.E Milton, Caswell 

Barnes, F. Elizabeth, A.B Princeton, N. J. 

Barnes, Faye, B.S.S.A Taylorsville, Alexander 

Barrett, Julia, A.B Kinston, Lenoir 

Batchelor, Sybil, A.B Aberdeen, Moore 

Beasley, Fleata, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Beck, Edith, A.B Philadelphia, Pa. 

Belk, Aileen, A.B Camden, Kershaw 

Bell, Georgia, A.B Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Bennett, Esther, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Berbert, Jean, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Berry, Blanche, A.B Hertford, Perquimans 

Bertram, Jean, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Betts, Helen, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Bissell, Frances, A.B Staten Island, N. Y. 

Blackman, Ruth, B.S.H.E Hillsboro, R. 2, Orange 

Blanton, Mary L., B.S.S.A Shelby, Cleveland 

Blauvelt, Elizabeth, B.S.P.E Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Blumenthal, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Franklin, Macon 

Boger, Elise, A.B Concord, Cabarrus 

Bowen, Estlina, B.S.S.A Durham, Durham 

Branch, Jacquelyn, B.S.S.A Raleigh, Wake 

Breeden, Edith, A.B Bennettsville, S. C. 

Breeden, Mary Gordon, A.B Bennettsville, S. C. 

Brickhouse, Myra, A.B Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Brickhouse, Ruth, A.B Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

Bright, Ruth, A-B New Hill, Wake 

Brown, Grace A., B.S.S.A Hendersonville, R. 4, Henderson 

Brown, Laura, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Brown, Lena C, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Brunt, Jessie, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Bryant, Marjorie, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Bullard, Bertha, B.S.S.A Fayetteville, R. 4, Cumberland 

Bunn, Louise, B.S.H.E Rocky Mount, R. 2, Edgecombe 

Burroughs, Elizabeth, B.A Norfolk, Va. 

Butler, Ruth, B.S.H.E Reidsville, R. 2, Rockingham 

Byerly, Emma, B.S.M Lexington, R. 4, Davidson 

Cable, Annie Lee, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Caldwell, Mary Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Lumberton, Robeson 

Campbell, Blanche, A.B Greensboro, R. 5, Guilford 

Campbell, Margaret, A.B , McLean, Va. 

Carnes, Lois, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Carswell, Roxie, B.S.H.E Erlanger, Davidson 

Carter, Margaret, B.S.H.E Clinton, R. 5, Sampson 

Cathey, Rena, A.B Canton, R. 2, Haywood 

Caveness, Edna, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Childs, June, B.S.S.A Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Chiles, Deborah, A.B Mt. Holly, Gaston 

Chronister, Mildred, B.S.S.A Lincolnton, Lincoln 



186 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 



SOPHOMORE CLASS— Continued 

Clapp, Esther, A.B Greensboro, R. 2, Guilford 

Clark, Annie Ruth, B.S.H.E Durham, R. 4, Durham 

Clark, Emogene, B.S.M White Plains, N. Y. 

Clark, Francanna, B.S.H.E Shelby, Cleveland 

Claywell, Frances, B.S.H.E Morganton, Burke 

Coan, Katherine, B.S.S.A Newport, Vt. 

Cochrane, Mary Lucille, A.B Laurel Hill, Scotland 

Cockerham, Frances, B.S.S.A Mt. Airy, Surry 

Cockfield, Marveign, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Coleman, Martha Page, B.S.P.E Hilton Village, Va. 

Conklin, Marjorie, A.B Great Neck, N. Y. 

Conyers, Alice, A.B Youngsville, Franklin 

Cook, Elizabeth C, B.S.P.E Raleigh, Wake 

Cooke, Elizabeth M., A.B Franklinton, Franklin 

Cooke, Margaret J., A.B Aulander, Bertie 

Cooper, Dorothy, A.B Henderson, Vance 

Cooper, Mary Willard, A.B Murphy, Cherokee 

Corwin, Zabelle, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Cox, Mary Frances, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Cox, Noelie, A.B Chapel Hill, Orange 

Coyle, Flora, B.S.S.A Wilson, Wilson 

Creech, Polly, A.B Chevy Chase, Md. 

Croom, Norma, A.B Wilmington, New Hanover 

Crumpton, Nell, B.S.H.E Roxboro, R. 2, Person 

Crutchfield, Christine, B.S.H.E Graham, R. 1, Alamance 

Currin, Betsy, B.S.S.A Oxford, R. 3, Granville 

Dark, Maxine, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Darvin, Lucille, A.B New City, N. Y. 

Daughtridge, Mary Lee, B.S.H.E Rocky Mount, Edgecombe 

Davis, Julia, B.S.H.E Newland, Avery 

DeBoe, Mary, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Delbridge, Dorothy, A.B Norlina, Warren 

Dellinger, Gladys, A.B. Cherryville, Gaston 

Dickens, Louise, A.B Roxboro, Person 

Dillingham, Frances, B.S.H.E Barnardsville, Buncombe 

Dixon, Martha V., A.B Pisgah Forest, Transylvania 

Dixon, Rebekah, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Dobbins, Anne, B.S.H.E Yadkinville, Yadkin 

Downey, Priscilla, B.S.H.E Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Duckworth, Mae, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

duFour. Elizabeth, A.B Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Dulin, Jean, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Dunlap, Roberta, A.B Wadesboro, Anson 

Dunn, Mary, A.B Rocky Mount, Nash 

Early, Emily, A.B Ahoskie, Hertford 

Edmondson, Cornelia, B.S.P.E Plymouth, Washington 

Edmunds, Isabel, A.B Lynchburg, Va. 

Edwards, Estelle, A.B Highlands, Macon 

Edwards, Marjorie, A.B Peachland, Anson 

Edwards, Molly, B.S.S.A Pinetops, Edgecombe 

Elliot, Ann, B.S.H.E Fayetteville, R. 3, Cumberland 

Emmons, Jean, B.S.S.A Deal, N. J. 

Ensley, Clarice, A.B Thomasville, R. 1, Davidson 

Eppes, Mary, A.B Annapolis, Md. 

Everett, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Ahoskie, Hertford 

Farmer, Doris, B.S.H.E Rockingham, Richmond 

Fater, Ellaine, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Ferguson, Nancy, A.B Riverside, 111. 

Ferguson, Nina, A.B Pittsboro, Chatham 

Fike, Evelyn, A.B Ahoskie, Hertford 

Folger, Betsy, B.S.S.A Dobson, Surry 

Forbes, Nell, B.S.P.E Gastonia, Gaston 

Forster, Clara M., A.B Raleigh, Wake 

Forsythe, Rebecca, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Foust, Dorothy, A.B Graham, Alamance 

Franck, Grace, A.B Scotland Neck, Halifax 

Frank, Carlyn, A.B Ridgewood, N. J. 

Fulk, Rebecca, A.B Pilot Mountain, Surry 



Student List 187 

SOPHOMORE CLASS— Continued 

Gainey, Sarah, B.S.H.E Fayetteville, R. 7, Cumberland 

Gardner, Elizabeth, A.B Hendersonville, Henderson 

Gattis, Martha, B.S.S.A Clayton, Johnston 

Godbold, Mary, A.B South Boston, Va. 

Goforth, Mary Elizabeth, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Goldman, Beatrice, B.S.S.A New Bern, Craven 

Gorrell, Elizabeth, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Graham, Lesbia, A.B Elkin, Surry 

Grant, Mary Emma, A.B Wilmington, New Hanover 

Grantham, Jean, B.S.S.A Wilson, Wilson 

Graves, Peggy, A.B Southern Pines, Moore 

Gregson, Mary. A.B Hamlet, Richmond 

Griffin, Dorothy, B.S.P.E Charlotte Mecklenburg 

Griffin, Margaret, B.S.S.A Woodville, Bertie 

Grose, Vera, B.S.S.A Harmony, Iredell 

Gueth, Dorothy, B.S.P.E High Point, Guilford 

Guin, Maribelle, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Guion, Julia, B.S.H.E New Bern, Craven 

Gunn, Ruth Helen, A.B Reidsville, R. 3, Rockingham 

Gwyn, Mary Jean, B.S.S.A. Mt. Airy, Surry 

Hackney, Evelyn J., A.B Wilson, Wilson 

Haigler, Catherine, B.S.H.E Monroe, R. 2, Union 

Hakes, Elise, B.S.S.A Little Switzerland, Mitchell 

Hall, Carol, B.S.H.E New Bern, Craven 

Hall, Louise, A.B Woodsdale, Person 

Hall, Violet, B.S.S.A Bahama, Durham 

Hamlin, Doris, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Hammond, Frances, B.S.S.A New Bern, Craven 

Hanson, Katherine, B.S.S.A Wilmington, New Hanover 

Harding, Josie, B.S.S.A Washington, Beaufort 

Hardy, Mattie Lou, A.B Sanford, Lee 

Harkey x Nanearle, B.S.H.E Mocksville, R. 2, Davie 

Harless, Dorothy, B.S.M Lenoir, Caldwell 

Harrell, Elizabeth, A.B Colerain, Bertie 

Harrell, Vivian, B.S.H.E Wilmington, New Hanover 

Harrelson, Virginia, A.B Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Hassell, Ruth, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Hawes, Katherine, B.S.S.A Atkinson, Pender 

Haynes, Margaret, B.S.S.A Durham, Durham 

Hedgepeth, Lois, B.S.S.A Ahoskie, Hertford 

Heffner, Ruth, A.B. Greensboro, R. 3, Guilford 

Hefner, Margaret, B.S.H.E Hamlet, Richmond 

Henning, Frances, B.S.H.E Albemarle, Stanly 

Henry, Frances, A.B Rocky Mount, Edgecombe 

Herndon, Cora, B.S.S.A. Kings Mountain, Cleveland 

Hewitt, Isabella, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Higdon, Helen, B.S.H.E Webster, Jackson 

Higgins, Ruth, A.B Franklin, Macon 

High, Frances, A.B Wilson, Wilson 

Hilderman, Catherine, A.B Southern Pines, Moore 

Hill, Flayree, B.S.S.A Union Mills, Rutherford 

Hill, Mildred, A.B Murphy, Cherokee 

Hines, Annis, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Hinton, Lula, A.B Pittsboro, Chatham 

Hobbs, Ernestine, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Holder, Valeria, B.S.H.E St. Pauls, Robeson 

Holmes, Doris, B.S.S.A High Point, Guilford 

Holmes, Marjorie, B.S.S.A Red Bank, N. J. 

Holt, Ruth, A.B Princeton, Johnston 

Holton, Marjorie, A.B Yadkinville, Yadkin 

Hoots, Kathleen, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Horton, Frances, B.S.H.E Albemarle, Stanly 

House, Eleanora, B.S.S.A* Newton Grove, R. 2, Sampson 

Howard, Dorothy, A.B Wilson, Wilson 

Howard, Josephine, A.B Fort Bragg, Cumberland 

Howell, Donna, B.S.S.A Hamlet, Richmond 

Howell, Nancy, B.S.S.A Hamlet, Richmond 

Howerton, Marjorie, B.S.H.E Greensboro, R. 5, Guilford 

Hughes, Georgie, B.S.S.A Oriental, Pamlico 

Hunter, Sara Jane, A.B Hendersonville, Henderson 

Husketh, Janie, B.S.S.A Kittrell, Vance 

Hylton, Jean, A.B. Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Hyman, Claire, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 



188 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

SOPHOMORE CLASS— Continued 

Idol, Nancy, A.B Pleasant Garden, Guilford 

Israel, Christine, A.B Candler, R. 1, Buncombe 

Jackson, Rebecca, B.S.S.A Hendersonville, Henderson 

Johnson, Helen, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Johnson, Marjorie E., A.B Benson, Johnston 

Jones, Harriet, A.B Raleigh, Wake 

Jones, Ruth, A.B LaGrange, Lenoir 

Jones, Virginia, B.S.H.E Lenoir, Caldwell 

Joslyn, Amy, B.S.M Morehead City, Carteret 

Keck, Alberta, B.S.S.A Snow Camp, R. 2, Alamance 

Kelly, Mary Parker, A.B North Wilkesboro, Wilkes 

Kernodle, Cassandra, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Ketner, Virginia, A.B Salisbury, Rowan 

King, Nancy Dixon, B.S.M Greensboro, Guilford 

King, Nancy Jane High Point, R. 1, Guilford 

Knofsky, Betty Jean, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Knotts, Mildred, A.B Lilesville, Anson 

Kornegay, Delia, A.B Dover, Craven 

Kuhn, Marion, B.S.S.A Davidson, Mecklenburg 

Lamb, Betty E., B.S.S.A Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Lapham, Jean, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Layne, Lillian, B.S.P.E High Point, Guilford 

Lee, Frances, B.S.S.A Newton Grove, Sampson 

LeGrand, Merrimon, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Leonard, Marie, A.B Lexington, R. 3, Davidson 

Leonard, Martha, A.B Lexington, Davidson 

Levine, Peggy, B.S.P.E Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Liles, Virginia, A.B Badin, Stanly 

Little, Kathryn, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Little, Margaret, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Lloyd, Mable, B.S.S.A Efland, Orange 

Lollar, Maida, B.S.S.A Rutherfordton, R. 1, Rutherford 

Long, Lucille, B.S.H.E Newell, Mecklenburg 

Luther, Patty, B.S.S.A Liberty, Randolph 

Lyerly, Virginia, B.S.H.E Woodleaf, Rowan 

Lyon. Euva Mae, A.B Creedmoor, Granville 

Lytton, Betty, A.B Wilmington, New Hanover 

McBride, Dorothy, B.S.P.E Marshville, Union 

McBryde, Carolyn, A.B. Raeford, R. 1, Hoke 

McDonald, Carey, B.S.H.E. Gibson, Scotland 

McDuffie, Dorothy, A.B Henderson, Vance 

McGehee, Eloise, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

McGlammery, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Lenoir, Caldwell 

McKnight, Alice, B.S.H.E Greensboro, R. 2, Guilford 

McKoin, Esther, B.S.H.E Thomasville, Davidson 

McLaurin, Barbara, B.S.H.E Bennettsville, S. C. 

McLendon, Margaret, A.B Rockingham, Richmond 

McLeod, Sarah. B.S.H.E McBee, S. C. 

McNeely, Virginia, B.S.H.E Shelby, Cleveland 

McNeill, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Fairmont, R. 1, Robeson 

McPhail, Martha, B.S.S.A Mount Olive, Wayne 

MacQueen, Mary Katherine, B.S.H.E Maxton, Robeson 

Mackie, Mary Lou, A.B Gastonia, Gaston 

Malin, Jeanne, A.B. Greensboro, Guilford 

Mangum, Lynette, A.B Rocky Mount, Edgecombe 

Mann, Beatrice, B.S.S.A Whiteville, Columbus 

Mansfield, Dorothy, B.S.H.E New Haven, Conn. 

Marrow, Dorothy, A.B Bullock, Granville 

Marsh, Mae, A.B Marshville, Union 

Mason, Constance, A.B. Garden City, N. Y. 

Mason, Jean, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Matlock, Ola, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Mayfield, Panthea, A.B Norlina, Warren 

Medford, Martha, B.S.H.E Canton, Haywood 

Meekins, Levina, B.S.S.A Wanchese, Dare 

Melvin, Inez, B.S.H.E Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Melvin, Mae, A.B Fayetteville, R. 2, Cumberland 

Middleton, Maude, B.S.H.E. Walnut Cove, R. 2, Stokes 

Midgette, Louise, B.S.S.A Swannanoa, Buncombe 



Student List 189 

SOPHOMORE CLASS— Continued 

Miller, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Annapolis, Md. 

Milloway, Phyllis, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Mitchell, Evelyn, B.S.H.E Kittrell, Franklin 

Mohorn, Susie, B.S.S.A. Weldon, Halifax 

Monson, Mary, A.B Quantico, Va. 

Moore, Millicent, B.S.S.A Burlington, Alamance 

Moore, Virginia, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Morgan, Helen Frances, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount, Nash 

Morrison, Marian, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Morrow, Guille, B.S.H.E Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Morrow, Martha, B.S.H.E Albemarle, Stanly 

Moseley, Charlotte, A.B Kinston, Lenoir 

Moseley, Leah, B.S.H.E Kinston, R. 2, Lenoir 

Mulcahey, Bernyce, A.B Westfield, Mass. 

Murchison, Sue, A.B Rocky Mount, Edgecombe 

Murphrey, Georgine, A.B Rocky Mount, Nash 

Myers, Marie, A.B Liberty, R. 3, Alamance 

Neel, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Wilkesboro, Wilkes 

Nelson, Rhoda, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Neville, Barbara, A.B Chapel Hill, Orange 

Newell, Eloise, B.S.P.E Roxboro, Person 

Newsom, Frances, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Nichols, Josephine, B.S.S.A Mt. Clemens, Mich. 

Nye, Lucille, B.S.H.E Fairmont, R. 2, Robeson 

Nye, Undine, B.S.S.A Grassy Creek, Ashe 

O'Brien, Nancy, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

O'Connor, Ruthe, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Oettinger, Ernestine, A.B Wilson, Wilson 

Oliver, K. Louise, A.B Roxboro, Person 

O'Neal, Betty, B.S.S.A Sugar Grove, Watauga 

Overman, Ida, A.B Elizabeth City, Pasquotank 

Owen, Florence, A.B Roseboro, Sampson 

Pardue, Mary Frances, A.B North Wilkesboro, Wilkes 

Parham, Annie, A.B Oxford, Granville 

Paris, Catherine, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Park, Betty, B.S.H.E Greensboro, R. 3, Guilford 

Parker, Anne, A.B Albemarle, Stanly 

Parker, Madeline, B.S.S.A Sunbury, Gates 

Parker, Selene, B.S.S.A Dunn, Harnett 

Parkin, Anne, A.B Manteo, Dare 

Payne, Mary, A.B High Point, Guilford 

Pearce, M. Anne, B.S.P.E. Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Pearce, Eleanor, A.B Wake Forest, R. 2, Wake 

Peay, Pauline, B.S.H.E Madison. Rockingham 

Peele, Mary Falls, B.S.H.E Laurinburg, Scotland 

Petersen, Jeanne, B.S.H.E Park Ridge, N. J. 

Peterson, Dorothy. B.S.H.E Staten Island, N. Y. 

Phillips, Helen, B.S.H.E Asheboro, Randolph 

Pickard, Janice Celeste, A.B Wilmington, New Hanover 

Pickard, Margaret, A.B Wilmington, New Hanover 

Pilley, Mary Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Pantego, Beaufort 

Pittman, Sarah Maude, A.B Fairmont, Robeson 

Pitts, Mary, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Pleasant, Almeta, A.B Roanoke Rapids, Halifax 

Plummer, Peggy, A.B Washington, D. C. 

Poe, Fannie, A.B Siler City, R. 2, Chatham 

Poole, Carolyn C, A.B Freehold, N. J. 

Potts, Carolyn, B.S.H.E. Highlands, Macon 

Potts, Margaret, A.B Davidson, Mecklenburg 

Price, Eupha Maye, A.B Monroe, R. 2, Union 

Quinn, Margaret, A.B East Hampton, Conn. 

Rains, Rebecca, A.B King, Stokes 

Ramsaur, Margaret, B.S.S.A Lincolnton, Lincoln 

Ramsey, M. Frances, A.B. Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Rasberry, Mary F., B.S.H.E Snow Hill, Greene 

Ray, Mary Lillie, B.S.H.E Lillington, R. 3, Harnett 

Reilley, Marie, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Reinhardt, Elizabeth, A.B Stanley, R., Lincoln 

Renegar, Hilda, B.S.H.E Elkin, Surry 



190 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

SOPHOMORE CLASS— Continued 

Rephan, Fay, B.S.S.A Charleston, S. C. 

Revelle, Ann, A.B. Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Reynolds, Betty, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Reynolds, Sue, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Rhyne, Ruth, A.B Mt. Holly, R., Gaston 

Riden, Jean, A.B Boonville, Yadkin 

Riggs, Mary, B.S.S.A Oriental, Pamlico 

Robbins, Doris, A.B Rocky Mount, Edgecombe 

Roberts, Theo, A.B Riverdale, N. Y. 

Robeson, Louise, B.S.S.A Wilmington, New Hanover 

Robinette, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Taylorsville, Alexander 

Robinson, Rachael, A.B Clinton, Sampson 

Rogers, Betty Louise, B.S.M Franklin, Macon 

Rogers, Constance, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Rogers, N. Geraldine, B.S.P.E Clyde, R. 1, Haywood 

Rook, Lucille, B.S.S.A Roanoke Rapids, Halifax 

Rose, Allene, A.B Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Rose, Billie, B.S.S.A Henderson, Vance 

Rouse, Doris, B.S.S.A Farmville, Pitt 

Rudisill, Helen, B.S.H.E Marshall, Madison 

Russell, Betsy, A.B Oxford, R. 1, Granville 

Rutherford, Edythe, A.B Candler, Buncombe 

Ryan, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Asheville, Buncombe 

Sadler, Mary, B.S.H.E Charlotte, R. 6, Mecklenburg 

Sargent, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Mt. Airy, Surry 

Sattler, Pauline, B.S.P.E Monkton, Md. 

Sawyer, Marian, B.S.P.E Franklinton, Franklin 

Schwartz, Elsie Kay, A.B Mt. Clemens, Mich. 

Scott, Mary Ann, A.B Lexington, R. 1, Davidson 

Scott, Mary Kerr, B.S.S.A Haw River, Alamance 

Seagle, Susan, B.S.H.E Hendersonville, R. 1, Henderson 

Sharpe, Doris, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Sharpe, Elizabeth G., A.B Belmont, Mass. 

Sheild, Ellen, A.B Asbury Park, N. J. 

Sholar, Peggy, B.S.S.A Whiteville, Columbus 

Showalter, Martha, B.S.S.A Raleigh, Wake 

Sikes, Rhea, B.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Siler, Doris, A.B Pittsboro, Chatham 

Sink, Eunice, B.S.H.E Lexington, Davidson 

Slocum, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Wilmington, R. 3, New Hanover 

Smith, Betty Ann, A.B Bay City, Mich. 

Smith, Eloise DeEtta, B.S.P.E Kernersville, R. 1, Forsyth 

Smith, Ernestine, B.S.M Maxton, Robeson 

Smith, Frances Evelyn, B.S.H.E Greeftsboro, R. 1, Guilford 

Smith, Gladys, B.S.S.A Siler City, Chatham 

Smith, Jean B Wilmington, New Hanover 

Smith, Sallie, A.B Lincolnton, Lincoln 

Smith, H. Virginia, A.B Star, Montgomery 

Southerland, Eleanor, B.S.H.E Kenansville, Duplin 

Southerland, Ellen, B.S.H.E Kenansville, Duplin 

Stallings, Jane, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Staton, Mary Dunn, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Steagall, Martha, B.S.H.E Morven, Anson 

Stem, Mary Margaret, A.B Darlington, S. C. 

Stern, Hilda, A.B Chapel Hill, Orange 

Stevenson, Betty Nell, B.S.S.A Taylorsville, R. 1, Alexander 

Stewart, Josephine, A.B Whitsett, R. 1, Guilford 

Stockard, Nancy, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Stratton, Henrietta, A.B Charlottesville, Va. 

Strickland, Ruth, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Stringfield, Lois, B.S.H.E Stamford, Conn. 

Sugg, Catherine, A.B Snow Hill, Greene 

Sullivan, Marjorie, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Swain, Mary, A.B. ..„ Greensboro, Guilford 

Sweet, Mary Elizabeth, A.B Spencer, Rowan 

Talley, Frances, A.B Randleman, Randolph 

Tanner, Mary, B.S.S.A Henderson, Vance 

Tate, Mabel, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Taylor, Eloise, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Taylor, Frances, A.B Bethel, Pitt 

Taylor, Harris, A.B Mooresville, Iredell 

Taylor, Margaret Bunn, A.B Nashville, R. 1, Nash 



Student List 191 

SOPHOMORE CLASS—Continued 

Taylor, Marguerite, B.S.H.E Hanes, Forsyth 

Templeton, Frances, A.B Raleigh, Wake 

Thomas, Lucile, B.S.S.A Beaufort, Carteret 

Thomasson, Jean, B.S.S.A Spindale, Rutherford 

Thomasson, Rebecca, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Thompson, Gertrude, B.S.S.A Elizabeth City, Pasquotank 

Thompson, Mary White, B.S.P.E Wilson, Wilson 

Tippett, Inez, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Tomlinson, Mary, B.S.S.A Wilson, Wilson 

Tooly, Sidney Anne, B.S.P.E Belhaven, Beaufort 

Triplett, Etta Lee, B.S.H.E Purlear, Wilkes 

Tucker, Margaret G., A.B Ahoskie, Hertford 

Tucker, Nell, A.B Whitakers, Edgecombe 

Tucker, Nelson, B.S.H.E Danville, Va. 

Turrentine, Anne, A.B Elizabethton, Tenn. 

Umstead, Sarah, A.B Chapel Hill, Orange 

Vache, Virginia, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Van Hoy, Margaret, B.S.S.A Walkertown, Forsyth 

Wade, Elizabeth, A.B Morehead City, Carteret 

Wadsworth, Emmy Lou, B.S.S.A Concord, Cabarrus 

Waggoner, Sara, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Walker, Betty, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Walker, Julia, B.S.P.E Crewe, Va. 

Wall, Billie Marie, B.S.M Asheville, Buncombe 

Wall, Marion, A.B Randleman, Randolph 

Wallace, Margaret, B.S.H.E Newark, N. J. 

Waller, Doris Betty, A.B Rocky Mount, Nash 

Walser, Jacksie, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Warren, Katherine, B.S.S.A Raleigh, Wake 

Washburn, Esteile, A.B Marion, McDowell 

Weaver, Marvelle, B.S.S.A Newton, R. 1, Catawba 

Weaver, Shirley, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Webb, Catherine, B.S.S.A Washington, Beaufort 

Welborn, Jean, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Wells, Marie, A.B Rocky Mount, Nash 

Weskett, Margaret, B.S.H.E New Bern, Craven 

West, Lottie Faye, A.B Dover, Craven 

Whalin, Frances, A.B Middlesboro, Ky. 

Whalin, Jane, A.B. Middleboro, Ky. 

Wheeler, Lelia, B.S.H.E Sanford, Lee 

White, Betty, A.B Clayton, Johnston 

White, Josephine. B.S.S.A Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

White, Ormond, A.B. Buxton, Dare 

Whitesides, Doris, B.S.H.E Newland, Avery 

Whitley, Eunice, B.S.H.E Wilson, R. 3, Wilson 

Whitlock, Helen, B.S.H.E Albemarle, R. 4, Stanly 

Wible, Wilburta, A.B Little Valley, N. Y. 

Williams, Fanny R., B.S.S.A Windsor, Bertie 

Williams, Geneva, B.S.H.E Biscoe, Montgomery 

Wilson, Alice, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Wilson, Rebecca, B.S.H.E Blanche, Caswell 

Wilson, Rose, A.B Rocky Mount, Edgecombe 

Winborne, Eloise, B.S.S.A Sims, Wilson 

Winstead, Sarah, A.B Roxboro, Person 

Woodlief, Mary Ellen, B.S.S.A Kittrell, Vance 

Woolard, Blanche, B.S.S.A Wilson, Wilson 

Wright, Lena, A.B Anderson, R. 4, Vance 

Wyche, Barbara, B.S.S.A Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Zimmerman, Roberta, A.B Aberdeen, Moore 



192 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Abernathy, Eloise, B.S.M Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Abernethy, Nancy, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Abernethy, Pauline, A.B Raleigh, Wake 

Adams, Jane Wyche, A.B Gastonia, Gaston 

Aldridge, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Kinston, R. 2, Lenoir 

Alexander, Nancy Lee, B.S.H.E Matthews, R. 1, Mecklenburg 

Alexander, Ruth, A.B Durham, Durham 

Alf, Frances, B.S.M Buffalo, N. Y. 

Allen, Carol, A.B Warehouse Point, Conn. 

Allen, Frances, B.S.H.E Knightdale, Wake 

Allen, Virginia, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Allison, Mary, B.S.S.A Forest City, Rutherford 

Ames, Helen, A.B Ransomville, N. Y. 

Anderson, Sara P., A.B Wilson, Wilson 

Andrews, Earle Proctor, A.B Bethel, Pitt 

Andrews, Sara E., A.B Mount Olive, Wayne 

Apple, Lois, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Arey, Mary, B.S.S.A Raleigh, Wake 

Armfield, Millicent, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Arrington, Virginia, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Austin, DeEtte, A.B Asheboro, Randolph 

Austin, Margaret, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Aycock, Carley, B.S.S.A Fremont, Wayne 

Aycock, Louise, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount, Nash 

Aycock, Mildred, B.S.S.A Fremont, Wayne 

Bacon, Ellen, B.S.H.E Hillsboro, Orange 

Baer, Frances, A.B Dunn, Harnett 

Bailey, Petria, A.B Southern Pines, Moore 

Baker, Betty, A.B High Point, Guilford 

Baker, Frances, A.B Holly Springs, Wake 

Baker, Violet, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Baldwin, Julia, B.S.S.A Sanford, Lee 

Baldwin, Ruth, A.B Bath, Beaufort 

Barclay, Phyllis, A.B Portsmouth, Va. 

Barden, Nancy, B.S.H.E Goldsboro, R. 2, Wayne 

Barkdall, Fay, B.S.H.E Hagerstown, R. 5, Md. 

Barrett, Rachel, A.B Farmville, Pitt 

Bartholomew, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Wallingford, Conn. 

Bason, Carolyn, B.S.S.A Yanceyville, Caswell 

Bass, Martha, B.S.S.A. Lucama, Wilson 

Bateman, Louise, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Bates, Bettye, A.B. Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Baynton, Doris, A.B Rumson, N. J. 

Beal, Kathleen, B.S.S.A Bear Creek, Chatham 

Beam, Emma Joe, B.S.H.E Shelby, Cleveland 

Beard, Mary Hines, A.B Hillsboro, Orange 

Bearmore, Ruth, B.S.M Princeton, N. J. 

Bell, Anna, B.S.M Greensboro, Guilford 

Bell, Elizabeth, A.B Durham, R. 2, Durham 

Belh. Mary Frances, A.B Murphy, Cherokee 

Benbow, Marjorie. A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Bendigo, Elizabeth, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Bennett, Menefee, A.B Norwood, Stanly 

Bennett, Persis, A.B Fair Haven, N. J. 

Benton, Virginia, B.S.S.A Monroe, Union 

Berelowitz, Norma, B.S.H.E Whitmire, S. C. 

Bierman, Doris, A.B Haworth, N. J. 

Bittick, Margaret, A.B Winchester, Mass. 

Blades, Emma, B.S.H.E New Bern, Craven 

Blois, Idamae, A.B Cranford, N. J. 

Blue, Helena, B.S.M Carthage, Moore 

Boatman, Louise, A.B Norton, Kansas 

Boney, Dorothy, A.B Wallace, Duplin 

Booker, Dorothy, A.B Colon, Lee 

Booth, Jean, A.B. Durham, Durham 

Booth, Patricia, A.B Hampton, Va. 

Bowden, Ruth, B.S.H.E Advance, Davie 

Bowen, Agnes S., B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Bowling, Katherine, A.B Durham, Durham 

Bown, Virginia, B.S.S.A Ridgewood, N. J. 

Boyd, Carol, A.B Belhaven, Beaufort 

Boyette, Doris, B.S.H.E Kenly, R. 2, Johnston 

Boyette, Lillian, A.B Ahoskie, Hertford 



Student List 193 

FRESHMAN CLASS— Continued 

Bracy, Lucy, B.S.S.A Rich Square, Northampton 

Bragg, Emma, B.S.M Creedmoor, Granville 

Bramble, Mary, A.B Annapolis, Md. 

Brannon, Betty Jo, A.B Middleboro, Ky. 

Braswell, Ada, B.S.H.E Wadesboro, R. 3, Anson 

Brath, Jacqueline, A.B Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Bready, Jayne, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Brennan, Marie, A.B Port Chester, N. Y. 

Brickhouse, Esther, B.S.H.E Columbia, Tyrrell 

Bright, Flora, B.S.S.A Rutherford College, Burke 

Brinson, Gladys, A.B Bayboro, Pamlico 

Britt, Frances, A.B Fairmont, Robeson 

Brooks, Carolyn, B.S.H.E E. Falls Church, Va. 

Brooks, Geraldine B., B.S.H.E Midland, Cabarrus 

Brooks, Marianne, B.S.H.E Austell, Ga. 

Broome, Virginia, A.B Southern Pines, Moore 

Brown, Ethel, B.S.H.E Tryon, Polk 

Bryan, Mary, B.S.S.A Wilmington, New Hanover 

Bryant, Betty Jean, B.S.S.A Oxford, Granville 

Bryant, Hazel, A.B Rich Square, Northampton 

Bullard, Doris Geraldine, B.S.H.E Lumebrton, Robeson 

Burkhead, Ann, B.S.H.E Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Burney, Mary Margaret, B.S.H.E Aberdeen, Moore 

Butler, Anne Marsh, B.S.S.A St. Pauls, Robeson 

Caldwell, Ethel, B.S.H.E Waynesville, R. 2, Haywood 

Cameron, Julia, B.S.H.E Polkton, Anson 

Campbell, Anne, B.S.M Durham, Durham 

Campbell, Janet, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Campbell, Jean, B.S.S.A Lakewood, Ohio 

Cantrell, Mary Lee, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Carman, Sara, A.B Baltimore, Md. 

Carter, Bernice, B.S.H.E Asheville, Buncombe 

Caruthers, Virginia, B.S.M Graham, Alamance 

Carver, Carol, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Cash, Ruth, A.B Apex, Wake 

Cashion, Dorothy, A.B Cornelius, Mecklenburg 

Chadbourn, Mimi, A.B. Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Chamberlain, Marilynn, B.S.H.E Plainfield, N. J. 

Chandler, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Spencer, Rowan 

Cherry, Martha, B.S.H.E Scotland Neck, Halifax 

Chesnutt, Lena, A.B Seven Springs, Duplin 

Childs, Mary Elizabeth, A.B Pittsfield, Mass. 

Chinnis, Betty, B.S.H.E Leland, Brunswick 

Choate, Vancine, A.B Sparta, Alleghany 

Christensen, Carroll, A.B Beaufort, S. C. 

Clark, Doris, A.B Raleigh, Wake 

Clark, Frances, B.S.S.A Chapel Hill, Orange 

Clement, Elinor, A.B Lincoln University, Pa. 

Clements, Mary Louise, B.S.M North Wilkesboro, Wilkes 

Cline, Irma, B.S.H.E Newton, Catawba 

Cline, Sue, B.S.H.E Taylorsville, Alexander 

Clodfelter, Henrietta, A.B. Greensboro, R. 3, Guilford 

Coble, Beatrice, A.B Oakboro, Stanly 

Coble, Carrilee, A.B Oakboro, Stanly 

Cohen, Sylvia, B.S.S.A. Statesville, Iredell 

Collison, Blanche, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Comins, Jean, A.B Bluefield, W. Va. 

Conboy, Evelyn, A.B Scarborough, N. Y. 

Conway, Anne, A.B Durham, Durham 

Cook, Georgena, B.S.P.E Stokesdale, Guilford 

Cooke, Lucille, A.B Clover, S. C. 

Cooley, Agnes, A.B. Wagram, Scotland 

Corbin, Doris, A.B Gneiss, Macon 

Cornwell, Faye, B.S.H.E Shelby, R. 1, Cleveland 

Correll, Elizabeth, A.B Chapel Hill, Orange 

Covington, Betty, A.B Laurinburg, Scotland 

Covington, Frances, A.B Troy, Montgomery 

Cox, Dorothy, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Cox, Flora, B.S.M Carthage, Moore 

Cox, Kathryn, A.B Fremont, Wayne 

Cox, Marguerite, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Cox, Virginia D., A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Creech, Dorothy, A.B Goldsboro, Wayne 



194 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

FRESHMAN CLASS— Continued 

Crooks, Phyllis, A.B Concord, Cabarrus 

Crosby, Jean, B.S.S.A Brattleboro, Vt. 

Culpepper, Myra, A.B Arlington, Va. 

Cummings, Myrtle, A.B Guilford College, R. 1, Guilford 

Currin, Ruth, B.S.S.A Oxford, Granville 

Dahlin, Betty, A.B McKeesport, Pa. 

Danolds, Diana, A.B Wallingford, Vt. 

Darden, Beatrice, A.B Fayetteville, R. 6, Cumberland 

Dark, Emmie, A.B. Siler City, Chatham 

Daugherty, Virginia, B.S.P.E New Bern, Craven 

Davis, Helen Blanche, A.B. Badin, Stanly 

Davis, Helen Bridgers, B.S.S.A Roanoke Rapids, Halifax 

Davis, Jean, A.B Warrenton, Warren 

Davis, Martha, B.S.H.E Durham, Durham 

Davis, Mary Elizabeth, A.B Cranford, N. J. 

Davison, Shirley, A.B Great Neck, N. Y. 

Day, Miriam, B.S.M Spruce Pine, Mitchell 

Dees, Eula Mae, A.B Bayboro, Pamlico 

Dees, Julia, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Dellinger, Willie, A.B Lowell, Gaston 

Denman, Helen, B.S.S.A White Plains, N. Y. 

DeVane, Cantey, A.B Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Dickens, Mary Lewis, B.S.S.A Roxboro, Person 

Dickenson, Willie Lee, A.B Richlands, Va. 

Dickerson, Dorothy, B.S.S.A Oxford, Granville 

Dixon, Martha H., A.B Kinston, Lenoir 

Dobbins, Grace, B.S.H.E Yadkinville, Yadkin 

Doggett, Esther, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Doggett, Mabel, B.S.H.E Shelby, Cleveland 

Douglas, Dorothy, B.S.P.E Pittsfield, Mass. 

Douglas, Nancy, B.S.H.E Ellenville, N. Y. 

Downey, Doras, A.B Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Doyle, Josephine, B.S.H.E Raleigh, R. 5, Wake 

Dozier, Norma, A.B Rocky Mount, Nash 

Earlie, Pamelia, A.B Elizabeth City, Pasquotank 

Easley, Evelyn, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Edwards, Eleanor, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Edwards, Lina Mae, B.S.H.E Fountain, Pitt 

Efird, Margaret, B.S.S.A Albemarle, Stanly 

Efird, Martha, A.B Albemarle, Stanly 

Elliot, Eunice, A.B Erwin, Harnett 

Elliott, Shirley, A.B. Woodland, Northampton 

Ellis, Margaret, B.S.H.E Morrisville, Durham 

Epps, Aida, A.B Chapel Hill, Orange 

Etheridge, Norma, A.B Norfolk, Va. 

Evans, Elva, A.B Murfreesboro, Hertford 

Feiker, June, A.B Washington, D. C. 

Felton, Anne, A.B Hertford, Perquimans 

Ferguson, Elizabeth, A.B Waynesville, R. 2, Haywood 

Ferrell, Muriel, B.S.H.E New York, N. Y. 

Fisher, Anna, B.S.P.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Fisher, Ellen, B.S.P.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Fisher, Jane Grey, B.S.H.E Roseboro, Sampson 

Fleming, Leah, B.S.H.E. Pikeville, Wayne 

Fleming, Martha, B.S.P.E Grimesland, Pitt 

Flowe, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Concord, R. 4, Cabarrus 

Forbes, Susan, B.S.S.A Wilson, Wilson 

Fore, Edith, A.B Chapel Hill, Orange 

Foster, Marjorie, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Fox, Frances, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Franklin, Emily, B.S.S.A Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Frazier, Mary Power, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Frazier, Mary Ross, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Freehof, Joan, A.B Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fryer, Elizabeth, B.S.M Wilmington, New Hanover 

Fuller, Vivian, A.B Creedmoor, R. 1, Granville 

Fulton, Nancy R., B.S.H.E Mt. Airy, Surry 

Furr, Dorothy, A.B. Newton, Catawba 

Gabriel, Margie, B.S.P.E North Wilkesboro, Wilkes 

Gardner, Margaret, A.B Mt. Gilead, Montgomery 



Student List 195 

FRESHMAN CLASS— Continued 

Garner, Anne, B.S.H.E Newport, Carteret 

Gault, Marjolaine, A.B Fairhaven, Mass. 

Geeks, Virginia, A.B Garden City, N. Y. 

Gelston, Marjorie, B.S.S.A Hudson Heights, N. J. 

Gentry, Betty, A.B Spartanburg, S. C. 

Gentry, Martha W., A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Georges, Loualice, A.B Claremont, Catawba 

Gilchrist, Marcia, B.S.H.E Brown Summit, Guilford 

Gill, Ruthana, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Gill, Sarah, A.B Kittrell, R. 1, Franklin 

Gilliam, Margaret, B.S.H.E Sanford, R. 3, Lee 

Gilmore, Marjorie, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Glaze, Mary Frances, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Glenn, Eleanor, B.S.H.E Gatesville, Gates 

Glenn, Mildred, A.B Marion, McDowell 

Goble, Martha, A.B Newton, N. J. 

Godfrey, Cora Page, A.B Raleigh, Wake 

Golden, Jane, A.B Leaksville-Spray, Rockingham 

Gottheimer, Jean, A.B Deirta, R. 2, Mecklenburg 

Grace, Jane, A.B Hazelwood, Haywood 

Grady, Carolyn, A.B Durham, Durham 

Grady, Pauline, A.B Kinston, Lenoir 

Graham, Jessica, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Granowitz, Lucille, A.B New York, N. Y. 

Grantham, Margaret, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Gray, Margaret, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Greenberg, Judith, A.B Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Greene, Dorothy, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Gregson, Carolyn, A.B Arlington, Va. 

Grier, Virginia, B.S.S.A Gastonia, Gaston 

Griffin, Janie Mae, A.B Marshville, R. 2, Union 

Grigsby, Constance, A.B Arlington, Va. 

Gupton, Jean, B.S.P.E Laurinburg, Scotland 

Gwaltney, Helen, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Hagen, Margaret, A.B Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Hair, Jean, A.B Gastonia, Gaston 

Hall, Jean, A.B Wilmington, New Hanover 

Hall, Ruth C, B.S.M Mt. Ulla, Rowan 

Hammer, Mary Louise, A.B Red Bank, N. J. 

Hamrick, Sara Mundy, B.S.H.E Shelby, Cleveland 

Hanchey, Doris, A.B Raleigh, Wake 

Harden, Margaret, B.S.S.A Roanoke Rapids, Halifax 

Hardison, Ann, B.S.S.A Wadesboro, Anson 

Harrell, Edna, A.B Rich Square, Northampton 

Harrell, Marjorie, B.S.P.E Wilson, Wilson 

Harrelson, Martha Jane, B.S.S.A Cherryville, R. 1, Lincoln 

Harrelson, Mildred, B.S.S.A Reidsville, Rockingham 

Harrelson, Sarah Jane, A.B Cherryville, R. 1, Gaston 

Harris, Edna, A.B Candor, Montgomery 

Harris, Martha R., B.S.S.A Sherwood, Watauga 

Harris, Mary Cary, A.B Inez, Warren 

Harris, Mary Will, B.S.H.E Stem, R. 2, Granville 

Harrison, Evelyn, A.B. Whitakers, Nash 

Harrison, Helen, B.S.S.A Plymouth, Washington 

Hart, Nellie, B.S.H.E Oxford, R. 3, Granville 

Heath, Sarah Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Harmony, Iredell 

Henderson, Harriet, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Hendren, Louise, B.S.H.E Carthage, R., Moore 

Hendren, Mary C, B.S.H.E Carthage, R. 3, Moore 

Hendrix, Dorothy, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Hennessee, Carroll, A.B Pinehurst, Moore 

Henry, Doreen, A.B Peekskill, N. Y. 

Henry, Mary Belle, B.S.H.E Rocky Point, Pender 

Herndon, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Hetz, Marjorie, B.S.S.A Charleston, W. Va. 

Hicks, Grace, A.B Manhasset, N. Y. 

Higgins, Helen, B.S.H.E Guilford College, R. 1, Guilford 

Highfill, Loraine, B.S.S.A Coats, Harnett 

Hilton, Hilda, B.S.M Walkertown, Forsyth 

Hinshaw, Miriam, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Hogan, Gaynelle, B.S.H.E Ellerbe, Richmond 

Hoggard, Norma, B.S.P.E Aulander, Bertie 



196 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

FRESHMAN CLASS— Continued 

Hoke, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Kings Mountain, Cleveland 

Holcombe, Jane, B.S.H.E Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Holden, Dorothy, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Holder, Kathryn, B.S.H.E Windsor, Bertie 

Holland, Ellen, A.B Dallas, Gaston 

Hollingsworth, Grace, B.S.H.E Goldsboro, Wayne 

Hollis, Hilda, A.B Concord, Mass. 

Holloway, Carolyn, A.B Washington, D. C. 

Hollowell, Margaret, A.B Rocky Mount, Edgecombe 

Holoman, Judith, A.B Rich Square, Northampton 

Honeycutt, Margaret, A.B. Raleigh, Wake 

Hooks, Jane, B.S.H.E Fremont, Wayne 

Hope, Elaine, B.S.H.E Scranton, Pa. 

Hopkins, Betty Barbara, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Hopkins, Marian, A.B Lexington, Mass. 

Hopkins, Mary Frances, A.B Concord, Cabarrus 

Hoppers, Grace, A.B, Greensboro, Guilford 

Horton, Fay, B.S.H.E Marshville, Union 

Howell, Mary Frances, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Hudson, Charlotte, B.S.H.E Haworth, N. J. 

Hudson, Mary, A.B Morganton, Burke 

Hufham, Helen, B.S.M Morehead City, Carteret 

Hughes, Carrie Ola, A.B Snow Hill, Greene 

Hunt, Margaret, A.B Lexington, Davidson 

Hunter, Rachel, A.B Roxboro, Person 

Hunter, Texie, A.B Tobaccoville, Forsyth 

Hurwitz, Evelyn, B.S.M Clinton, Sampson 

Hutchinson, Sankie, A.B Bladenboro, Bladen 

Irish, Mary Frances, A.B Anniston, Alabama 

Jackson, Mildred, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

James, Winston, A.B Laurinburg, Scotland 

Johnson, Barbara, B.S.P.E New York, N. Y. 

Johnson, Betty, A.B Clifton Forge, Va. 

Johnson, Elizabeth Ann, B.S.H.E. St. Pauls, R. 1, Robeson 

Johnson, Elizabeth D., B.S.H.E Smithfield, Johnston 

Johnson, Elizabeth Finch, A.B Garner, R. 1, Johnston 

Johnson, Irma, A.B. Marion, R. 4, McDowell 

Johnson, Marjory W., B.S.P.E Bunn, Franklin 

Johnson, Rachel, B.S.M Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Jones, Alma Doris, B.S.H.E Zebulon, Wake 

Jones, Katherine, A.B New Bern, Craven 

Jones, Margaret Elizabeth, A.B Greensboro, R. 1, Guilford 

Jones, Muriel, B.S.S.A Siler City, Chatham 

Jordan, Carolyn, B.S.S.A Elizabethtown, Bladen 

Jordan, Jean, B.S.H.E Summit, N. J. 

Jordan, Patience, B.S.S.A Belhaven, Beaufort 

Joyce, Stella Mae, B.S.H.E Mayodan, Rockingham 

Joyner, Frances Scott, B.S.H.E Wilson, R. 2, Wilson 

Kassler, Ethel, B.S.S.A Gaffney, Cherokee 

Kearns, Evelyn, B.S.H.E Randleman, R. 1, Randolph 

Keeter, Georgia, B.S.S.A Morganton, Burke 

Keister, Jane, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Kemp, Helen, B.S.H.E Arlington, Va. 

Kendall, Eleanor, A.B Johns, Scotland 

Ketchie, Mary Owens, B.S.S.A Mt. Ulla, Rowan 

Kimball, Charlotte, A.B Washington, D. C. 

King, Rachel, B.S.S.A. St. Pauls, Robeson 

Kinlaw, Margaret, B.S.H.E Fayetteville, R. 5, Cumberland 

Kirkland, Martha, A.B Wilson, Wilson 

Klages, Virginia, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Klotz, Mildred, A.B Staunton, Virginia 

Knott, Mary Frances, A.B Oxford, R. 2, Granville 

Koonce, Nell, B.S.H.E Raleigh, Wake 

Kortright, Gertrude, B.S.H.E Short Hills, N. J. 

Kreimeier, Shirley, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Kupferer, Harriet, B.S.P.E Paterson, N. J. 

Kutzleb, Adele, A.B Catonsville, Md. 

Ladner, Charlotte, B.S.H.E Paulsboro, N. J. 

Lamb, Elizabeth S., B.S.P.E Kingsville, Md. 

Lambe, Nancy. A.B Walnut Cove, Stokes 



Student List 197 

FRESHMAN CLASS— Continued 

Lancaster, Dorothy, A.B Tarboro, Edgecombe 

Langley, Winifred, B.S.S.A Rocky Mount, Nash 

Larson, Verna, A.B Montclair, N. J. 

Lassiter, Jane, A.B Windsor, Bertie 

Latta, Madeline, B.S.S.A Hillsboro, R. 1, Orange 

Laughridge, Marguerite, A.B Marion, McDowell 

Lazenby, Marguerite, A.B Statesville, Iredell 

Lee, Margaret, B.S.H.E Waxhaw, R. 1, Union 

Leonard, Esta, B.S.S.A Aruba, N. W. I. 

Levinson, Irene, A.B Fairmont, Robeson 

Lewis, Margaret, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Lewis, Martha, A.B Dallas, Gaston 

Lewter, Elsie, B.S.S.A Apex, R. 3, Wake 

Lincoln, Margaret, A.B Tryon, Polk 

Lindsley, Helen, B.S.H.E Williamston, Martin 

Lippard, Ailene, B.S.H.E Lexington, Davidson 

Little, Helen, A.B. Claremont, Catawba 

Liverman, Anne, A.B Plymouth, Washington 

Lockwood, Marguerite, A.B Peekskill, N. Y. 

Lohr, Frances, A.B Lexington, Davidson 

Lohr, Virginia, B.S.H.E Charlotte, R. 5, Mecklenburg 

Long, Margaret, A.B Pinetops, R. 1, Edgecombe 

Long, Rachel, B.S.S.A Bahama, Durham 

Lore, Mary, A.B Smithfield, Johnston 

Lorraine, Margaret, B.S.H.E Richmond, Va. 

Love, Aurilla, A.B Elizabeth City, Pasquotank 

Lovelace, Anne, A.B Macclesfield, Edgecombe 

Lowder, Doris, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Lybrand, Dora, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Lynch, Muriel, A.B Berkshire, N. Y. 

Lyon, Marguerite, A.B North Side, Granville 

McAdams, Dorothy, B.S.P.E Rougemont, Durham 

McCall, Mary Hope, A.B Elizabeth City, Pasquotank 

McCrillis, Natalie, B.S.H.E North Conway, N. H. 

McCulloch, Jane, B.S.S.A. Elizabethtown, Bladen 

McDaniel, Dorothy, B S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

McDonald, Beth, B.S.H.E Timberland, Hoke 

McGehee, Nell, A.B Macon, Georgia 

McKeithan, Rebecca, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

McKenzie, Grace, B.S.H.E Rockingham, Richmond 

McKenzie, Jeanne, A.B Rockingham, Richmond 

McKinnon, Jean, B.S.H.E Mt. Gilead, Montgomery 

McLaurin, Eloise, B.S.H.E Fayetteville, R. 1, Cumberland 

McLean, Mary Edna, A.B Rockingham, Richmond 

McLean, Sara, B.S.H.E Salisbury, Rowan 

McManus, Nelle, B.S.M. Hamlet, Richmond 

McPherson, Doris, B.S.P.E Cameron, Moore 

McPherson, Dorothy Mae, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Madry. Ruby, B.S.S.A Rich Square, Northampton 

Mandel, Sarah, A.B New York, N. Y. 

Maness, Aleen, A.B Carthage, R. 1, Moore 

Maness, Juanita, A.B Carthage, R. 1, Moore 

Mangum, Helen, A.B Chalybeate Springs, Harnett 

Mangum, Sue, B.S.S.A Raleigh, R. 1, Wake 

Marshall, Helen, B.S.H.E Rose Hill, Duplin 

Marshall, Marilyn, B.S.S.A Garden City, L. I., N. Y. 

Martin, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Martin, Frances C, A.B Smithfield, Johnston 

Martin, S. Frances, B.S.S.A Dunn, Harnett 

Martin, Mae, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Mason, Shirley, B.S.H.E Beaufort, Carteret 

Mathes, Ruth, B.S.M Durham, Durham 

Matthews, Clair, B.S.S.A Engelhard, Hyde 

Matthews, Dorothy L., A.B ! Leaksville, Rockingham 

Matthews, Mary E., B.S.S.A Stoneville, Rockingham 

Mattox, Susie, B.S.P.E Pinetops, Edgecombe 

Mauney, Virginia, A.B. Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

May, Audrey, A.B Pittsfield, Mass. 

Mebane, Julia, A.B Davidson, Mecklenburg 

Medford, Anna, A.B Waynesville, Haywood 

Meekins, Maxine, B.S.S.A Manteo, Dare 



198 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

FRESHMAN CLASS— Continued 

Mendelhall, Cynthia, B.S.S.A Asheboro, Randolph 

Merritt, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Hickory, Catawba 

Messick, Ruth, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Metzger, Gloria, A.B Ashton, Md. 

Michael, La Velle, B.S.H.E Kernersville, R. 2, Forsyth 

Middleton, Marion, A.B. Greensboro, Guilford 

Minnis, Jeanette, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Minor, La Vada, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Mitchell, Alice, A.B Aulander, Bertie 

Mitchell, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Wake Forest, Wake 

Mitchell, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Reidsville, Rockingham 

Moore, Alice, B.S.H.E Weldon, Halifax 

Moore, Dorris, B.S.H.E Williamston, Martin 

Moore, Esther, A.B Old Greenwich, Conn. 

Moore, Gertrude, B.S.H.E Mocksville, R. 2, Davie 

Moore, Rachel, A.B JBurlington, Alamance 

Morgan, Joan, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Morrison, Dorothy, A.B Franklin, Macon 

Morton, Penelope, B.S.S.A New Bern, Craven 

Morton, Wilma, A.B Albemarle, Stanly 

Mozingo, Helen, A.B Selma, Johnston 

Muller, Octavia, A.B Dillon, S. C. 

Mulligan, Barbara, A.B. Greensboro, Guilford 

Mumford, Ann, A.B Washington, Beaufort 

Murdoch, Delia, A.B Salisbury, Rowan 

Murray, Jane, B.S.S.A Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Murray, Roma, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Myers, Mary Frances, B.S.S.A Ahoskie, Hertford 

Neal, Jane, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Neal, Mary Elizabeth, A.B Anniston, Ala. 

Neal, Rebecca, B.S.H.E Southern Pines, Moore 

Nelme, Nona, A.B Wadesboro, R. 2, Anson 

Neville, Ella, A.B Rocky Mount, Edgecombe 

Neville, Miriam, B.S.S.A Enfield, Halifax 

Newbold, Nita, B.S.S.A Hertford, Perquimans 

Newell, Jane, B.S.H.E Henderson, Vance 

Newton, Elizabeth, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Nicholls, Marion, B.S.S.A Scranton, Pa. 

Norcom, Dorothy, B.S.M Red Bank, N. J. 

Norman, Geraldine, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Norman, Margaret, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Northup, Gwynne, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Nottingham, Ruth, A.B Norfolk, Va. 

Odum, Dorothy, A.B New Bern, Craven 

Ogburn, Sara Nell, A.B Sanford, R. 1, Lee 

Olsen, Arlene, B.S.H.E Bay City, Mich. 

Oswald, Genevieve, B.S.M Buffalo, N. Y. 

Owen, Carita, B.S.H.E Roseboro, Sampson 

Owen, Elizabeth, B.S.S.A Thomasville, Davidson 

Owen, Mary Ellen, A.B Fayetteville, R. 3, Cumberland 

Owens, Ruth, A.B Columbia, Tyrrell 

Padgett, Myrt, B.S.M Hayesville, Clay 

Palmer, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Palmer, Margaret, B.S.P.E Hilton Village, Va. 

Palmer, Mary, A.B Tryon, Polk 

Parker, Eunice, A.B High Point, Guilford 

Parker, Olive, B.S.M Leaksville, Rockingham 

Parker, Phyllis Anne, A.B Smithfield, Johnston 

Patrick, Etta, B.S.H.E Durham, Durham 

Patterson, Ellanor, A.B Greenville, S. C. 

Paul, Gloria, B.S.S.A Washington, Beaufort 

Pearce, Anna, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Pearce, Elizabeth, B.S.P.E Zebulon, Wake 

Peele, Barbara, B.S.P.E Springfield, Mass. 

Pepper, Julia, A.B Walnut Cove, Stokes 

Perkins, Elizabeth, B.S.H.E Reidsville, Rockingham 

Perry, Betty, A.B Towson, Md. 

Perry, Kirk, A.B Wallace, Duplin 

Perry, Martha, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Pettus, Mary Anne, B.S.H.E Media, Pa. 



Student List 199 

FRESHMAN CLASS— Continued 

Petzold, Katherine, B.S.H.E Newark Valley, N. Y. 

Pfaff, Flora, B.S.H.E Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Phillips, Carol, A.B. Great Neck, N. Y. 

Pierce, Elizabeth, A.B Winchester, Virginia 

Pilley, Rosalie, B.S.M Pantego, Beaufort 

Pinkston, Ella Marie, A.B Salisbury, Rowan 

Pitoniak, Anne, A.B Westfield, Mass. 

Pitts, Anne, B.S.H.E Oxford, R. 2, Granville 

Pleasants, Lelia, B.S.M Durham, Durham 

Poole, Judith, A.B St. Pauls, Robeson 

Poore, Louise, A.B Mount Airy, Surry 

Porter, Ruth, A.B Herkimer, N. Y. 

Poteat, Evangeline, B.S.P.E Bakersville, Mitchell 

Powell, Aulene, B.S.H.E Denton, R. 1, Davidson 

Powell, Betty Lou, A.B Leland, Brunswick 

Pratt, Rebecca, B.S.H.E Winston-Salem, R. 1, Forsyth 

Pressly, Elizabeth, B.S.P.E. Belmont, Gaston 

Presson, Silvey Ann, B.S.S.A Wilmington, New Hanover 

Price, Gloria, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Price, Ruby, B.S.H.E Ellenboro, Rutherford 

Pridgen, Lewis, B.S.S.A Elm City, Wilson 

Prior, Jean, B.S.S.A New Bern, Craven 

Pritchett, Alice, B.S.H.E Charlottesville, Va. 

Purvis, Belle Hicks, B.S.H.E Salisbury, Rowan 

Queen, Sara, B.S.H.E Waynesville, Haywood 

Quick, Betty, B.S.S.A Mamaroneck, N. Y. 

Radford, Frances, B.S.P.E Decatur, Ga. 

Rahenkamp, Geneva, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Rankin, Eloise, B.S.S.A High Point, Guilford 

Rankin, Margie, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Ratliff, Sara, A.B Wadesboro, R. 3, Anson 

Ratterree, Margaret, A.B Kings Mountain, Cleveland 

Reaben, Claire Belle, A.B Hendersonville, Henderson 

Reeder, Jane, B.S.H.E Carlsbad, N. M. 

Reeves, Emoryetta, A.B Sparta, Alleghany 

Regan, Katie Lee, B.S.H.E Lumberton, R. 1, Robeson 

Reinhardt, Evelyn, B.S.H.E Newton, R. 1, Catawba 

Rendleman, Mary Jo, A.B Anna, Illinois 

Reynolds, Rose, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Rhyne, Kathleen, A.B Aberdeen, Moore 

Rice, Sarah, B.S.H.E Hurdle Mills, Person 

Rich, Drina, A.B Port Washington, N. Y. 

Richardson, Doris, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Riden, Joy, A.B Boonville, Yadkin 

Riggsbee, Meredith, B.S.M Durham, Durham 

Rimmer, Anna Frances, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Riser, Serena, B.S.P.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Rivenbark, Frances, A.B Wallace, Duplin 

Roberts, Betsy, B.S.H.E Shelby, Cleveland 

Robertson, Mary Catherine, A.B Wake Forest, R. 2, Wake 

Robinson, Marjorie, A.B Bronxville, N. Y. 

Rogers, Agnes, A.B Creedmoor, Granville 

Rogers, Elizabeth, A.B Wilson, Wilson 

Rogers, Maxine, A.B Creedmoor, Granville 

Rosa, Anna, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Rosen, Natalie, A.B High Point, Guilford 

Ross, Alice, B.S.H.E New Bern, Craven 

Ross, Thora, B.S.S.A Belhaven, Beaufort 

Rotha, Charline, B.S.P.E. Waynesville, Haywood 

Rountree, Sara, A.B Kinston, Lenoir 

Rouse, Elise, A.B Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Rowe, Terreisa, B.S.S.A Hickory, Catawba 

Rowe, Vaune, B.S.H.E Lumberton, Robeson 

Ruddock, Sue, B.S.H.E Kings Mountain, Cleveland 

Ruffin, Barbara, A.B Wilson, Wilson 

Ryerson, Jeannette, A.B Red Bank, N. J. 

Saint Peter, Virginia, A.B. Hohokus, N. J. 

Sanders, Helen, A.B Roxboro, Person 

Sanderson, Jessie, B.S.H.E Pink Hill, Duplin 

Sargent, Polly, B.S.S.A Mt. Airy, Surry 

Saunders, Betsy, A.B High Point, Guilford 



200 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

FRESHMAN CLASS— Continued 

Sawyer, Martha, A.B Elizabeth City, Pasquotank 

Scarborough, Miriam, A.B Mt. Gilead, Montgomery 

Schenck, M. Ann, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Schlosser, Jean, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Schreiber, Hilda, A.B Washington, D. C. 

Schrum, Kathryne, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Schumann, Rae, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Scott, Jean, A.B^ Greensboro, Guilford 

Searcy, Susan, A.B Bat Cave, Henderson 

Sears, Dorothy, B.S.H.E Longmeadow, Mass. 

Sears, Sara, A.B High Point, Guilford 

Self, Mary, A.B Lincolnton, Lincoln 

Sessoms, Gladys, A.B Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Severance, Dorotha, A.B. Gastonia, Gaston 

Shallington, Mary Elizabeth, B.S.P.E Columbia, Tyrrell 

Sharpe, Helen, A.B Greensboro, R. 4, Guilford 

Sharpe, Mary, A.B Greensboro, R. 4, Guilford 

Sherrill, Margaret, B.S.H.E Mt. Ulla, Rowan 

Shields, Charlotte, A.B Chapel Hill, Orange 

Shinn, Malvena, B.S.H.E Cleveland, R. 1, Rowan 

Shulman, Ruth, A.B Bronx, N. Y. 

Shump, Katherine, A.B Edenton, Chowan 

Sibley, Elsie, A.B Montclair, N. J, 

Siler, Mary Lane, B.S.H.E Siler City, Chatham 

Silver, Shirley, A.B High Point, Guilford 

Simmons, Mildred, B.S.M Winston-Salem, R. 3, Forsyth 

Skinner, Clara, B.S.S.A Sumter, S. C. 

Slaughter, Margaret, A.B Lynchburg, Va. 

Slaughter, Vesta, B.S.H.E. Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Sledge, Katherine, A.B Pinehurst, Moore 

Sloat, Marion, A.B Ridgewood, N. J. 

Slocum, Grace, A.B Wilmington, New Hanover 

Sloop, Virginia, A.B Mooresville, Iredell 

Smith, Dorothy, A.B Fremont, R. 1, Wayne 

Smith, Edna Lee, A.B Clinton, Sampson 

Smith, Elizabeth F., A.B Wilmington, New Hanover 

Smith, Evelyn, A.B Old Greenwich, Conn. 

Smith, Florence D., A.B Greensboro, R. 3, Guilford 

Smith, Jean G., B.S.M Greensboro, Guilford 

Smith, Marie, B.S.H.E Varina, Harnett 

Smith, Marjorie Ann, B.S.H.E Fremont, Wayne 

Smith, Regina, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Smithey, Rowena, B.S.S.A Raleigh, Wake 

Sofley, Nancy. B.S.S.A Asheville, Buncombe 

Solomon, Nancy, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Sorrell, Betty, A.B Morrisville, R. 1, Durham 

Spivey, Anne, A.B. Rich Square, R., Northampton 

Stadiem, Marjorie, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Stahl, Betty Jean, B.S.P.E Laurinburg, Scotland 

Stanley, Margaret, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Stanton, Harriett, B.S.H.E Washington, D. C. 

Stark, Marilyn Mae, B.S.S.A Buffalo, N. Y. 

Starling, Flossie, A.B Pine Level, Johnston 

Steers, Dorothy, A.B White Plains, N. Y. 

Stephenson, Margaret, A.B Pendleton, Northampton 

Stokes, Regina, A.B Greenville, Georgia 

Stone, Frances, B.S.S.A Morrisville, R. 1, Durham 

Stout, Jean, A.B Sparta, N. J. 

Stowe, Florence, A.B. Washington, Beaufort 

Strickland, Aline, B.S.H.E Stedman, Cumberland 

Strickland, Susie, B.S.H.E Louisburg, R. 1, Franklin 

Stringfield, Emily, A.B Stamford, Conn. 

Strong, Victoria, A.B Larchmont, N. Y. 

Sturtevant, Judith, B.S.P.E Baltimore, Md. 

Styron, Frances, A.B Goldsboro, Wayne 

Sullivan, Rebecca, B.S.S.A Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Supplee, Ruth Evelyn. A.B Haddon Heights, N. J. 

Surles, Mary, A.B Roseboro, R. 1, Sampson 

Sutton, Rowena, B.S.S.A. Dunn, Harnett 

Swaim, Merle, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Sweeney, Constance, A.B Rocky Mount, Edgecombe 

Talley, Lucia, A.B Lewiston, Bertie 

Tally, Naomi, A.B Sanatorium, Hoke 



Student List 201 

FRESHMAN CLASS— Continued 

Tanner, Gertrude, B.S.S.A. Henderson, Vance 

Tanner, Helen, B.S.P.E Springfield, Mass. 

Tapp, Margaret, B.S.H.E Raeford, R. 2, Hoke 

Tate, Lillian, B.S.H.E Gastonia, Gaston 

Tayloe, Helen, A.B Ahoskie, R. 2, Hertford 

Tayloe, Pauline, A.B Aulander, Bertie 

Taylor, Lydia, A.B Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Taylor, Maurine, B.S.S.A Black Creek, Wilson 

Taylor, Ruth Marie, A.B Bolivia, Brunswick 

Teague, Kate, B.S.H.E Fairmont, Robeson 

Terry, Barbara, A.B New Canaan, Conn. 

Therrell, Sarah, B.S.P.E Burlington, Alamance 

Thigpen, Mary Frances, A.B Mt. Olive, Wayne 

Thomas, Wilna June, A.B Shallotte, Brunswick 

Thomason, Margaret, B.S.H.E. Lexington, R. 5, Davidson 

Thompson, Jane, B.S.S.A Henderson, Vance 

Thompson, Ruth, A.B Mountain Park, Surry 

Todd, Virginia, B.S.H.E Fairfield, Conn. 

Toler, Evelyn, A.B Rocky Mount, Nash 

Truelove, Hilda, A.B Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Tucker, Marie, B.S.H.E Peachland, R. 2, Anson 

Tunnell, Lois, A.B Swan Quarter, Hyde 

Turlington, Dorothy, A.B Goldsboro, Wayne 

Turner, Jeanne, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Turner, Nan, B.S.M Mt. Ulla, Rowan 

Tuttle, Rose Marie, B.S.H.E Tobaccoville, Forsyth 

Tuttle, Sara, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Tyson, Mary Thorne, A.B Farmville, Pitt 

Umstead, Mary Edna, A.B Durham, Durham 

Vail, Margaret, B.S.H.E Pikeville, Wayne 

Valente, Jane, A.B Pawling, N. Y. 

Varner, Mary Frances, A.B Greensboro, Guilford 

Vinson, Helen, A.B Mount Olive, Wayne 

Wade, Lillie, B.S.H.E Lexington, R. 2, Davidson 

Wade, Marie, B.S.M Dunn, Harnett 

Wagoner, Margaret Ellen, B.S.H.E Gibsonville, R. 1, Guilford 

Waldrop, Suzanne, A.B Kinston, R. 2, Lenoir 

Walker, Anne, B.S.S.A Morganton, Burke 

Walker, Elaine, A.B Fremont, Wayne 

Walker, Jean, B.S.P.E Burlington, R. 2, Alamance 

Walter, Marjorie, A.B Lansdowne, Pa. 

Ward, Fanny, B.S.P.E Columbia, Tyrrell 

Ward, Mildred, A.B Edenton, Chowan 

Warren, Helen, A.B Benson, Johnston 

Warren, Martha, A..B Burlington, Alamance 

Warren, Mary Means, A.B Sparta, Alleghany 

Warwick, Sara Elizabeth, A.B Bethlehem, Pa. 

Watkins, Lydia, B.S.H.E Blanche, Caswell 

Watson, Janie Lee, A.B Raleigh, Wake 

Waynick, Ellene, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Weathers, Lillian, B.S.H.E Wake Forest, Wake 

Weaver, Myda, A.B Edenton, Chowan 

Webb, Jane, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Webster, Ann L., B.S.M Greensboro, Guilford 

Webster, Anne, B.S.S.A Madison, Rockingham 

Welles, Elizabeth, B.S.M Pittsboro, Chatham 

Wertz, Martha, B.S.M Landis, Rowan 

Whisnant, Clara, A.B Morganton, R. 1, Burke 

Whisnant, Laura, B.S.H.E Henrietta, Rutherford 

White, Carolyn M., B.S.S.A Roxboro, Person 

White, Florence, B.S.H.E Greensboro, R. 2, Guilford 

White, Ruth, B.S.P.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Whitehurst, Louise, B.S.S.A Conetoe, Edgecombe 

Whitley, Mary Hazel, A.B Raeford, Hoke 

Wicker, Eloise, A.B Pinehurst, Moore 

Wilkins, Brockett, B.S.S.A Wilson, Wilson 

Wilkins, Edna Mae, B.S.H.E Edenton,' Chowan 

Willey, Marjorie, B.S.S.A Enfield, R. 1, Halifax 

Williams, Betty, B.S.H.E White Plains, N. Y. 

Williams, Gail, B.S.H.E East Bend, Yadkin 



202 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

FRESHMAN CLASS— Continued 

Williams, Martha, A.B Cullen, Virginia 

Williamson, Frances, B.S.H.E Turkey, Sampson 

Williamson, Mary Ella, A.B Asheville, Buncombe 

Winchell, Nancy, B.S.S.A Severna Park, Md. 

Winecoff, Ann, B.S.S.A Albemarle, Stanly 

Wolfe, Jewel, B.S.S.A Spencer, Rowan 

Womack, Sarah, B.S.S.A Leasburg, Caswell 

Womble, Mildred, B.S.H.E Ashley Heights, Hoke 

Wood, Caroline, A.B Monroe, Union 

Wood, Elizabeth B., A.B Progress, Pa. 

Woolley, Patricia, A.B New York, N. Y. 

Worsley, Jeanne, B.S.S.A. Bridgeport, Conn. 

Wyatt, Martha, B.S.H.E Hobgood, Halifax 

Wygant, Jeanne, A.B Baltimore, Md. 

Yates, Jean, B.S.H.E Greensboro, Guilford 

Yoffe, Ruth, A.B Manning, S. C. 

York, Nancy, B.S.S.A Greensboro, Guilford 

Young, Delice, A.B Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Young, Mary Frances, B.S.P.E Durham, Durham 

Zimmerman, Jean, A.B Bolton, Columbus 



COMMERCIAL STUDENTS 

Abernethy, Jane Crowell Greensboro, Guilford 

Alexander, Frances Elizabeth Karrisburg, Cabarrus 

Applewhite, Grace Greensboro, Guilford 

Ballenberger, Sarabelle Hamlet, Richmond 

Bangle, Catherine L Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Barrier, Beverly Charlotte, R. 7, Mecklenburg 

Baum, Geraldine Fairfield, Hyde 

Beck, Virginia C Lexington, R. 2, Davidson 

Bender, Selma Norlina, R. 2, Warren 

Benson, Mary Hannah Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Bentley, Janice Minerva Greensboro, Guilford 

Berry, Emily Ruth Durham, Durham 

Brown, Margaret Lee Greensboro, Guilford 

Cagle, Evelyn Margaret Greensboro, Guilford 

Campbell, Evelyn Asheville, Buncombe 

Capel, Mary Catherine Ellerbe, Richmond 

Caroon, Mary Gaskill New Bern, Craven 

Carpenter, Barbara Stanfield, Stanly 

Carr, Doris Greensboro, Guilford 

Carter, Gloria Edith Leaksville, Rockingham 

Carter, Mary E Morganton, Burke 

Carter, Mary Helen Stoneville, R. 2, Rockingham 

Cashatt, Olgie Alline Badin, Stanly 

Castleberry, Margaret Apex, Wake 

Cates, Lillie Chapel Hill, Orange 

Causey, Nancy Scott Greensboro, Guilford 

Cavin, Mary Helen Troutman, Iredell 

Chandler, Elizabeth Greensboro, R. 4, Guilford 

Chisholm, Sarah Ann Greensboro, Guilford 

Chisholm, Tommae Mae Star, Montgomery 

Coiner, Billie Greensboro, Guilford 

Cole, Anne Greensboro, Guilford 

Coltrane, Marilyn M Smithfield, Johnston 

Cook, Carolyn Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Cornelius, Sarah Greensboro, Guilford 

Crutchfield, Ora Virginia Greensboro, Guilford 

Davis, Evelyn Drake Fayetteville, R. 7, Bladen 

Davis, Ruth Carolyn Lexington, Davidson 

Dean, Dorothy Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Devenish, Cecile Frances Asheville, Buncombe 

Dixon, Alma Henderson, Vance 

Downer, Josephine Lilesville, Anson 

Draughon, Emma Jane Dunn, Harnett 



Student List 203 

COMMERCIAL STUDENTS— Continued 

Elam, Mary Evelyn Statesville, R. 4, Iredell 

Elkins, Billie Greensboro, Guilford 

Ellington, Syble Louvenia Reidsville, Rockingham 

Emanuel, Mary Greensboro, Guilford 

Everett, Kathryn Ann Greensboro, Guilford 

Faggart, Helen Ruby Concord, R. 2, Cabarrus 

Falls, Rebecca Shelby, Cleveland 

Fentress, Frances O Greensboro, Guilford 

Fentress, Thelma A Greensboro, Guilford 

Flowers, Gretchen Greensboro, Guilford 

Fouts, Margaret Elois Lexington, R. 2, Davidson 

Fox, Doris Siler City, Chatham 

Frazure, Carolyn Virginia Greensboro, Guilford 

Friddle, Norma Stokesdale, R. 2, Rockingham 

Furqueron, Frances Henderson, Vance 

Gaither, Nell Rocky Mount, Nash 

Gill, Elwyna Oxford, R. 5, Granville 

Gillikin, Sybil Justine New Bern, Craven 

Gornto, Vashti Lumberton, Robeson 

Gravely, Emily Woodsdale, Person 

Greer, Aline Lucile Morganton, Burke 

Grimes, Marion Gray Smithfield, Johnston 

Harbison, Susan Ruth Morganton, Burke 

Hardage, Hilda Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Hardin, Bobbie Shell Hickory, Catawba 

Harding, Anice Bright Washington, Beaufort 

Harrell, Constance Elaine Wilmington, New Hanover 

Harrill, Alice Cleveland Rutherfordton, Rutherford 

Harris, Betsy Lexington, Davidson 

Harrison, Marian Oxford, Granville 

Hartsell, Hazelene Mt. Gilead, Montgomery 

Hasty, Emily Monroe, Union 

Hedrick, Mary Ivan Lexington, R. 2, Davidson 

Hill, Billie Bob Hamlet, Richmond 

Hines, Lois Stony Point, Alexander 

Hunt, Joan Greensboro, Guilford 

James, Frances Hardin Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Jarvis, Myrtle Concord, Cabarrus 

Jones, Joyce M Mount Olive, Wayne 

Jones, Mamie Olivia Red Oak, Nash 

Jones, Vivian Bryan Garner, Wake 

Kittner, Dorothy Ruth Weldon, Halifax 

Lane, Edith Marie Morganton, Burke 

Leatherwood, Louise Lake Junaluska, Haywood 

Lindeman, Frances DeVane Greensboro, Guilford 

Linville, Jr.anita Oak Ridge, Guilford 

Long, Bettie Frances Washington, Beaufort 

McCauley, Eleanor Greensboro, Guilford 

McCormick, Myrtle Greensboro, Guilford 

McCullers, Marguerite Asheboro, Randolph 

McDonald, Eugenia Reidsville, Rockingham 

McDonald, Katherine Wake Forest, Wake 

McLendon, Sara Polk Morven, Anson 

McMillan, Julia Elizabeth Greensboro, Guilford 

Manning, Dorothy Britton Williamston, Martin 

Midkiff, Dora Mildred Mount Airy, Surry 

Moore, Mary Elizabeth Weldon, Halifax 

Myatt, Louise Randolph Smithfield, Johnston 

Nance, Mary C. (Mrs.) Greensboro, Guilford 

Newman, Joyce Greensboro, Guilford 

Nicholson, Vada Durham, Durham 

Nicholson, Zada Durham, Durham 

Odom, Helen James Laurinburg, Scotland 



204 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

COMMERCIAL STUDENTS— Continued 

Palmer, Corneille Parsons Rockingham, Richmond 

Pittman, June Garrett Cordova, Richmond 

Pope, Betty Lou Randleman, Randolph 

Price, Ruth Monroe, Union 

Rice, Tulline Jonesboro, R. 4, Lee 

Rose, Carolyn Benson, Johnston 

Ross, Doris Leta Wilmington, New Hanover 

Rudd, Hester Greensboro, Guilford 

Rush, Jane Sanford, Lee 

Scarborough, Miriam Mount Gilead, Montgomery 

Scruggs, Leonelle Asheville, Buncombe 

Self, Juanita Greensboro, R. 2, Guilford 

Shannon, Lydia Waxhaw, Union 

Sheppard, Rebecca Greensboro, Guilford 

Shuford, Maude Hickory, Catawba 

Sigmon, Margaret Irene Greensboro, Guilford 

Sink, Gloria Lexington, R. 5, Davidson 

Smith, Eloise Ross Wadesboro, R. 1, Anson 

Smith, Helen Ruth Greensboro, Guilford 

Smith, Miriam Greensboro, Guilford 

Sparger, Susan B Mount Airy, Surry 

Sparrow, Mary Louise Chapel Hill, Orange 

Speros, Catherine Maxton, Robeson 

Stacey, Louise Rutherfordton, Rutherford 

Styers, Ida Frances Greensboro, Guilford 

Sutton, Frances Stokes Monroe, Union 

Swindell, Mary Louise Swan Quarter, Hyde 

Taylor, Sadie Rebecca Guilford College, R. 1, Guilford 

Thompson, Sarah Roanoke Rapids, Halifax 

Throckmorton, Betty Frances Reidsville, Rockingham 

Toon, Mary Bryan Whiteville, Columbus 

Tucker, Margaret Lucile Madison, Rockingham 

Wagner, Charleen Asheville, Buncombe 

Walker, Doris Burlington, R. 2, Alamance 

Walker, Sara Kathryn Monroe, Union 

Waiters, Lillian Clare Asheville, Buncombe 

Waynick, Mary Agenline Greensboro, R. 5, Guilford 

Wells, Carol Eunice Greensboro, Guilford 

Wilkie, Anna Mae Moncure, Chatham 

Wilson, Mable Carter Hamlet, Richmond 

Wood, Elizabeth Four Oaks, R. 3, Johnston 

Woollen, Mary Ruth High Point, Guilford 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Alderman, Sara A High Point, Guilford 

Allen, Harriet Asheville, Buncombe 

Board, Barbara Greensboro, Guilford 

Brown, Blanche Dupuy (Mrs.) Greensboro, Guilford 

Brownlee, Jean Greensboro, Guilford 

Brummitt, Mary Oxford, R. 2, Granville 

Caldwell, Margaret Greensboro, Guilford 

Carmichail, Dorothy Bowling Green, Ohio 

Carter, Virginia Blair Greensboro, Guilford 

Chandler, Helen K. (Mrs.) Oak Ridge, Guilford 

Cooke, Elizabeth P Florence, South Carolina 

Cummings, Dorothy High Point, Guilford 

Cuthrell, Barbara Goldsboro, Wayne 

Davis, Dorothy Greensboro, Guilford 

Davis Nell Greensboro, Guilford 

Evans, Grace McCraw (Mrs.) Greensboro, Guilford 

Farrell, Peter Greensboro, Guilford 

Field, Rosa (Mrs.) Greensboro, Guilford 

Fletcher, Margaret Greensboro, Guilford 



Student List 205 

SPECIAL STUDENTS— Continued 

Flickinger, Carolyn Eagle Springs, Moore 

Foushee, Mrs. Eugene Greensboro, Guilford 

Foushee, Mary Ann Greensboro, Guilford 

Frazier, Lucette Greensboro, Guilford 

Garrett, Betty Greensboro, Guilford 

Gill, Ruth Kittrell, Franklin 

Ginnings, Reva R. (Mrs.) Greensboro. Guilford 

Harvey, Mrs. E. T Greensboro, Guilford 

Hamrick, Elizabeth Greensboro, Guilford 

Higgins, Mrs. V. B Greensboro, Guilford 

Highfill, Pearl Guilford College, Guilford 

Hilford, Grace Naples, Henderson 

Hobgood, Lutie (Mrs.) Greensboro, Guilford 

Hoye, Anna Scott Greensboro, Guilford 

Hunt, Florence C Greensboro, Guilford 

Jamieson, Eleanor (Mrs.) Greensboro, Guilford 

Johnson, Audrey Biltmore, Buncombe 

King, Mary Elizabeth Greensboro, Guilford 

Love, Mrs. J. Spencer Greensboro, Guilford 

McDuffie, Lena K. (Mrs.) Greensboro, Guilford 

McFalls, Frederick Greensboro, Guilford 

Minhinnette, Martha Greensboro, Guilford 

Morrison, Geneva Greensboro, Guilford 

Moser, Margaret Greensboro, Guilford 

Olson, Hazel R Greensboro, Guilford 

Pettygrew, Kathryn E. (Mrs.) Greensboro, R. 4, Guilford 

Richardson, Thaxton, Jr Greensboro, Guilford 

Rudd, Edith Greensboro, Guilford 

Sanford, Elsie Greensboro, Guilford 

Schenck, Vincent Gastonia, Gaston 

Sellars, Mrs. Baxter Greensboro, Guilford 

Sharp, Evelyn High Point, Guilford 

Smith, A. Marie Greensboro, Guilford 

Smith, Mary Jean Greensboro, Guilford 

Smith, Mozelle Olive (Mrs.) Greensboro, Guilford 

Southard, Rebecca Greensboro, Guilford 

Stallings, Mildred Guilford College, Guilford 

Stanford, Lydia Greensboro, Guilford 

Street, Jane Greensboro, Guilford 

Teague, Houston Greensboro, Guilford 

Thomas, Blossom H. (Mrs.) Greensboro, Guilford 

Thomas, Elena (Mrs.) Greensboro, Guilford 

Tyler, Dorothy, (Mrs.) Greensboro, Guilford 

White, Mrs. H. R Greensboro, Guilford 

White, Wilhelmina (Mrs.) Greensboro, Guilford 

Wills, Anna Greensboro, Guilford 

Wolff, Sanford T. (Mrs.) Greensboro, Guilford 

SUMMER SESSION, 1939 

Abernathy, Charlotte M. (Mrs.) Sanford 

Adcock, Elizabeth Hutto (Mrs.) Lexington 

Alexander, Louise Huntersville 

Alexander, Mary Neil R. 1, Matthews 

Allen, Carol Warehouse Point, Conn. 

Allison, Ola Columbus, Ohio 

Alton, Grace R. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Anderson, Carrie A Washington College, Tenn. 

Anderson, Margaret N Asheville 

Andrews, Alice R. 1, Mt. Gilead 



206 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

SUMMER SESSION, 1939— Continued 

Andrews, Irene R. 2, Graham 

Angel, Falsom Neal (Mrs.) Stokesdale 

Angel, Jane Hatchett (Mrs.) Stokesdale 

Apple, Florence R. 1, Greensboro 

Armentrout, Shirley Goldsboro 

Ayscue, Mary Evelyn R. l, Kittrell 

Bain, Mrytle Greensboro 

Baker, Charles R Greensboro 

Baker, Margie N Greenville, S. C. 

Baldwin, Betty Lee Greensboro 

Barber, Kathleen Hall Burlington 

Barker, Margaret Milton 

Barksdale, Anne Sumter, S. C. 

Barksdale, Beverly Greensboro 

Barrier, Mary Louise R. 3, Concord 

Beasley, Carrie Lee R. 1, Four Oaks 

Beasley, Fleata Greensboro 

Beckwith, Winifred Roanoke Rapids 

Bell, Laura Maysville 

Bell, Mary Parks Mooresville 

Bell, Rebecca R. 1, Rocky Mount 

Benbow, Marjorie Greensboro 

Bennett, Anne R. 2, Greensboro 

Best, Fay R. 3, Conway, S. C. 

Biddle, Jessica T. (Mrs.) New Bern 

Biles, Elizabeth Albemarle 

Bingham, Blanche Sugar Grove 

Black, Julia Woodson (Mrs.) Durham 

Blakely, Melle Cornelius 

Blanchard, Alice Hobbsville 

Blumenthal, Dorothy Franklin 

Boger, Virginia Albemarle 

Bostick, May Presly , Laurinburg 

Bowden, Lorraine Mocksville 

Bowles, Iris Southern (Mrs.) Walnut Cove 

Boyd, Carol Belhaven 

Boyd, Ethel G. (Mrs.) Reidsville 

Boyd, Ethel Miller R. 3, Monroe 

Boyles, Sarah Greensboro 

Bracey, Mrs. Clarence Rowland 

Bradley, Mary Katherine Greensboro 

Brady, May Parsons (Mrs.) Randleman 

Bratcher, Faye (Mrs.) Demorest, Ga. 

Brewer, Alma Lee R. 2, Polkton 

Brewer, Carrie Craft Siler City 

Brewer, Mary Ruth Hemp 

Bridges, Gladys Greenville, S. C. 

Briggs, Olive V Burnsville 

Briles, Mary Lee High Point 

Brisson, Louise , Lumberton 

Brockman, Hazel Winston-Salem 

Brower, Mrs. J. F Clemmons 

Brown, Adelaide J Asheville 

Brown, Dorothy M Tarboro 

Brown, Eloise G Lynchburg, Va. 

Brown, Evelyn H R. 2, Rocky Mount 

Browne, Nancy E Wilson 

Browning, Hazel R. 1, Stony Point 

Buhman, Elizabeth Greensboro 

Buie, Eloise Denmark, S. C. 

Burch, Eloise Walstonburg 

Burgess, Mary Ravenel Durham 

Burton, Marie Weaverville 

Butler, Rebecca St. Pauls 

Bynum, Mrs. J. N Roanoke Rapids 

Calvert, Florence Black Mountain 

Cameron, Sara Margaret Olivia 

Campbell, Jean Lakewood, Ohio 

Campbell, Lucille R. 2, Harmony 

Cannon, Cecile Loris, S. C. 

Carlton, Katherine Warsaw 

Carson, Elizabeth Statesville 



Student List 207 

SUMMER SESSION, 1939— Continued 

Carter, Catherine Asheville 

Case, Mary Evelyn Pantego 

Casey, Frances Hubbard (Mrs.) High Point 

Catlin, Ruth M Gastonia 

Causey, Delia R. 1, Liberty 

Chandler, Helen K. (Mrs.) Oak Ridge 

Changaris, Christina Durham 

Chap pell, Dorothy Elkin 

Cheek, Mary Rockwell 

Chenault, Ruthena Greensboro 

Childs, Josie L Bethesda, Ohio 

Choate, Vancine Sparta 

Clark, Francanna Shelby 

Clegg, Bobbie Lee Greensboro 

Clutts, Betty Carol Greensboro 

Cockerham, Thelma State Road 

Cole, Kathryn Durham 

Cole, Mayme High Rock 

Coleman, Mildred Norlina 

Collins, Ethel Z. (Mrs.) Gibsonville 

Coltrane, Virginia Emory, Va. 

Colvert, Margaret Briles (Mrs.) Elizabethtown 

Connelly, Loula Lawrenceville, Va. 

Coogan, Alice Louise Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Cook, Elizabeth C Raleigh 

Cope, Lillian Middlesex 

Cotten, Mabel Oswalt Fuquay Springs 

Council, Beatrice Thomasville 

Council, Mary Greensboro 

Cowan, Ida Durham 

Cox, R. Evelyn Staley 

Cox, Helen Belmont 

Crabtree, Gertrude Bahama 

Craven, Dorothy Mocksville 

Credle, Sophia Washington 

Cress, Francys Mount Ulla 

Crissman, Ruth Macon 

Critcher, Alta Williamston 

Crowell, Mattie Rebecca Richfield 

Crumpler, Ethel Roseboro 

Crutchfield, Christine R. 1, Graham 

Cullens, Jimmie Rocky Mount 

Cummings, Dorothy High Point 

Cunningham, Helen Monroe 

Currie, Elgie Lee Hemp 

Cutchin, Annie Lee Whitakers 

Davis, Bettie Cooper Areola 

Davis, Frances Elizabeth Pikeville 

Davis, Rebecca Dunn 

Davis, Valda Oxford 

Davison, Betsy Leaksville 

Dawson, Katherine R. 2, New Bern 

Day, Mary Wilmington 

Deaton, Ruth C. (Mrs.) R. 2, Greensboro 

DeBoe, Mary Greensboro 

Dees, Eula Mae Bayboro 

Dewey, Jean Goldsboro 

Dillingham, Frances Barnardsville 

Dobbins, Anne Mildred Yadkinville 

Dockery, Virginia Wadesboro 

Donavant, Helen Elizabeth R. 2, Greensboro 

Donnell, Mina Climax 

Dosier, Mary B Greensboro 

Douglas, Margaret Greensboro 

Dowd, Carolyn Carthage 

Dunn, Selma Winston-Salem 

Easter, Winnie H Walnut Cove 

Edgerton, Nympie R. l, Kenly 

Edwards, Allie George Peachland 

Edwards, Estelle Highlands 

Edwards, Lilly Riddle (Mrs.) Roxboro 



208 Woman's College — University op North Carolina 

SUMMER SESSION, 1939— Continued 

Edwards, Marjorie Peachland 

Edwards, Mary Louise R. 1, Kinston 

Eller, Ileene C. (Mrs.) Pisgah Forest 

Elliott, Martha Greensboro 

Evans, Elva Murfreesboro 

Evans, Kathryn Murfreesboro 

Everett, Mary Edwards Fayetteville 

Everhardt, Louise Cooleemee 

Ewing, Mrs. J. R Leaksville 

Fagan, Constance Hillsboro 

Farlow, Catherine Elizabeth Sophia 

Farlow, Bevan Guilford College 

Farmer, Hazel Norwood 

Faulconer, Jean Greensboro 

Ferguson, Nina Pittsboro 

Fisher, Marion Elizabeth Northampton, Mass. 

Fitzgerald, Bea Richmond, Va. 

Fleet, Sarah Greensboro 

Fleetwood, Mrs. Tilson Mars Hill 

Floyd, Pauline Fairmont 

Floyd, Vista R. 1, Fairmont 

Folger, Lula Betsy Dobson 

Fordham, Margaret Greensboro 

Foster, Mary R. 1, Mocksville 

Foushee, Mrs. E. D ,. Greensboro 

Foy, Grace Mount Airy 

Francis, Virginia King 

Freeland, Estelle Efland 

Freeman, Lucile Dobson 

Frye, Aureade Hemp 

Fuller, Kathryn Spruce Pine 

Furr, Lila V Midland 

Gaither, Nenita Reidsville 

Gandy, Thomas Ena R. 1, Wadesboro 

Gardner, Elizabeth Hendersonville 

Gardner, Laura E Macon 

Gardner, Virginia Murfreesboro 

Garrett, Robert Pope Greensboro 

Garrette, Nancy Mae Ahoskie 

Garrison, Margaret Easley, S. C. 

Geddie, Virginia Lumberton 

Gentry, Lucy Perry (Mrs.) Mountain Park 

George, Marguirette R. 3, Shelby 

Gibson, F. Edna Laurinburg 

Gilbert, Lulu Greensboro 

Gillon, Anne C. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Godbey, Louise Winston-Salem 

Godfrey, Cora Page Raleigh 

Goforth, Mary Elizabeth Charlotte 

Goldman, Beatrice New Bern 

Goss, Rebecca Greensboro 

Gravely, Nellie Woodsdale 

Gray, Mary Jasper, Ala. 

Greene, Ruth Monroe 

Greene, Vivian Union Mills 

Greer, Annie Ruth German (Mrs.) Boone 

Griffin, Dorothy M Charlotte 

Griffin, Glennie Wingate 

Griffin, Lucile Sanford 

Grimsley, Evelyn L Snow Hill 

Groves, Edna Greensboro 

Guthrie, Ruth Walnut 

Hackney, Evelyn Wilson 

Haigler, Catherine R. 2, Moncure 

Haines, Alice Mt. Pleasant 

Hale, Edna Ellis (Mrs.) Mt. Airy 

Hall. Evelyn C Durham 

Hall, Mary Anne Milton 

Hall, Violet L Bahama 

Hamilton, Martha Monroe 

Hamlett, Lettie Thomasville 



Student List 209 

SUMMER SESSION, 1939— Continued 

Hampton, Ruth Britt (Mrs.) Skyland 

Hamrick, Edith R. 3, Shelby 

Hamrick, Katherine Boiling Springs 

Hargett, Mary Elizabeth Matthews 

Harmon, Clay Mooresville 

Harrell, Edna Earle Rich Square 

Harrill, Thelma H. (Mrs.) Fayetteville 

Harry, Jeanette Grover 

Harvey, Mrs. E. T Greensboro 

Harvey, Nettie Moncks Corner, S. C. 

Hassell, Ruth Greensboro 

Hatcher, Rachel Kinston 

Hathaway, Elizabeth Elizabeth City 

Hayes, Margaret R. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Heatherley, Helen Raleigh 

Heatherley, Rose Raleigh 

Hefner, Margaret Hamlet 

Hegner, Mrs. K. P Morrisville 

Herbert, Dorothy Greensboro 

Herndon, Cora Kings Mountain 

Herring, Dorothy Greensboro 

Hewitt, Isabella Greensboro 

Heyward, Betsy Goldsboro 

Hicks, Sarah Virginia Pfafftown 

Hill, Edith Cooke (Mrs.) Pilot Mountain 

Hill, Flayree Union Mills 

Hine, Eva Louise Winston-Salem 

Hinkle, Frances Thomasville 

Hodgin, Anne Greensboro 

Hodgin. Clara H. (Mrs.) Ramseur 

Hogshead, Ethel K. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Hollingsworth, Annie F. (Mrs.) Mount Airy 

Hollowell, Edith Guilford College 

Hollowell, John Greensboro 

Holomon, Judith Rich Square 

Holt, Daisy H. (Mrs.) McLeansville 

Holt, Pauline Greensboro 

Hoppers, Imajean Whitehead 

Horn, Lucile Mocksville 

Hornaday, Wayne A Greensboro 

Howard, Betsy C Greensboro 

Howard, Dorothy W. Wilson 

Howell, Evelyn L Oxford 

Howell, Mary E. Newell (Mrs.) Mars Hill 

Howerton, Helen Asheville 

Howerton, Marjorie R. 5, Greensboro 

Hudgins, Mary Louise Beaufort 

Hudson, Clara R. 5, Reidsville 

Hudspeth, Luna Cycle 

Hudspeth, Pauline Yadkinville 

Hunnicutt, Elizabeth Asheville 

Hunt, Mary Lee Walnut Cove 

Huntington, Ann Elmira, N. Y. 

Hurwitz, Evelyn D Clinton 

Huss, Charlie (Miss) Raleigh 

Hutchison, Mai C. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Hutchinson, Mary Bee Knox (Mrs.) Star Route, Rockingham 

Hyman, Claire Greensboro 

Ingram, Rosa Mae R. 4, High Point 

Jackson, Elizabeth A Columbia, S. C. 

Jackson, Mary W. (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Jamieson, Eleanor (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Jenkins, Sara Burton Shelby 

Johns, Eugenia Ruth Greensboro 

Johnson, Emma Bain Thomasville 

Johnson, Lillian , Holly Springs 

Johnson, Mae Dobbins Thomasville 

Johnson, Martha N. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Johnston, Beatrice R. 2, Concord 

Joines, Faye Sparta 

Jones, Harriet Eleanor Raleigh 

Jones, Mary Jane Yancey ville 

Joyner, Sara Scott , R. 2, Wilson 



210 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

SUMMER SESSION, 1939— Continued 

Kauffman, Isabel (Mrs.) Williamsport, Pa. 

Kearns, Eugenia Pleasant Garden 

Kearns, Mary W Pleasant Garden 

Keck, Alberta R. 2, Snow Camp 

Keith, Mildred Memphis, Tenn. 

Keller, Sara Gastonia 

Kelly, Elizabeth Raleigh 

Kent, Oma Greensboro 

Kerns, Virginia Ether 

Kinlaw, Dora R. 5, Lumberton 

Kinlaw, Hazel Lumberton 

Kirk, Helen Ida Mocksville 

Knott, Mabel Jones Oxford 

Knott, Pearl Oxford 

Knott, Rosa Jane Burlington 

Knotts, Mildred Lilesville 

Knouse, Sarah McKellar (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Kornegay, Delia Faye Dover 

Lane, Margaret Aulander 

Lanning, Vera Mae Wallburg 

LaRoe, Alma May Greensboro 

Lassiter, Ethel Rich Square 

Lawrence, Mrs. C. G Charlotte 

Layne, Lilian Cullen, Va. 

Lazenby, Georgia , Thomson, Ga. 

Leary, Elizabeth W Washington 

LeGrand, Merrimon Greensboro 

Leonard, Marie R. 3, Lexington 

Lindley, Jennie Cannon Guilford College 

Lindsay, Mary Greensboro 

Linville, Pearl Helm (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Little, Frances Greensboro 

Lloyd, Mildred Spencer 

Ludwig, Vivian B. (Mrs.) R. 4, Concord 

Lunsford, Myrtle Ruth Asheville 

Lyerly, Virginia Woodleaf 

McBride, Bebekah Marshville 

McBryde, Margaret W. (Mrs.) Milton 

McBryde, Mary E Raeford 

McCauley, Becky R. 2, Burlington 

McCracken, Ada Lee Guilford 

McCraw, Ethel W. (Mrs.) Troy 

MacDonald, Viola Parkton 

McDuffie, Lena K. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

McGeachy, Elizabeth St. Pauls 

McGehee, Eloise R. 3, Greensboro 

MacGoog^n, Frances St. Pauls 

Mcintosh, Mary Elizabeth Raleigh 

McKenzie, Jeanne Rockingham 

McKinnon, Emily (Mrs.) Wadesboro 

McKnight, Alice M R. 2, Greensboro 

McLean, Martha Rockingham 

McLeod, Vera A R. 1, Broadway 

McNairy, Carolyn R. 2, Greensboro 

McNairy, Dorothy R. 3, Greensboro 

McNairy, Julia R. 2, Greensboro 

McNeely, Patty Mooresville 

McNeely, Virginia Shelby 

McNeill, Elizabeth Fairmont 

McPherson, Kathleen Shiloh 

McSwain, Hazel Marshville 

Mabe, Joy Belew Creek 

Madry, Alice Miller Rich Square 

Mallard, Mary J Greensboro 

Maness, Madith Hemp 

Maness, Sadie Hemp 

Mann, Doris Charlotte 

Marks, Jennie Sewell Tillery 

Marsh, Lois Marshville 

Martin, Edna Mount Olive 

Mason, Beulah Bath 



Student List 211 



SUMMER SESSION, 1939— Continued 



Mason, Ruth Greensboro 

Matlock, Cornelia Greensboro 

Matlock, Nellie (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Matlock, Ola F. Greensboro 

Matthews, Louise Rocky Mount 

May, Jack Greensboro 

Mellon, Harriett Stony Point 

Mercer, Louise Bladenboro 

Merony, Louise R. 1, Greensboro 

Mewborn, Doris Snow Hill 

Miller, Elinor Stoneville 

Millsaps, Mildred Asheboro 

Mitchell, Mollie Norlina 

Moore, Virginia Elise Greensboro 

Morgan, Elizabeth Greensboro 

Morris, Editha Tarboro 

Morrison, Janie Statesville 

Morrow, Jean Albemarle 

Moseley, Emma Kelley Warrenton 

Moseley, Leah R. 2, Kinston 

Moser, Margaret R. 4, Greensboro 

Moss, Mary Frances Grover 

Motsinger, Lula Mae R. 5, Winston-Salem 

Murphy, Marie Southern Pines 

Murray, Elberta Greensboro 

Murray, Roberta Greensboro 

Muse, Laura R. 2, Laurinburg 

Myers, Marie R. 3, Liberty 

Nafe, Bill Greensboro 

Naylor, Elizabeth Mocksville 

Neal, Hazel Greensboro 

Neece, Estelle R. 1, Pleasant Garden 

Neece, Vanner Pleasant Garden 

Neel, Elizabeth Brown Wilkesboro 

Nesbitt, Pauline Skyland 

Newman, Julia Roxboro 

Newsome, Nannie Union Mills 

Niblock, Margaret Concord 

Nicholson, Thelma B. (Mrs.) Ellerbe 

Norman, Oleen Elkin 

North, Sister Maud Emmetsburg, Md. 

Norwood, Betty Mount Airy 

Nye, Lucille R. 2, Fairmont 

O'Bryan, Helen Beaufort 

O'Connell, Sister Mary Frances Emmetsburg, Md. 

Okell, Marion Plainfield, N. J. 

Oliver, Dora Greensboro 

Oliver, Mrs. George M Yanceyville 

Oliver, Mattie Snow Hill 

Oncley, Ruth Greensboro 

O'Neil, Katherine (Mrs.) Franklin 

Ormond, Beulah D Dover 

Overman, Mary Greensboro 

Owen, Mrs. John A High Point 

Page, Helen R. 2, Cleveland 

Painter, Charlotte Maxton 

Palmer, Isabel Bayside, L. I., N. Y. 

Palmer, Mary Lacy Gulf 

Pardo, Sara Havana, Cuba 

Park, Betty Jean R. 3, Greensboro 

Parker, Annie Ruth Raleigh 

Parker, Mamie Gladis R. 2, Yanceyville 

Parker, Lucille Marion 

Paschall, Julia Wilson 

Patterson, Nell H. (Mrs.) Mount Airy 

Pearson, Paul Greensboro 

Perry, Annie Jones Raleigh 

Perry, L. H Raleigh 

Peterson, Jeanette Smithfield 

Pipkin, Jean W. (Mrs.) Broadway 

Pippin, Marianna Greensboro 

Pippin, Muriel E Fremont 

Pitts, Mary E Greensboro 



212 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

SUMMER SESSION, 1939— Continued 

Pleasant, Almeta Roanoke Rapids 

Poston, Lyda E R. 5, Shelby 

Powers, Marie St. Pauls 

Prebble, Ruth Hope Lynchburg, Va. 

Pritchard, Bessie Aulander 

Pruitt, Gertrude (Mrs.) Rockingham 

Puett, Artelee Dallas 

Purvis, Lalah Hassell Archdale 

Quinn, Elizabeth Durham 

Quisenberry, Regina (Mrs.) Mount Airy 

Rackley, Vera Smithfield 

Railey, Anna Stone Como 

Ramsey, Alta L Asheville 

Randle, Elizabeth R. 2, Kings Mountain 

Ransom, Daphne Menlo, Ga. 

Rawlings, Martha Winston-Salem 

Reece, Mary Elizabeth Winston-Salem 

Rees, Daphne McLeansville 

Reid, Edith Harmony 

Rephan, Fay Charleston, S. C. 

Rice, Dorothy L. (Mrs.) Maxton 

Richardson, Sarah R. Mineral Springs 

Riddick, Nell W Gatesville 

Robertson, Clara Pine Hall 

Robinson, Carolyn North, S. C. 

Roderick, Helen B. (Mrs.) Spencer 

Roesch, Clara Suffern, N. Y. 

Rogers, Betty Louise Franklin 

Rogers, Julia Harrington Blanheim, S. C. 

Rosa, Anna Greensboro 

Rosa, Elizabeth Greensboro 

Roseman, Margaret R. 1, Salisbury 

Royster, Lillie Spray 

Rudisill, Helen Marshall 

Ruff in, Helen Raleigh 

Rufty, Annie Dougherty (Mrs.) Scotts 

Rumley, Susan Beaufort 

Russell, Betsy R. 1, Oxford 

Russell, Ruth Bryson City 

Sadler, Mary A R. 6, Charlotte 

Sandel, Betty Jean R. 3, Raleigh 

Sawyer, Marian Frances Franklinton 

Schauer, Erma E Bayonne, N. J. 

Schmidt, Eleanor Randallstown, Md. 

Schuster, Helene Greensboro 

Scott, Mary Kerr Haw River 

Scott, Pauline H Orange, Va. 

Severson, Ruth Buffalo, N. Y. 

Sharpe, Evelyn High Point 

Sharpe, Evelyn Terry Greensboro 

Shefler, Sarah Reidsville 

Shelton, E. Louise Cartersville, Ga. 

Sherwin, Helen S Greensboro 

Shirley, Mae Townsville, S. C. 

Sikes, Alma R. 3, Greensboro 

Simmons, Jessie H Greensboro 

Simmons, Mary B R. 2, Yadkinville 

Sircom, Elizabeth Tuckahoe, N. Y. 

Sloan, Frances Greensboro 

Sloan, Louise H Mount Ulla 

Smith, Annie Blanche Francisco 

Smith, Dorothy Walstonburg 

Smith, Eleanor H. (Mrs.) Mount Airy 

Smith, Eloise D R. 5, Kernersville 

Smith, Florence F. Erwin 

Smith, Frances Evelyn R. 1, Greensboro 

Smith, Helen Kannapolis 

Smith, Mabel Lea Guilford College 

Smith, Margaret W Fayetteville 

Smith, Martha Hefner (Mrs) R. 1, Greensboro 

Smith, Mary Sue Covington, Tenn. 

Smith, Mozelle Olive (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Smith, Rachel Francisco 

Smith, M. Ruth R. 1, Shelby 



Student List 213 

SUMMER SESSION, 1939— Continued 

Smith, Violet Tuttle (Mrs.) Stoneville 

Smith, Virginia Star 

Snow, Theresa Kernersville 

Southerland, Ellen Kenansville 

Southern, Henrietta Smith R. 1, Walnut Cove 

Spencer, Mary Neal (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Spivey, Celeste Rich Square 

Spratt, Mary Louise R. 3, Charlotte 

Stafford, Beatrice Louise Summerfield 

Stallings, Margie R. 4, Durham 

Steed, Naomi Candor 

Stephenson, Helen Angier 

Sterling, Virginia Charlotte 

Stevenson, Irma Cape Charles, Va. 

Still, Lorita Woodruff (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Stockard, Jessie Montreat 

Stokes, Evelyn Kilby (Mrs.) Oak Ridge 

Strickland, Ruth Greensboro 

Stringfield, Thomasine Waynesville 

Swain, Olena B Williamston 

Sykes, Pearl Lindley Greensboro 

Taylor, Margaret Bunn R. 1, Nashville 

Teague, Annabel R. 1, Siler City 

Thayer, Mary Alice High Point 

Thompson, Mary White Wilson 

Tillett, Gladys Charlotte 

Tippett, Bess P. (Mrs.) R. 3, Greensboro 

Tolbert, A. Elizabeth Charlotte 

Tomlinson, Virginia North Wilkesboro 

Tooly, Sidney Anne Belhaven 

Towe, Sara E R. 3, Rocky Mount 

Trexler, Willie R. 3, Salisbury 

Triplett, Etta Lee Purlear 

Tripp, Florence Washington 

Trotter, Margaret Ward (Mrs.) Winston-Salem 

Trulious, Evelyn Viola Knoxville, Tenn. 

Tucker, Naomi R. 1, Guilford College 

Tucker, Nelson Danville, Va. 

Turner, Catherine Gaffney, S. C. 

Turner, Nellie Mebane 

Turner, Ruth G. (Mrs.) Summerfield 

Tuttle, Elizabeth L. (Mrs.) Walkertown 

Tuttle, Myrtle E Walnut Cove 

Tysinger, Dorothy R. 6, Lexington 

Tyson, Margaret Asheboro 

Tyson, Martha A. (Mrs.) Waxhaw 

Umstead, Sarah Chapel Hill 

Varner, Helen Rae Washington 

Vernon, Reba Blanch 

Wadsworth, Elizabeth R. 2, Carthage 

Wagoner, Lillie McC. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Waldroup, Geneva Hayesville 

Walker, Carrie S Burlington 

Walthall, Nancy Ashland, Ky. 

Warmer, Bessie Barker (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Warren, Eva Christine Collettsville 

Warren, Florence Sparta 

Warren, Mary Foster Prospect Hill 

Warren, Sara Hurdle Mills 

Watson, Elizabeth Allen Anderson, S. C. 

Way, Hulda O, Greensboro 

Webb, Neeta Mount Airy 

Webb, Stafford Greensboro 

Weisner, Foda White (Mrs.) Olin 

Welborn, Jean Greensboro 

Welborn, Ruth High Point 

Welch, Eloise Thomasville 

Wells, Lucy Kenansville 

Wells, Virginia Greensboro 

Weston, Frances Guilford College 

White, Almeta Kellogg (Mrs.) Knightdale 

White, Emily Greensboro 

White, Genevieve H Brooklyn, N. Y. 

White, Lillian B. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

White, Mrs. L. Lea Guilford College 



214 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

SUMMER SESSION, 1939— Continued 

White, Martha (Mrs.) Ramseur 

Whiteley, Frances Burton (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Whitesides, Carl ...... Rutherfordton 

Whiteside, Mary W. (Mrs.) Parmele 

Whitesides, Doris Newland 

Whitley, Ethel ZZZZZZZZ"jiawhvflle 

Whitley, Eunice R. 3> Wilson 

Whitley, Helen Gray Enfield 

Whitley, Kathryn Enfield 

Whitlock, Helen P R. 4, Albemarle 

Williams, Elizabeth B. (Mrs.) Greensboro 

Williams, Nell Lincolnton 

Williams, Sarah R. 3, Statesville 

Williams, Swanna K. (Mrs.) Hemp 

Williard, Elizabeth Graham (Mrs.) Farmington 

Wills, Anna Greensboro 

Wilson, Alice E Greensboro 

Wilson, Catherine Yanceyville 

Wilson, George P., Jr Greensboro 

Wilson, Rebecca Blanch 

Wimbish, Mary Lou Greensboro 

Woodard, Susan Steele (Mrs.) Laurel Hill 

Wrenn, Mary Louise Siler City 

Wright, Catherine R. 4, Henderson 

Wyman, Ella Sloan Walterboro 

Yale, Anita Greensboro 

Yarbrough, Rachel Yanceyville 

Yates, C. G Greensboro 

Yelverton, G. A R. 2, Greensboro 

Yow, Lottie Haigler (Mrs.) R. 3, Greensboro 

Zachary, Arka R. 1, Snow Camp 

DEGREES CONFERRED 

At the Forty-seventh Annual Commencement of the College 
June 5, 1939 

BACHELORS OF ARTS 

Doris Patterson Adams Warrenton 

Florence Gertrude Albright Roselle, N. J. 

Ethel Altshuler Paterson, N. J. 

Imo Jean Anthony Yadkinville 

Margarette Austin High Point 

Edith Jean Baillie McDonald, Pa. 

Corinna Anne Bain Fayetteville, R. 3 

Susan Elizabeth Barksdale Greensboro 

Katherine Davis Bernhardt Salisbury 

Lucile Bethea Dillon, S. C. 

Alice Duffy Blades New Bern 

Catherine May Blanchard Hobbsville 

Doris Mae Bland Vanceboro 

Frances Bynum Bland* J Pittsboro 

Elizabeth Bonham Bergenfield, N. J. 

Helen Parker Book Albemarle 

Doris Hope Bowman Brown Summit 

Catherine Brabble Oriental 

Mary Katherine Bradley Greensboro 

Beulah Josephine Brick Dillon, S. C. 

Frances Eugenia Brinkley Glen Alpine 

Elizabeth Marie Brookshire Asheville 

Emelie Rose Brown Tarboro 

Mary Elizabeth Brown Erwin 

Pauline Hervey Brownlee Spartanburg, S. C. 

Eleanor Emily Jane Bundy Decatur, Ga. 

Jean Kittrell Cannon Ayden 

Jeanne Elizabeth Carey Elmira, N. Y. 

* Dated July 16, 1938. 
t Absent by permission. 



Student List 215 

BACHELORS OF ARTS— Continued 

Catherine Carpenter Cherryville, R. 1 

Hazel Vivien Carson Taylorsville 

Edna Hammond Cartwright Baltimore, Md. 

Ada Pearle Chamness Blenheim, S. C. 

Dorothy Lucille Chandler*$ Broadway 

Norma Juerelle Cheatham Lenoir 

Jane Marshall Clegg Greensboro 

Mary Elizabeth Cochrane Newton 

Ruth Elizabeth Coe High Rock 

Elizabeth Bouldin Cowherd Greensboro 

Geraldine Hollon Cox Washington 

Eltha Muriel Coykendall Greensboro 

Julia Belle Cozzens Edenton 

Sara McCarten Craig Monroe 

Xyldia Blois Crawford Bellarthur 

Mary Jane Crenshaw Asheville 

Elizabeth Adams Crosby Raleigh 

Diana Sharretts Curley Monkton, Md. 

Margaret Peterson Darden§$ Windsor 

Rubyleigh Davis Fremont 

Mary Grace Davis§t Tobaccoville 

Virginia Myers Dearman Harmony 

Ann Wheatley Dees Goldsboro 

Margaret Lee Deibridge Littleton 

Rachael Patterson Draughon Dunn 

Selma James Dunn Winston-Salem 

Jane Dupuy Greensboro 

Virginia Margaret Eggleston Morristown, N. J. 

Dorothy Van Elkins Greensboro 

Marion Endfield Scranton, Pa. 

Janie Yates Everett Robersonville 

Frances Ogburn Fentress Greensboro 

Dorothy Dodge Ficker Greenwich, Conn. 

Ruby Pauline Fields Carthage 

Marion White Fisher Wilmington 

Martha Eleanor Floyd Fairmont 

Alice Elisabeth Galbreath Bloomsburg, Pa. 

Emma Lou Garner Creedmoor 

Mildred Maxine Garner Liberty 

Sara Elizabeth Gray Guilford College 

Jane Frances Griffith Greensboro 

Mary Francis Gyles Raleigh 

Margaret Alice Haines Mount Pleasant 

Evelyn Christabelle Hall Durham 

Mabel Hoover Hargett High Point 

Sally Gray Hargrove Tarboro 

Margaret Elizabeth Harkrader§J Dobson 

Emily Irving Harris Greensboro 

Bettie Stewart Harward Sanford 

Wilma Leona Helsabeck Ether 

Mary Wilson Henderson Jacksonville 

Jane Williams Highsmith Atkinson 

Grace Muriel Hilford Maples 

Emily Elizabeth Hinshaw* Whitsett 

Ella Thomas Hobbs Sunbury 

Kathryn Hurdle Elizabeth City 

Hannah Oliver Huske Fayetteville 

Mildred Covington James Laurinburg 

Phyllis Evelyn Keister Greensboro 

Marion Eleanor Kerchner Greensboro 

Dorothy Mildred Kolman Pittsfield, Mass. 

Leanna Elizabeth Koonce Wilmington 

Jenny Prudence LaSpina Newark, N. J. 

Edna Effie Laws Rougemont 

Doris Elizabeth Leach LaGrange 

Lillian Electa Leef Clayton 

Ruth Albertine Lee High Point 

Vera Lenore Leeger Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Wilma Phyllis Levine Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Frances Lillian Levy Brookline, Mass. 



* Dated July 16, 1938. 
t Absent by permission. 
§ Dated August 26, 1938. 



216 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

BACHELORS OF ARTS— Continued 

Caroline Marie Lewis Southern Pines 

Claudeline Lewis Enfield 

Attie Belle Liles Gastonia 

Arlene Evelyn Littlefield Boothbay Harbor, Me. 

Virginia Peele Livingston Laurel Hill 

Frances Adelaide Love Greensboro 

Bobbie Jean Love Asheville 

Christine Beatrice McAdams Rougemont 

Anne Watson McCabe Oriental 

Dorothy McKenzie§$ Pinehurst 

Julia Skinner McLean§$ Winston-Salem 

Frances Alexander McLeod§$ Brevard 

Nancy Rose McManaway Hendersonville 

Doris Penelope McMillan Lumberton 

Evelyn Ayers McNairyJ Greensboro, R. 2 

Mary King Mallonee Murphy 

Mildred Christine Marshburn Richlands 

Elsie Fogleman Marston Reidsville 

June Josephine Maupin Holcomb Rock, Va. 

Myrtle Howard Merritt Magnolia 

Charlotte Elizabeth Michlin Greenwich, Conn. 

Julia Virginia Miles Raleigh 

Louisa Morton Millard Greensboro, R. 4 

Rosalie Mitchell Vineland, N. J. 

Barbara Marion Moon Asbury Park, N. J. 

Barbara Hall Moore Old Greenwich, Conn. 

Dorothy Morell§$ Hickory 

Marjorie Moseley LaCrosse, Va. 

Alice Barlow Murdoch Salisbury 

Evelyn Mae Newman , Roxboro 

Forrest Hale Nimocks Fayetteville 

Frankie Louise Northcott Raleigh 

Louise Bennett Northcott Asheville 

Helen J. 01iver§t Marietta 

Alma O'Neal Ormond Dover 

Anna Catharine Owen Sharon, Conn. 

Dolores Virginia Palmer Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Minnie Louise Parker Ahoskie 

Alberta Parrott§$ Kinston 

Mamie Evelyn Patrick Durham 

Bertie Snuggs Patterson Albemarle 

Marion Isabel Pelton Southern Pines 

Mary Alice Perkins*$ Greensboro 

Caroline Elizabeth Phillips Spruce Pine 

Ellen Jeannette Piatt Winston-Salem 

Alice Powell Berwyn, Md. 

Willie Stephenson Pritchard Seaboard 

Mary Elizabeth Purvis Salisbury 

Marjorie Ellis Pye Greensboro 

Esther Anne Quinn Shelby 

Gertrude Annette Rainey Martinsville, N. J. 

Ethel Raymer Statesville 

Gloria Reagan Weaverville 

Ethel Louise Reavis Winston-Salem 

Caroline Jane Rigg Greensboro 

Julia English Roberts Marshall 

Virginia Sevier Rogers Berkeley, Cal. 

Dorothy Rosseland Short Hills, N. J. 

Margaret Nancy Ryan Asheville 

Elsie Ruth Sanford Greensboro 

Louise Wortham Sharp Reidsville 

Hassie Mae Sherrill Statesville 

Evelyn Lourena Sloan Lykesland, S. C. 

Adele Esther Smirnow New Haven, Conn. 

Leah Constance Smirnow New Haven, Conn. 

Catherine Colby Smith Atlanta, Ga. 

Elizabeth Wright Smith New Bern 

Virginia Pauline Smith Rocky Mount 

Doris Anita Spainhcur Tobaccoville 

Mary Emily Stanton Wilmington 

* Dated July 16, 1938. 
t Absent by permission. 
S Dated August 26, 1938. 



Student List 217 

BACHELORS OF ARTS— Continued 

Flora Elizabeth Steele Wagram 

Marie Stephens Lumberton, R. 2 

Marion Carroll Stoker Greensboro 

Mary Elizabeth Suitt Hillsboro, R. 3 

Olena B. Swain Williamston 

Evelyn Elizabeth Swaringen Concord 

Rachel Tabor Arlington, Va. 

Sophia Ellen Taplin High Point 

Susannah Hawkins Thomas Wadesboro 

Katherine Elizabeth Thomason Roanoke Rapids 

Mildred Stallings Thomason Whiteville 

Sarah Elizabeth Trimble Greensboro 

Dorothy Truitt Greensboro 

Annie Laurie Turberville Milton 

Mable Irene Upchurch Angier 

Hazel Hyatt Walker Cincinnati, O. 

Agnes Mae Warren Newton Grove 

Josephine Watson Kenly 

Mayce Eleanor Weeks MaysviJle 

Rachel Susan Weyher Kinston 

Elizabeth Ann Wharton Greensboro 

Mary Carter Whitehurst New Bern 

Kathleen Whitley Wingate 

Sarah Parker Whitney Greensboro 

Dorothy Merrill Wilkinson Marion 

Nellie Walker Willetts*$ Winnabow 

Ellen Meade Wilson Wilmington 

Rubye Aylene Womble New Hill 

Virginia Millie Wood Long Island, N. Y. 

Margaret Douglas Woodson Salisbury 

Jean Rachael Ziel Mt. Clemens, Mich. 

Mary Valeria Zimmerman Reading, Pa. 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Mary Gretchen Aycock Fremont 

Julia Edith Barrier Mount Pleasant, R. 1 

Annie Louise Beck Fuquay Springs 

Mary Jane Beckerdite Winston-Salem, R. 5 

Avis Bolderson Charlotte 

Mary Edith Boliek Hickory, R. 1 

Mary Anne Burdge Red Bank, N. J. 

Nancy Yancey Click Elkin 

Elisabeth Harrelson Craft Cherryville, R. 1 

Pauline Elizabeth Craft Pittsboro, R. 2 

Henrietta Hobgood Currin Oxford, R. 3 

Julia Lee Dameron Star 

Elna Elizabeth Daniels Charlotte 

Helen Aileen Dennis Marshall 

Carolyn Elizabeth Dukes Lumberton 

Mattie Lou Edwards Whitehead 

Virginia Liles Edwards Marshville 

Jeanette Flowe Selma 

Mabel Virginia Foy Mount Airy 

Maude Elizabeth Freeland Greensboro 

Katherine Jane Grier Statesville 

Reva May Heidinger Cranbury, N. J. 

Elinor Sinclair Henderson Hickory 

Margaret Elizabeth Jones Johns 

Merrill Rachel Kelly Apex, R. 3 

Ethel York Kiker Wadesboro 

Margaret Wilson McAllister Mount Pleasant 

Mary Elizabeth Michael Pleasant Garden 

Amelia Nott Moore Weldon 

Kate Knox Niblock Concord 

Eleanor Marie Ortleb Westfield, N. J. 

Margaret Louise Phillips Dalton 

Mildred Carolyn Pigg Charlotte, R. 1 

Helen Alexander Player Morganton 

* Dated July 16, 1938. 
% Absent by permission. 



218 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS— Continued 

Virginia Mae Powell Brevard 

Eudora Louise Robinson 13^3.".............. Maiden 

Grace Valesta Rosser Jonesboro 

Maude Elizabeth Scott Mebane 

Margaret Evelyn Shepherd "/....Greensboro 

Laura Harriet Silbiger Greensboro 

Myrtle Simpson Monroe, R. 3 

Juanita Elkins Smith*! Whiteville, R. 2 

Gladys Ellen Strawn Marshville 

Bertie Elizabeth Taylor Greensboro 

Anna Hughes Turner Raleigh, R. 2 

Dorothy Phillips Turner Forest City 

Pearl Elizabeth Turner Guilford College 

Blanche Shaw Tuten Edward 

Jane Tilley Umstead South Boston, Va. 

Mary Elizabeth Whitehead Greensboro 

Annie Ruth Wilson Guilford College 

Sarah Elizabeth Winslow Scotland Neck 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN SECRETARIAL ADMINISTRATION 

Fannie Lynn Adams§J Angier 

Frances Parker Appel Indianapolis, Ind. 

Geneva Frances Austin* J Marshville 

Mary Rachael Barnes Wilson, R. 2 

Justina Bernard Lenoir 

Margaret Martin Best Fremont 

Willie Ruby Blackburn§t Ingold 

Frances Louise Boland Burlington 

Margaret Louise Bolus Wake Forest 

Edna Earle Bostick Charlotte 

Ethel Braxton Kinston 

Mary Ruth Brewer Hemp 

Jamie Virginia Brown Spencer 

Edna Spencer Buchanan Chapel Hill 

Helen Louise Bumgarner Wilkesboro 

Helen Callaham Charlotte 

Ruth Rebecca Cash Gastonia 

Christine Ruff Cauthen Rock Hill, S. C. 

Mary Kathryn Coble Monroe 

Helen Althea Cook ." Plainfield, N. J. 

Margaret Minerva Coppage Vanceboro 

Mary Frances Crockett Montclair, N. J. 

Mary Jo Curry Lexington 

Esther Louise Darden Wilson 

Eleanor Dibble Springfield, Mass. 

Doris Lee Dozier South Mills 

Sarah Virginia Dunlap Wadesboro 

Betty Mayo Everett Palmyra 

Frances Gertrude Furr Salisbury 

Margaret Haviland Galloway Greensboro 

Sarah Anne Garrison Asheville, R. 1 

Virginia Rose Geddie Lumberton 

Julia Bright Godwin Dunn 

Ruth Greenburg Louisburg 

Ruth Hamilton Lumberton 

Helen Henderson Monroe 

Jeannette Carolyn Hickman Hudson 

Margaret Hanes Hill Greensboro 

Paula Maxine Hobgood Greensboro 

Margaret John Holland Clayton 

Marjorie Irene Horn Mocksville 

Eulalia Frances Horner Burlington 

Grace Mildred Howell Asheville 

Julia Brown Hudgins Hobbsville 

Virginia Ranson Hunter Greensboro 

Margaret Idol Pleasant Garden 

Sarah Wilson Jones High Point 



* Dated July 16, 1938. 
X Absent by permission. 
§ Dated August 26, 1938. 



Student List 219 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN SECRETARIAL ADMINISTRATION— 
Continued 

Irma Gray Jordan Timberland 

Frances Barrett Joyner Farmville 

Martha Dinwiddie Kellar Flint, Mich. 

Ruth Vanstory King Greensboro 

Edna Levine Greensboro 

Christine Rebecca McBrayer Forest City 

Mary Katherine McLauglin Cleveland 

Dorothy McLawhorn Vanceboro 

Jessie Margaret McLean Cameron 

Lillian Florence Mann Flushing, N. Y. 

Grace Winifred Mewborn Snow Hill 

Janet Bruce Miller Annapolis, Md. 

Mary Jane Mims Greensboro 

Inez Rebecca Moore Lenoir, R. 4 

Claudia Winifred Moseley Kinston 

Elizabeth Moore Myers Wilmington 

Doris Lee Nowell Greensboro 

Virginia Gray Nowell Greensboro 

Lillian Juanita Osborne Asheville 

Beverly Lorraine Phillips West Englewood, N. J. 

Evelyn Poliakoff§J Kinston 

Antoinette Irene Pospisil New York City 

Margaret Raper Lexington, R. 1 

Edna Kathryn Rettew , Mooresville 

Elizabeth Lavinia Roberts Concord 

Jo Elaine Robertson Wendell 

Virginia Elizabeth Rose Wilson 

Mary Helen Ross Hiddenite 

Mary Willie Rotha Waynesville 

Anne Sage Short Hills, N. J. 

Beverly Ann Sharpe Greensboro 

Grace Elizabeth Sharpe Greensboro, R. 4 

Julia Bishop Smallwood New Bern 

Myra Suggs Smith Wilmington 

Sarah Elizabeth Smith Asheville 

Virginia Elliott Smithit Greensboro 

Hilda Rose Snyder Winston-Salem, R. 4 

Mildred Lea Spoon Burlington 

Ethel Mae Stanley Four Oaks, R. 2 

Hester Hicks Tolar Fayetteville 

Jane Carroll Truesdell High Point 

Rachael Floreine Tyndall Kinston 

Nell Elizabeth Tyson Georgetown, S. C. 

Edith Helen Veasey Fuquay Springs 

Hilda Edna Walker Greensboro 

Thelma Elizabeth Whitley Marshville 

Elliotte Elizabeth Whitson Asheville 

Harriet Joyner Wiggins Tarboro 

Elizabeth Evelyn Wilkinson Charlotte 

Elizabeth Pearl Wilkinson Burnside, Ky. 

Ballard Ramsey Wilson Rocky Mount 

Edith Winifred Winborne Aulander 

Alice Goodson Wright Wake Forest 

Martha A. Wright New York City 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Helen Cashwell Boiling High Point 

Mary Louise Crowell Charlotte 

Rachel Louise Emmett New York City 

Miriam Ashe Gault Lake Waccamaw 

Viola R. Gradeck New Britain, Conn. 

Doris Esther Hutchinson Charlotte 

Mary Margaret Johnson Charlotte 

Marjory Anne Kinney $ Charlotte 

Marjorie Louise Leonard Cumberland, Md. 

Lena Eloise McLean Greensboro 

Margaret Britton Poynor Florence, S. C. 

Ruth Mae Rogers Clyde, R. 1 

Kathryn Ruth Schneck Allentown, Pa. 

t Absent by permission. 
§ Dated August 26, 1938. 



220 Woman's College — University of North Carolina 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION— Continued 

Mary Elizabeth Seibert Derby, N. Y. 

Leah Elizabeth Skelton Montclair, N. J. 

Nelle Letitia Sturkey ..' Albemarle 

Dorothy Louise Tyson Mebane 

Helen Huber Weitzel Manheim, Pa. 

Elizabeth Scott Wescott Chestertown, Md. 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC 

Katherine S. Cooper Raleigh 

Mary Rebecca Epps Asheville 

Muriel Lorraine Fairbanks Freehold, N. J. 

Florence Campbell Hunt Greensboro 

Martha Josephine Lowrance Salisbury 

Eleanor McClung Lexington, Va. 

Kathryn Hardy Mewborn Tarboro 

Anna Miller Helen, Ga. 

Marie Victoria Perez Ciudad Trujillo, Santa Domingo 

Ylia Puig*$ Greensboro 

Ethel Elaine Reagan Weaverville 

Evelyn Sharp High Point 

Inez Elizabeth Shuford Hickory, R. 3 

Mary Elizabeth Taylor New Bern 

Geraline Fuquay Young Angier 

* Dated July 16, 1938. 
J Absent by permission. 

PHI BETA KAPPA 

Elections from Class of 1939 — 

Florence Gertrude Albright Caroline Marie Lewis 

Edna Hammond Cartwright Claudeline Lewis 

Selma James Dunn Frances Adelaide Love 

Jane Dupuy Mamie Evelyn Patrick 

Martha Eleanor Floyd Esther Anne Quinn 

Mildred Maxine Garner Gertrude Annette Rainey 

Phyllis Evelyn Keister Sophia Ellen Taplin 

Dorothy Mildred Kolman Dorothy Truitt 

Wilma Phyllis Levine Elizabeth Ann Wharton 
Margaret Douglas Woodson 

Elections from Class of 1940 — 

Margaret Abernethy Kathryn Britten 

Dorothy Brock Betty Clutts 

Marie Dimmette Celia Durham 

Janet Groner Lettie Hamlett 

Roberta Hardee Mary Ellen Hege 

Patricia Irwin Eunice King 

Jennie Klein Mary Louise Lively 

Grace Evelyn Loving Lynette Moss 

Mary Overman Frances Louise Ramsey 

Helene Schuster Altha Stevens 

Marjorie Swanson Sue Sweeney 

Charlie Lou Washington Jane Zimmerman 



\